England v New Zealand 2nd ODI: England are humbled by Guptill’s historic hit after drop

New Zealand 359-3 England 273

The Rose Bowl

Martin Guptill’s historic century dented England’s Champions Trophy ambitions and guided New Zealand to an 86-run win here yesterday. The result means the visitors take an unassailable 2-0 lead into the final match at Trent Bridge on Wednesday.

Not since Sir Viv Richards wielded a willow on these shores has an English attack been treated with such  merciless disdain. Somehow amid the carnage James Anderson took the two wickets he needed to join Darren Gough as England’s leading one-day wicket-taker, but the day belonged to Guptill.

The New Zealand opener’s undefeated 189 matched Sir Viv’s as the highest one-day score against England but the Kiwi took 15 fewer balls to break English bowlers.

To put both men’s efforts in context, only four batsman have scored more in 3,361 internationals. The legendary West Indian’s knock came at Old Trafford in 1984 and was more remarkable in that it made up the bulk of a total of just 272 when the next highest score was 26. Under the south coast sun, Guptill’s bat-carrying knock helped his side to a dizzying total of 359, their highest against England. 

Wisden, the cricketing bible, ranks Richards’ knock as the finest one-day international innings of all time. It is unlikely Guptill’s will supplant it, not least because of the ample support he received from first Kane Williamson, then Ross Taylor and captain Brendon McCullum. All three shared in century partnerships with Guptill, McCullum helping him to add 118 runs off the last 50 balls.

Guptill’s gorging comes on the back of his 103 not out at Lord’s last Friday. With the two sides due to meet in Nottingham and again in the Champions Trophy group stages, the England captain Alastair Cook will be hoping that the 26-year-old’s purple patch turns yellow-bellied before then.

 



Cook at least got England’s reply off to a rapid start that raised hopes of a record one-day run chase, overtaking the 304 they hunted down against Pakistan in Karachi in 2000. Alongside his opening partner Ian Bell, Cook helped England race to 50 within eight overs before the strapping Kyle Mills rocked the England captain onto the back foot when he should have been forward.

With Bell at the crease, those who believe in history repeating itself still had hope. Twice before on this ground he has made international centuries. There was to be no repetition of that but there was a degree of farce to his dismissal for 25 from 32 balls. He stepped down the pitch to Doug Bracewell with menace but only succeeded in tamely looping the ball to mid-off. That brought together Joe Root and Jonathan Trott but not even Trott’s first one-day maximum outside of Wales could alter the fact that England were batting on a crease to nowhere.

The pair added 58 runs before Root went for one big shot too many and found long-on to hand Nathan McCullum a wicket. Trott clung on until the bitter end but his unbeaten 109 was a mere postscript.

It could have been so different. Just as at Lord’s, Guptill was dropped on 13; perhaps on the other side of the equator 13 is a lucky number. On that occasion the buttered fingers belonged to Tim Bresnan, yesterday it was Trott. On both occasions the bowler was Chris Woakes. There were early signs that England’s fielders had bloopers in them: two bits of sloppy fielding cost England five runs in the first three overs.

Anderson crashed through Luke Ronchi’s timber to erase the cost of those misfields and leave the visitors 12 for 1. At that point 359 seemed a long way off. But when Trott fumbled at midwicket, anything was possible. The unfortunate Woakes had been given a chance to redeem himself with the ball and with his fourth one, he thought he had the wicket that would have steeled brittle confidence but his county team-mate spilt the straightforward chance. His short ball – short on pace and bounce – may not have deserved a wicket but Woakes did not merit such an early blow.

Guptill did not look such a gift horse in the mouth. With all the talk of Twenty20-bred innovation and gym-honed levers, he and Williamson relied on a style of batting built on the classic foundations of timing and technique. For a man dressed all in black on a summer’s day, Williamson was playing one of the great unnoticed innings. He reached his half-century off 59 balls and looked like he could have quietly milked the English attack until the building site that hulks over the Northern End turns into the promised hotel. However, in an effort to get noticed he tied himself in knots against Graeme Swann and went for 55.

