Kieswetter shows unqualified skill

Round-up

After Jonathan Trott, stand by for another South African soon to appear on England's radar – the Somerset wicketkeeper Craig Kieswetter.

The 21-year-old from Johannesburg, like Trott a South Africa Under-19 international but in his case based in the United Kingdom since arriving at Millfield School in 2006, will qualify for England by residence in February. He is being monitored closely by the national selector, Geoff Miller.

A bold and adventurous shot-maker who has been likened to another South African, Kevin Pietersen, Kieswetter averaged 65.83 in this season's Friends Provident Trophy and scored 248 runs in the Twenty20 Cup, in which he also made four stumpings. Yesterday, as a high-scoring match with Sussex at Taunton ended in a draw, he took his first-class aggregate for the season to 834 runs at 55.60 with an unbeaten 135, his third century of the campaign.

Mal Loye hit an unbeaten 84 as Lancashire drew the Roses match at Headingley, where Yorkshire's leg-spinning all-rounder, Adil Rashid, scored a career-best, unbeaten 157.

Having bowled Yorkshire out for 429, conceding a lead of 153, Lancashire had a double escape just before lunch when Loye and Paul Horton were dropped in the same Tim Bresnan over. Horton went for 28 when he edged Rashid but Loye and VVS Laxman, with 65, put on 131 before the sides agreed to an early finish.

The Pakistan leg-spinner Danish Kaneria took 6 for 50 to set up an Essex victory over Surrey in Division Two at Colchester. After Ravi Bopara's double century had enabled the home side to overhaul Surrey's 428 for a lead of 117, Kaneria combined with the left-arm spinner Tim Phillips, who took 3 for 61, to dismiss Surrey for 190. Essex reached their target, 74, for the loss of one wicket.

Gloucestershire made a brave effort to chase 364 before slipping to a 44-run defeat against Leicestershire at Grace Road.

Having resumed at 133 for 5, 231 runs behind, their chance looked to have gone before the New Zealand all-rounder James Franklin and the off-spinner Richard Dawson staged a 98-run partnership for the seventh wicket. However, Gloucestershire lost Ian Saxelby and Jon Lewis in the space of nine balls and though Steve Kirby blocked 23 deliveries in an attempt to save the draw, he was bowled by the off-spinner Jigar Naik and Leicestershire secured a second win of the season.

One veteran former England off-spinner got the better of another as Glamorgan beat Middlesex by 23 runs at Swansea. The 40-year-old Shaun Udal took 6 for 36 to bowl out the home side for 135 in their second innings, only for the 39-year-old Robert Croft to take 5 for 65 as Middlesex, chasing 191, collapsed from 98 for 3 to 167 all out.

Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Caption competition
Caption competition
Latest stories from i100
Daily Quiz
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

Career Services

Day In a Page

The difference between America and Israel? There isn’t one

The difference between America and Israel? There isn’t one

Netanyahu knows he can get away with anything in America, says Robert Fisk
Families clubbing together to build their own affordable accommodation

Do It Yourself approach to securing a new house

Community land trusts marking a new trend for taking the initiative away from developers
Head of WWF UK: We didn’t send Cameron to the Arctic to see green ideas freeze

David Nussbaum: We didn’t send Cameron to the Arctic to see green ideas freeze

The head of WWF UK remains sanguine despite the Government’s failure to live up to its pledges on the environment
Author Kazuo Ishiguro on being inspired by shoot-outs and samurai

Author Kazuo Ishiguro on being inspired by shoot-outs and samurai

Set in a mythologised 5th-century Britain, ‘The Buried Giant’ is a strange beast
With money, corruption and drugs, this monk fears Buddhism in Thailand is a ‘poisoned fruit’

Money, corruption and drugs

The monk who fears Buddhism in Thailand is a ‘poisoned fruit’
America's first slavery museum established at Django Unchained plantation - 150 years after slavery outlawed

150 years after it was outlawed...

... America's first slavery museum is established in Louisiana
Kelly Clarkson: How I snubbed Simon Cowell and become a Grammy-winning superstar

Kelly Clarkson: How I snubbed Simon Cowell and become a Grammy-winning superstar

The first 'American Idol' winner on how she manages to remain her own woman – Jane Austen fascination and all
Tony Oursler on exploring our uneasy relationship with technology with his new show

You won't believe your eyes

Tony Oursler's new show explores our uneasy relationship with technology. He's one of a growing number of artists with that preoccupation
Ian Herbert: Peter Moores must go. He should never have been brought back to fail again

Moores must go. He should never have been brought back to fail again

The England coach leaves players to find solutions - which makes you wonder where he adds value, says Ian Herbert
War with Isis: Fears that the looming battle for Mosul will unleash 'a million refugees'

The battle for Mosul will unleash 'a million refugees'

Aid agencies prepare for vast exodus following planned Iraqi offensive against the Isis-held city, reports Patrick Cockburn
Yvette Cooper: We can't lose the election. There's too much on the line

Yvette Cooper: We can't lose the election. There's too much on the line

The shadow Home Secretary on fighting radical Islam, protecting children, and why anyone in Labour who's thinking beyond May must 'sort themselves out'
A bad week for the Greens: Leader Natalie Bennett's 'car crash' radio interview is followed by Brighton council's failure to set a budget due to infighting

It's not easy being Green

After a bad week in which its leader had a public meltdown and its only city council couldn't agree on a budget vote, what next for the alternative party? It's over to Caroline Lucas to find out
Gorillas nearly missed: BBC producers didn't want to broadcast Sir David Attenborough's famed Rwandan encounter

Gorillas nearly missed

BBC producers didn't want to broadcast Sir David Attenborough's famed Rwandan encounter
Downton Abbey effect sees impoverished Italian nobles inspired to open their doors to paying guests for up to €650 a night

The Downton Abbey effect

Impoverished Italian nobles are opening their doors to paying guests, inspired by the TV drama
China's wild panda numbers have increased by 17% since 2003, new census reveals

China's wild panda numbers on the up

New census reveals 17% since 2003