Kemar Roach hat-trick helps West Indies beat Netherlands

Kemar Roach claimed a hat-trick to back up fine half-centuries from Chris Gayle and Kieron Pollard as West Indies cruised to a 215-run victory over Holland in their World Cup Group B match in Delhi today.

Paceman Roach, who tormented the hapless Holland batsmen throughout his impressive spell, picked up six wickets for 27 runs in 8.3 overs to bundle out Holland for 115 inside 32 overs.



Big-hitting duo Gayle (80 off 110 balls) and Pollard (60 off 27 balls) bludgeoned the lacklustre Holland attack to pile up 330 for eight.



Batting first after losing the toss, West Indies got off to a good start racing to 100 in 16.3 overs with both Smith and Gayle dominating the lacklustre attack.



Bernard Loots gave Holland the breakthrough by dismissing Smith (53 off 51 balls), but Gayle dropped anchor and built crucial stands first with and Darren Bravo and then with Ramnaresh Sarwan.



The Windies accelerated after taking their batting powerplay adding 56 in 30 balls but lost Gayle for 80, including seven fours and two sixes.



It was carnage thereafter as Pollard and Sarwan unleashed a flurry of fours and sixes adding 65 in 35 balls and the Holland had a brief respite when Sarwan was dismissed by Berend Westdijk for a 42-ball 49.



A double strike from Pieter Seelaar saw off Darren Sammy (six) and Shivnarine Chanderpaul (four), but soon Pollard blitzed to 50 off just 23 balls.



The big-hitting Trinidadian hit five fours and four sixes before being dismissed by Mudassar Bukhari towards the end of the innings.



In reply, Holland struggled from the start losing the first four wickets inside 10 overs with just 35 on the board.



Roach picked up Wesley Barresi and and Bas Zuiderent while spinner Sulieman Benn accounted for Alex Kervezee (14) and dangerman Ryan ten Doeschate (seven).



Benn got his third wicket when his lbw appeal against Tom de Grooth was upheld after a review to leave Holland tottering on 36 for five.



The sixth wicket stand between Tom Cooper and Peter Borren added 20 in eight overs before the Holland captain was snared by his counterpart Sammy for 10.



Cooper and new batsman Bukhari defied the Windies for the next 11 overs and added 57, but Roach provided the breakthrough by bowling Bukhari (24 off 42) through the gate.



Cooper, who reached his sixth ODI half-century off 67 balls, was joined by Seelaar, but became the first of the three wickets which gave Roach the first hat-trick of this World Cup.



Roach trapped Seelaar and his replacement Loots lbw before knocking over the middle-stump of last man Berend Westdijk to complete the hat-trick and bowl out Holland for 115 as Cooper remained unbeaten on 55 off 72 balls.



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