Jonathan Trott and Ashley Giles given ringing endorsements to rebuild England career after winter to forget

Trott departed the ill-fated Ashes Tour with a stress-related illness which he later said was 'burnout' but Warwickshire coach Dougie Brown has given his backing to both men

Jonathan Trott and Ashley Giles each needs to restate England credentials to be centre stage again this summer.

But neither could hope for a more heart-felt endorsement of his talents than the one provided by Warwickshire coach Dougie Brown.

Trott must wait until next week in The Parks to demonstrate he is back in the groove as a batsman, having made just four in his first innings since flying home early from the Ashes with a stress-related illness last November.

It was hoped he might get a second chance in his comeback match, Warwickshire's two-day friendly against Gloucestershire, but instead Trott was confined to the dressing-room while openers Laurie Evans and Will Porterfield were granted an hour's batting at Edgbaston before rain arrived and eventually forced an abandonment.

Bears coach Brown nonetheless saw enough, in Trott's 19-ball stay in the middle on Tuesday, and his demeanour in practice, to be confident England's Test number three is in fine shape again.

"Everybody in the country will be judging it on how many runs he scores in the first few championship matches," he said.

"Personally, I'm judging it by how he is around the dressing-room ... how buoyant he is, how enthusiastic and how much willingness he has to go out there and work really hard.

"He gets a massive tick for all of that from me.

"The runs - which everybody I'm sure will want to see, to confirm whether he has rehabilitated fully - will be a by-product of the stuff we're seeing at the moment."

While runs must be Trott's currency if he is to return for next month's opening one-day international against Scotland in Aberdeen, Giles will need to choose the right words at interview to broaden his England brief to that of head coach.

That is the situation vacant, and one which looked sure to be Giles' until - on his watch as limited-overs coach - England concluded their miserable winter with an embarrassing defeat against minnows Holland at the ICC World Twenty20 two days ago.

Yet Brown is convinced his former team-mate is the right man to succeed Andy Flower for England, having already demonstrated his coaching abilities by bringing the county title to Edgbaston two years ago.

"He's a top bloke," he said.

"He's done really well at Warwickshire, and not just in 2012 when we won the Championship."

Brown also believes Giles responded well in adversity to England's defeat in Chittagong.

"I think Ash handled the press really well at the back end of the Dutch game - which by his own admission wasn't acceptable," he said.

"I would like to see Ash get a proper crack at it and have a proper run at getting his own squad of players and the infrastructure, as we did at Warwickshire.

"Getting a wounded England side would be a great opportunity to do that.

"All I know is if he got an opportunity to be the team director he would do a really good job."

He also expects Trott, who will make his first-class return to action against Oxford University next Monday, to start proving his class again soon.

"We're delighted he's with us in the frame of mind he's in at the moment," he said.

"He's been brilliant. His work ethic, practice has been fantastic - and he's great in the dressing-room.

"The last four months haven't been the way he'd like it to have been ... but he's in a very good space, and I'm really happy he is.

"I'll be really happy if he does get into that England set-up, because it will mean he's performed really well for Warwickshire."

After England's Ashes drubbing, and its messy aftermath, Trott will not be the only player who needs to earn selection this summmer.

"Lots of positions that will be competed for ... on the back of the winter," said Brown.

"Trotty is just another name that goes into that pot of players."

In the meantime, all at Warwickshire are doing all they can to help smooth Trott's progress.

"There's a lot of banter that goes on in the dressing-room, and you'd think something was wrong if that stopped," he said.

"It hasn't stopped.

"Clearly everyone was concerned for Trotty on the back of the winter.

"We're pretty lucky we've got quite a caring, empathetic dressing-room - guys who actually do care about the guy sitting next to them.

"For me, that's really important."

PA

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