Taylor was his replacement at the crease and he carried on in a similar vein to Williamson bar one muscular swoop for six. He reached his half-century with a rapier cut off Bresnan that emboldened the New Zealand No 3. So much so that the next bowler in his sights was Anderson. A casual flicked six was his first salvo but Anderson struck back the next ball to go level with Gough. That only brought McCullum to the crease. And the rest, as they say, was history.

Rose bowl scoreboard

The Rose Bowl (One day): New Zealand beat England by 86 runs

New Zealand won toss

NEW ZEALAND

M J Guptill not out 189

155 balls 2 sixes 19 fours

†L Ronchi b Anderson 2

9 balls 0 sixes 0 fours

K S Williamson b Swann 55

63 balls 0 sixes 3 fours

L R P L Taylor c Woakes b Anderson 60

54 balls 2 sixes 3 fours

*B B McCullum not out 40

19 balls 2 sixes 3 fours

Extras (b4 lb4 w5) 13

Total (for 3, 50 overs) 359

Fall: 1-12, 2-132, 3-241.

Did not bat: G D Elliott, J E C Franklin, N L McCullum, D A J Bracewell, K D Mills, M J McClenaghan.

Bowling: J M Anderson 10-0-65-2, T T Bresnan 10-1-73-0, C R Woakes 7-0-49-0, J W Dernbach 10-0-87-0, J E Root 3-0-16-0, G P Swann 10-0-61-1.

ENGLAND

*A N Cook b Mills 34

31 balls 0 sixes 5 fours

I R Bell c Franklin b Bracewell 25

32 balls 0 sixes 4 fours

I J L Trott not out 109

104 balls 1 sixes 5 fours

J E Root c Bracewell b N L McCullum 28

27 balls 0 sixes 1 fours

E J G Morgan c Ronchi b Elliott 21

23 balls 0 sixes 2 fours

†J C Buttler c Guptill b McClenaghan 2

3 balls 0 sixes 0 fours

C R Woakes c Ronchi b Williamson 13

15 balls 0 sixes 0 fours

T T Bresnan run out 0

2 balls 0 sixes 0 fours

G P Swann b Williamson 1

5 balls 0 sixes 0 fours

J M Anderson b McClenaghan 28

19 balls 0 sixes 4 fours

J W Dernbach c Mills b McClenaghan 2

5 balls 0 sixes 0 fours

Extras (lb3 w6 nb1) 10

Total (44.1 overs) 273

Fall: 1-50, 2-64, 3-122, 4-166, 5-169, 6-212, 7-213, 8-218, 9-265.

Bowling: M J McClenaghan 8.1-0-35-3, K D Mills 9-0-55-1, D A J Bracewell 8-1-55-1, N L McCullum 8-0-47-1, J E C Franklin 5-0-40-0, G D Elliott 2-0-13-1, K S Williamson 4-0-25-2.

Umpires: R J Bailey and S J Davis.

Voices
Numbers of complaints about unwanted calls have trebled in just six months
voices
News
people
Arts & Entertainment
Picture of innocence: Ricky Gervais and Karl Pilkington in ‘Derek’
tvReview: The insights of Ricky Gervais's sweet and kind character call to mind Karl Pilkington's faux-naïf podcast observations
Arts & Entertainment
Tangled up in blue: Singer-songwriter Judith Owen
musicAnd how husband Harry Shearer - of Spinal Tap and The Simpsons fame - helped her music flourish
VIDEO
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition iPad app?
Arts & Entertainment
Paul Weller: 'I am a big supporter of independent record stores but the greedy touts making a fast buck off genuine fans is disgusting'
music
Arts & Entertainment
William Shakespeare's influence on English culture is still strongly felt today, from his plays on stage to words we use everyday
arts
Sport
Karim Benzema celebrates scoring the opening goal
sportReal Madrid 1 Bayern Munich 0: Germans will need their legendary self-belief to rescue Champions League tie in second leg
Life & Style
Looking familiar: The global biometrics industry is expected to grow to $20bn by 2020
tech
Sport
Manchester United manager David Moyes has claimed supporters understand the need to look at
sportScot thanks club staff and fans, but gives no specific mention of players
News
Strange 'quack' noises could be undersea chatter of Minke whales
science
News
weird news... and film it, obviously
Life & Style
Balancing act: City workers at the launch of Cityfathers
lifeThe organisation is the brainchild of Louisa Symington-Mills who set up Citymothers in 2012 - a group boasting more than 3,000 members
Arts & Entertainment
tv
News
Fresh hope: Ruth Womak and her dog Jess. A free training course in basic computing skills changed Ruth’s life
educationHow a housing association's remarkable educational initiative gave hope to tenant battling long-term illness and depression
News
Rohff is one of France’s most popular rappers
people
Caption competition
Caption competition
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition iPad app?
Daily Quiz
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

