Flower hits out at 'weak' ICC for bowing to India over DRS

Coach fears the inability to appeal lbw decisions will cost England in the series, as Tremlett injury puts Bresnan in the frame

England yesterday accused the International Cricket Council of weak leadership. If this was hardly an extraordinary criticism, it was made with the support of several errors which might have cost them victory in the first Test against India.

As England drove home their advantage at Lord's on Monday, they were twice dangerously delayed by the denial of appeals which would have been upheld by the Decision Review System. But a diluted version of the procedure, which is being used in this series after the ICC changed its agreed policy, means that no lbw verdicts can be challenged in any of the four matches, the second of which begins in Nottingham on Friday.

Andy Flower, England's coach, agreed that it could come to hit England hard later in the series. "We almost saw it happen in this Test match," he said. "It would have been wrong if the outcome of the game had been seriously affected by a couple of those decisions and it was quite right that, luckily, we did continue to create chances. It's unsatisfactory the way it is, there is no doubt about that."

India's resistance to DRS persuaded the ICC at its annual gathering in Hong Kong earlier this month to revoke its previous policy, which had been unanimously agreed by its cricket committee. Many of India's leading players, most notably Sachin Tendulkar, are known to be suspicious of the predictive ball-tracking technology Hawk-Eye which has transformed decision-making.

"I don't think there's anything we can do," said Flower. "I think the ICC should be stronger in taking a lead on these issues. They are the world governing body and they should lead. I don't think it's unfair to say they haven't led on this topic."

England expect India to come back at them hard this week with or without DRS. Flower said they do not anticipate going through the series, without making changes. It would not be a total surprise if Tim Bresnan were to play in the second Test at Trent Bridge.

Well though Chris Tremlett bowled in the 196-run win at Lord's, in common with the other bowlers, he was clearly struggling with a niggle in the lower part of his leg at times. England will be reluctant to go into the match without him but their fears of doing so will also be eased by Stuart Broad's rediscovered form.

Flower said: "I would be very surprised if that XI plays as it is for the rest of the series with the workload on the fast bowlers especially. I don't think any of them would say they are 100 per cent, because they have bowled a lot of overs in this game at great intensity and that takes it out of you. They are all recuperating now and we will see how they pull up."

It was Broad who suffered with two rejected lbw appeals as the match reached a climax at Lord's. Shortly after lunch, the umpire Billy Bowden turned down an appeal against Sachin Tendulkar. It looked out to the naked eye and Hawk-Eye showed it would have hit the top of off stump. Had England been able to review it, the decision would have been changed.

Later in the match, Suresh Raina, India's last point of resistance, was beaten by Broad but Bowden again shook his head. This time, it seems, he thought the ball hit the bat first. But the replay showed it hit the pad and would have hit middle stump halfway up. "We all know that it is not going to be 100 per cent, but we also know you get more right decisions using it," said Flower. "So let's not quibble about millimetres here when we know you get more right than wrong and that's why most Test-playing nations want to use it."

Flower confirmed that Monty Panesar had bowled in the nets at Lord's to Tendulkar before the Test match, and said it was naive and would not be happening again.

  • Get to the point
Latest stories from i100
Daily Quiz
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

Career Services

Day In a Page

The saffron censorship that governs India: Why national pride and religious sentiment trump freedom of expression

The saffron censorship that governs India

Zareer Masani reveals why national pride and religious sentiment trump freedom of expression
Prince Charles' 'black spider' letters to be published 'within weeks'

Prince Charles' 'black spider' letters to be published 'within weeks'

Supreme Court rules Dominic Grieve's ministerial veto was invalid
Distressed Zayn Malik fans are cutting themselves - how did fandom get so dark?

How did fandom get so dark?

Grief over Zayn Malik's exit from One Direction seemed amusing until stories of mass 'cutting' emerged. Experts tell Gillian Orr the distress is real, and the girls need support
The galaxy collisions that shed light on unseen parallel Universe

The cosmic collisions that have shed light on unseen parallel Universe

Dark matter study gives scientists insight into mystery of space
The Swedes are adding a gender-neutral pronoun to their dictionary

Swedes introduce gender-neutral pronoun

Why, asks Simon Usborne, must English still struggle awkwardly with the likes of 's/he' and 'they'?
Disney's mega money-making formula: 'Human' remakes of cartoon classics are part of a lucrative, long-term creative plan

Disney's mega money-making formula

'Human' remakes of cartoon classics are part of a lucrative, long-term creative plan
Lobster has gone mainstream with supermarket bargains for £10 or less - but is it any good?

Lobster has gone mainstream

Anthea Gerrie, raised on meaty specimens from the waters around Maine, reveals how to cook up an affordable feast
Easter 2015: 14 best decorations

14 best Easter decorations

Get into the Easter spirit with our pick of accessories, ornaments and tableware
Paul Scholes column: Gareth Bale would be a perfect fit at Manchester United and could turn them into serious title contenders next season

Paul Scholes column

Gareth Bale would be a perfect fit at Manchester United and could turn them into serious title contenders next season
Inside the Kansas greenhouses where Monsanto is 'playing God' with the future of the planet

The future of GM

The greenhouses where Monsanto 'plays God' with the future of the planet
Britain's mild winters could be numbered: why global warming is leaving UK chillier

Britain's mild winters could be numbered

Gulf Stream is slowing down faster than ever, scientists say
Government gives £250,000 to Independent appeal

Government gives £250,000 to Independent appeal

Donation brings total raised by Homeless Veterans campaign to at least £1.25m
Oh dear, the most borrowed book at Bank of England library doesn't inspire confidence

The most borrowed book at Bank of England library? Oh dear

The book's fifth edition is used for Edexcel exams
Cowslips vs honeysuckle: The hunt for the UK’s favourite wildflower

Cowslips vs honeysuckle

It's the hunt for UK’s favourite wildflower
Child abuse scandal: Did a botched blackmail attempt by South African intelligence help Cyril Smith escape justice?

Did a botched blackmail attempt help Cyril Smith escape justice?

A fresh twist reveals the Liberal MP was targeted by the notorious South African intelligence agency Boss