Fleming foils West Indies

After their scare in the First Test, in which they scraped home by just 27 runs, New Zealand have taken command of the Second Test after two days.

Even in the absence of their leading strike bowler, Shane Bond, who was man of the match in Auckland and who removed Brian Lara cheaply with the one ball he bowled to the champion left-hander in each innings there, the West Indies could only muster 192 on winning the toss here.

The left-arm swing bowler James Franklin counted Lara as one of his five victims, caught at slip for one, his third single-figure score in his three innings of the series so far.

The New Zealand innings started in dramatic fashion with the openers Hamish Marshall and Jamie How falling to the last ball of the second over and the first of the third to leave the home side on 3 for 2. But New Zealand recovered to be 335 for 7 at the close, a healthy lead of 143 against opponents who are, as ever, prone to disintegration.

The revival was orchestrated by the New Zealand captain, Stephen Fleming. The elegant left-hander, playing in his 98th Test and his 74th as captain, compiled a stroke-filled 97, from 131 balls with a six and 15 fours. "I decided that after I had stuttered my way through 70s, 80s, 90s just to be positive. Live by the sword die by the sword," Fleming said. "It was disappointing to get out and a bit unexpected but by being positive you get lucky and I certainly had a bit of that."

Fleming and Peter Fulton, a tall, erect right-hander playing in only his second Test, shared a partnership of 163 before the captain, who offered chances at 47 and 81, was caught at third man cutting the fiery Fidel Edwards.

Fulton was badly missed off Chris Gayle's off-spin at mid-off at 23 and proceeded to 75. When he was out to the first ball after tea, it triggered a brief collapse in which three wickets fell for 39 to the energetic fast bowler Daren Powell.

But the West Indies could not press home their advantage and Nathan Astle, unbeaten on 65 at the close, and Daniel Vettori, caught at mid-on off Edwards in the closing minutes for 42, frustrated them with a seventh-wicket stand of 86.

"We may have been a bit too agressive but once again we have found ourselves in a position of strength," Fleming said. "If we put another 60 on, a 200-run lead is very handy and a good position to be in."

Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Caption competition
Caption competition
Latest stories from i100
Daily Quiz
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
SPONSORED FEATURES
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

Career Services

Day In a Page

A groundbreaking study of 'Britain's Atlantis' long buried at the bottom of the North Sea could revolutionise how we see our prehistoric past

Britain's Atlantis

Scientific study beneath North Sea could revolutionise how we see the past
The Queen has 'done and said nothing that anybody will remember,' says Starkey

The Queen has 'done and said nothing that anybody will remember'

David Starkey's assessment
Oliver Sacks said his life has been 'an enormous privilege and adventure'

'An enormous privilege and adventure'

Oliver Sacks writing about his life
'Gibraltar is British, and it is going to stay British forever'

'Gibraltar is British, and it is going to stay British forever'

The Rock's Chief Minister hits back at Spanish government's 'lies'
Britain is still addicted to 'dirty coal'

Britain still addicted to 'dirty' coal

Biggest energy suppliers are more dependent on fossil fuel than a decade ago
Orthorexia nervosa: How becoming obsessed with healthy eating can lead to malnutrition

Orthorexia nervosa

How becoming obsessed with healthy eating can lead to malnutrition
Lady Chatterley is not obscene, says TV director

Lady Chatterley’s Lover

Director Jed Mercurio on why DH Lawrence's novel 'is not an obscene story'
Farmers in tropical forests are training ants to kill off bigger pests

Set a pest to catch a pest

Farmers in tropical forests are training ants to kill off bigger pests
Mexico: A culture that celebrates darkness as an essential part of life

The dark side of Mexico

A culture that celebrates darkness as an essential part of life
Being sexually assaulted was not your fault, Chrissie Hynde. Don't tell other victims it was theirs

Being sexually assaulted was not your fault, Chrissie Hynde

Please don't tell other victims it was theirs
A nap a day could save your life - and here's why

A nap a day could save your life

A midday nap is 'associated with reduced blood pressure'
If men are so obsessed by sex, why do they clam up when confronted with the grisly realities?

If men are so obsessed by sex...

...why do they clam up when confronted with the grisly realities?
The comedy titans of Avalon on their attempt to save BBC3

Jon Thoday and Richard Allen-Turner

The comedy titans of Avalon on their attempt to save BBC3
The bathing machine is back... but with a difference

Rolling in the deep

The bathing machine is back but with a difference
Part-privatised tests, new age limits, driverless cars: Tories plot motoring revolution

Conservatives plot a motoring revolution

Draft report reveals biggest reform to regulations since driving test introduced in 1935