England vs India fourth Test: Stuart Broad’s nose injury makes him a doubt for the final Test

Broad failed to appear after being struck in the face

Old Trafford, Manchester

Alastair Cook celebrated one of the most remarkable turnarounds of his cricket career after England beat India despite losing Stuart Broad to a suspected broken nose.

Broad was struck by a short delivery from Varun Aaron and is now a doubt for the fifth Test at The Oval, which starts in five days’ time. He did not bowl in India’s second innings and Jimmy Anderson was also struggling with illness, but despite their reduced participation, England still blew the tourists away to wrap up the match in three days and move 2-1 ahead in the Investec Series with just one match to play.

Broad was taken to hospital after the ball sneaked through the gap between the grille and the visor on his helmet and left blood pouring from a wound on the bridge of his nose. He was not around to collect his man-of-the-match award and now faces a struggle to be fit for The Oval. Ayrtek, the manufactures of his headgear, did not respond to requests for a comment.

“It’s amazing,” said Cook, whose position as captain looked under threat after defeat in the second Test at Lord’s last month. “It’s why you hang in during the tough times and why you appreciate the good times. We had a really tough six months, losing series to Australia and Sri Lanka, and so to win two Tests back to back is great.

“Stuart Broad has a broken nose so we will have to wait and see whether he will be fit for The Oval. Fingers crossed he does not have a cheek fracture. We wish him well and hope it hasn’t ruined his good looks.

“Jimmy was really under the weather, too, and we had to drag him out of bed to play today. It was great to see him bowl 23 overs. I’m very lucky to captain those two. They very rarely get it wrong and they’ve learned how to bowl well in all conditions.”

India were only one wicket down at tea but lost their next nine in less than two hours for the addition of just 108 runs. Moeen Ali, the bowling hero of the third Test at Southampton, did the damage again here, claiming four for 13 in one spell of 37 deliveries in the final session.

This is only Moeen’s sixth Test and Cook paid tribute to the strides he has made. “I’ve never seen a bloke work as hard as Moeen, or make such improvements in such a short space of time. He has really learned how to bowl in international cricket.”

It was very poor stuff from India, however. How their world has turned around since they took the lead in this series with a superb win at Lord’s in the second Test last month. England will now consider themselves strong favourites to finish off the series in style when the final match of the five begins at The Oval on Friday.

At one stage on the first morning of this Test India were eight for four and life never improved for them after that. Captain MS Dhoni said: “We need to put runs on the board in the first innings.”

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