'It's important to get on the honours board'

Paul Collingwood had every right to sit back on his laurels last night after scoring his second Test century and getting on the famous honours board in the home dressing-room at Lord's.

But instead the gritty North-easterner was planning on giving the beleaguered Pakistan attack more of the same when the first Test resumes today.

"I feel more secure about my place in the team," said the 30-year-old Collingwood after four and a half hours at the crease during which time he and his fellow centurion, Alastair Cook, piled up a record fourth-wicket partnership for England against Pakistan, a mark now standing at 221.

"But I know that I am always playing for my place. You do that all the time. And tomorrow we have to go out there and be as ruthless as we can be."

Yet the Durham all-rounder, who scored his maiden Test hundred in the first Test against India in Nagpur in March, is clearly enjoying the fact that he has earned a place on the famed honours board at cricket's HQ.

"We had talked about it a couple of days ago, how it would be great to get a hundred here. My maiden century was good but there is a difference between playing in Nagpur and playing at Lord's. Lord's is a special place and it is important getting up on that board."

There were odd dodgy moments in the pair's partnership, not least when Cook, who scored his maiden hundred in the second innings at Nagpur, was on a nervous and seemingly everlasting 99.

Eventually, Collingwood appeared to almost force the Essex youngster into taking that all-important single in the penultimate over, risking being run out himself. Cook explained: "It was terrible. I don't know what happened with that single. I thought God he's [Collingwood's] quick. I didn't even look back to see if he'd made it. But he pissed it."

He also acknowledged that he could have fallen without a run to his name. "I should have been out on nought," he said referring to the awful mess that the Pakistani slips got into when second slip ­ Imran Farhat ­ dived across first, unsighting him. "But you have to cash in your luck, make the most of it."

Neither Collingwood nor Cook wanted to dwell too long on their exploits, Cook saying: "It is still only the first day. We wanted to get off to a good start but we need some more good days now."

As for Pakistan ­ who overnight had lost the services of Younis Khan, their specialist fielder at second slip, to injury ­ they were left ruing missed chances. He was replaced by the inexperienced Imran, who contrived to drop three chances, two of them very straightforward ones.

Waqar Younis, the Pakistan bowling coach, admitted that his side's fielding display ­ five simple catches were put down ­ had cost them dearly.

"We bowled really well but unfortunately the fielders didn't really support much," he said. "This is the first time a lot of the boys have played at Lord's so there were a lot of tense bodies. I thought they did well.

"Lord's has its own mysteries and it can make you tense. We have been catching really well but it's here in England it can be difficult, because the ball swings after it passes the stumps. It takes a while to get used to the conditions. We also missed Younis Khan, who is a very safe pair of hands. "

Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Caption competition
Caption competition
Latest stories from i100
Daily Quiz
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
SPONSORED FEATURES
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

Career Services

Day In a Page

Orthorexia nervosa: How becoming obsessed with healthy eating can lead to malnutrition

Orthorexia nervosa

How becoming obsessed with healthy eating can lead to malnutrition
Lady Chatterley is not obscene, says TV director

Lady Chatterley’s Lover

Director Jed Mercurio on why DH Lawrence's novel 'is not an obscene story'
Farmers in tropical forests are training ants to kill off bigger pests

Set a pest to catch a pest

Farmers in tropical forests are training ants to kill off bigger pests
Mexico: A culture that celebrates darkness as an essential part of life

The dark side of Mexico

A culture that celebrates darkness as an essential part of life
Being sexually assaulted was not your fault, Chrissie Hynde. Don't tell other victims it was theirs

Being sexually assaulted was not your fault, Chrissie Hynde

Please don't tell other victims it was theirs
A nap a day could save your life - and here's why

A nap a day could save your life

A midday nap is 'associated with reduced blood pressure'
If men are so obsessed by sex, why do they clam up when confronted with the grisly realities?

If men are so obsessed by sex...

...why do they clam up when confronted with the grisly realities?
The comedy titans of Avalon on their attempt to save BBC3

Jon Thoday and Richard Allen-Turner

The comedy titans of Avalon on their attempt to save BBC3
The bathing machine is back... but with a difference

Rolling in the deep

The bathing machine is back but with a difference
Part-privatised tests, new age limits, driverless cars: Tories plot motoring revolution

Conservatives plot a motoring revolution

Draft report reveals biggest reform to regulations since driving test introduced in 1935
The Silk Roads that trace civilisation: Long before the West rose to power, Asian pathways were connecting peoples and places

The Silk Roads that trace civilisation

Long before the West rose to power, Asian pathways were connecting peoples and places
House of Lords: Outcry as donors, fixers and MPs caught up in expenses scandal are ennobled

The honours that shame Britain

Outcry as donors, fixers and MPs caught up in expenses scandal are ennobled
When it comes to street harassment, we need to talk about race

'When it comes to street harassment, we need to talk about race'

Why are black men living the stereotypes and why are we letting them get away with it?
International Tap Festival: Forget Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers - this dancing is improvised, spontaneous and rhythmic

International Tap Festival comes to the UK

Forget Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers - this dancing is improvised, spontaneous and rhythmic
War with Isis: Is Turkey's buffer zone in Syria a matter of self-defence – or just anti-Kurd?

Turkey's buffer zone in Syria: self-defence – or just anti-Kurd?

Ankara accused of exacerbating racial division by allowing Turkmen minority to cross the border