James Corrigan: Pause button only delays the inevitable

What are the ICC scared of? A decision that means criticism of the cock-eye in the sky?

Sport can thank the befuddled horse-racing stewards of the 1930s – and just maybe their fondness for a post-lunch tipple – for beginning the ever-quickening trend to sort out the rows, controversies and interminable inquests by resorting to technology. The old boys clearly became heartedly fed up with lurching out of their boxes to discover legions of angry punters waiting, keen to discuss the afternoon's tight call.

So they commanded the bods to erect their cameras on the line and "hey, presto", the photo finish was born and the death threats dried up. The advent was an instant (Kodak) success and obviously, it would not be too long before the moving-picture revolution allowed other sports to follow their example. Except it was.

Here we are seven decades later and the International Cricket Council was declaring yesterday that oh, hum, they think more trials are needed before they introduce all this new-fangled nonsense. After all one should never rush these things. To be fair, enough confusion probably did arise in recent trial Test series – not least in England's defeat in the West Indies – to warrant some heavy tinkering but why not learn on the job?

Isn't it slightly disrespectful to all the other nations even to throw the suggestion in the air that the Ashes is far too sacred to guinea-pig? What are they scared of? A series-deciding decision that leads to headlines criticising the cock-eye in the sky?

The ICC should be advised that the replay rumpuses will arise, whenever they introduce it "officially". Ask Mark Cueto or any of the nearby England players in the 2007 rugby union World Cup final and they will still swear that the wing scored what would have proved the trophy-lifting try. The technology was not conclusive then, and if it had not been available the try likely would have been awarded, Brian Ashton would now be a Sir and who knows, even a national coach... Sport is not, the shrink manuals confirm, a game of perfection. The camera may not lie but it cannot tell the whole truth. What it does is come closer than the human brain, as proven by the results of this cricketing experiment, which improved the rate of correct decisions from 94 to 98 per cent. Furthermore the slowing-the-game-down argument is absurd in a five-day marathon.

The "upstairs" referrals have helped both rugby codes, tennis and most American sports. Cricket may have so many grey areas, but this still appears black and white. The ICC is simply pressing the pause button on the inevitable. But then, it could be worse. It could be Fifa or Uefa.

Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Caption competition
Caption competition
  • Get to the point
Latest stories from i100
Daily Quiz
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

Career Services

Day In a Page

Revealed: Why Mohammed Emwazi chose the 'safe option' of fighting for Isis, rather than following his friends to al-Shabaab in Somalia

Why Mohammed Emwazi chose Isis

His friends were betrayed and killed by al-Shabaab
'The solution can never be to impassively watch on while desperate people drown'
An open letter to David Cameron: Building fortress Europe has had deadly results

Open letter to David Cameron

Building the walls of fortress Europe has had deadly results
Tory candidates' tweets not as 'spontaneous' as they seem - you don't say!

You don't say!

Tory candidates' election tweets not as 'spontaneous' as they appear
Mubi: Netflix for people who want to stop just watching trash

So what is Mubi?

Netflix for people who want to stop just watching trash all the time
The impossible job: how to follow Kevin Spacey?

The hardest job in theatre?

How to follow Kevin Spacey
Armenian genocide: To continue to deny the truth of this mass human cruelty is close to a criminal lie

Armenian genocide and the 'good Turks'

To continue to deny the truth of this mass human cruelty is close to a criminal lie
Lou Reed: The truth about the singer's upbringing beyond the biographers' and memoirists' myths

'Lou needed care, but what he got was ECT'

The truth about the singer's upbringing beyond
Migrant boat disaster: This human tragedy has been brewing for four years and EU states can't say they were not warned

This human tragedy has been brewing for years

EU states can't say they were not warned
Women's sportswear: From tackling a marathon to a jog in the park, the right kit can help

Women's sportswear

From tackling a marathon to a jog in the park, the right kit can help
Hillary Clinton's outfits will be as important as her policies in her presidential bid

Clinton's clothes

Like it or not, her outfits will be as important as her policies
NHS struggling to monitor the safety and efficacy of its services outsourced to private providers

Who's monitoring the outsourced NHS services?

A report finds that private firms are not being properly assessed for their quality of care
Zac Goldsmith: 'I'll trigger a by-election over Heathrow'

Zac Goldsmith: 'I'll trigger a by-election over Heathrow'

The Tory MP said he did not want to stand again unless his party's manifesto ruled out a third runway. But he's doing so. Watch this space
How do Greek voters feel about Syriza's backtracking on its anti-austerity pledge?

How do Greeks feel about Syriza?

Five voters from different backgrounds tell us what they expect from Syriza's charismatic leader Alexis Tsipras
From Iraq to Libya and Syria: The wars that come back to haunt us

The wars that come back to haunt us

David Cameron should not escape blame for his role in conflicts that are still raging, argues Patrick Cockburn
Sam Baker and Lauren Laverne: Too busy to surf? Head to The Pool

Too busy to surf? Head to The Pool

A new website is trying to declutter the internet to help busy women. Holly Williams meets the founders