Career Services

Day In a Page

Migrants in Britain a decade on: The Poles who brought prosperity

Migrants in Britain a decade on

The Poles who brought prosperity
Philippe Legrain: 'The eurozone crisis has tipped many into disillusionment, despair and extremism - we need a European Spring'

Philippe Legrain: 'We need a European Spring'

The eurozone crisis has tipped many into disillusionment, despair and extremism - this radically altered landscape calls for a new kind of politics, argues the economist
A History of the First World War in 100 moments: A moment of glory on the Western Front for the soldiers of the Raj

A History of the First World War in 100 moments

A moment of glory on the Western Front for the soldiers of the Raj
Judith Owen reveals how husband Harry Shearer - star of This Is Spinal Tap and The Simpsons - helped her music flourish

Judith Owen: 'How my husband helped my music flourish'

Her mother's suicide and father's cancer also informed the singer-songwriter's new album, says Pierre Perrone
The online lifeline: How a housing association's remarkable educational initiative gave hope to tenant battling long-term illness and depression

Online lifeline: Housing association's educational initiative

South Yorkshire Housing Association's free training courses gave hope to tenant battling long-term illness and depression
Face-recognition software: Is this the end of anonymity for all of us?

Face-recognition software: The end of anonymity?

The software is already used for military surveillance, by police to identify suspects - and on Facebook
Train Kick Selfie Guy is set to scoop up to $250,000 thanks to his viral video - so how can you cash in on your candid moments?

Viral videos: Cashing in on candid moments

Train Kick Selfie Guy Jared Frank could receive anything between $30,000 to $250,000 for his misfortune - and that's just his cut of advertising revenue from being viewed on YouTube
The world's fastest elevators - 20 metres per second - are coming soon to China

World's fastest elevators coming soon to China

Whatever next? Simon Usborne finds out from Britain's highest authority on the subject
Cityfathers tackles long-hours culture that causes men to miss out on seeing their children

Cityfathers tackles long-hours culture

The organisation is the brainchild of Louisa Symington-Mills, a chief operating officer who set up Citymothers in 2012 - a group that now boasts more than 3,000 members
Brits who migrate to Costa del Sol more unhappy than those who stay at home

It's not always fun in the sun: Moving abroad does not guarantee happiness

Brits who migrate to Costa del Sol more unhappy than those who stay at home
Migrants in Britain a decade on: They came, they worked, they stayed in Lincolnshire

Migrants in Britain a decade on

They came, they worked, they stayed in Lincolnshire
Chris Addison on swapping politics for pillow talk

Chris Addison on swapping politics for pillow talk

The 'Thick of It' favourite thinks the romcom is an 'awful genre'. So why is he happy with a starring role in Sky Living's new Lake District-set series 'Trying Again'?
Why musicians play into their old age

Why musicians play into their old age

Nick Hasted looks at how they are driven by a burning desire to keep on entertaining fans despite risking ridicule
How can you tell a gentleman?

How can you tell a gentleman?

A list of public figures with gallant attributes by Country Life magazine throws a fascinating light on what it means to be a gentleman in the modern world
Pet a porter: posh pet pampering

Pet a porter: posh pet pampering

The duo behind Asos and Achica have launched a new venture offering haute couture to help make furry companions fashionable