Hair calls for ICC bosses to quit

Darrell Hair is calling for the resignation of International Cricket Council president David Morgan - and other senior figures - over their handling of the controversy which dogged the Oval Test in 2006.

The ICC decided last weekend to revise an earlier ruling that England's victory over Pakistan should be taken out of the record books and replaced as a draw.

"All the board members who were involved in the earlier decision should resign now," Hair has told Australia's Daily Telegraph.

"This should also include the present ICC president David Morgan. The first to go should be David Richardson [the ICC's general manager - cricket) and Doug Cowie [the ICC's manager for umpires]."

The furore began when Hair and his on-field colleague Billy Doctrove declared in August 2006 that Pakistan had forfeited the match because Inzamam-ul-Haq's team declined to take the field after tea on day four.

The stand-off followed the umpires' decision to award England five runs as a penalty against ball-tampering by the tourists.

Inzamam was subsequently banned for four one-day internationals but exonerated over ball-tampering - and several months later, the ICC commuted England's victory to a draw.

That was barely half the saga, though - Hair undertaking and then abandoning legal action against the world governing body after they revealed he had offered to resign in return for 500,000 US dollars. He was initially stripped of his duties as an elite international umpire, was eventually reinstated last year but has since stepped down again.

"I felt the gun was loaded by the ICC board, and Richardson and [then chief executive] Malcolm Speed were only too happy to pull the trigger," Hair added.

"They tried to destroy my life.

"After the ICC made the decision, several ICC officials set out to make a real meal of it and make life very tough for me.

"People like myself pay for standing up for what is right. There was a lot of support for me from around the world - but unfortunately none of the people who worked at the ICC were among them. I don't like the fact that none of the people who worked there backed me up."

The 56-year-old Australian, now chief executive New South Wales Cricket Umpires and Scorers Association, claims he no longer wants to revisit the controversy.

"I want to forget the past now. I am happily living in Sydney," he said.

An ICC spokesman today declined to comment on Hair's latest remarks.