KP leads England to series whitewash

 

Kevin Pietersen's second successive one-day international hundred carried England to a four-wicket victory, and 4-0 series whitewash of Pakistan.

Pietersen (130), without an ODI century for more than three years before his unbeaten 111 three days ago, repeated the dose for a career-best in another run chase under lights.

The outcome was in doubt for much longer this time, after a rare failure from Alastair Cook immediately put England's pursuit of 237 all out on the back foot.

But Pietersen appeared in control throughout in a 153-ball innings, which contained 12 fours and two sixes, as England got the job done with four balls to spare at the Dubai International Cricket Stadium.

He established a scoring rate that kept England ahead of the game, even from a precarious 68 for four after 16 overs, to the extent that Pietersen and Craig Kieswetter's fifth-wicket stand of 109 did not have to feature undue risks against Pakistan's spinners.

The whitewash, England's first against Pakistan for 25 years, was compensation of sorts for the 3-0 Test series drubbing these opponents inflicted on them here this winter.

Shortly after the victory the International Cricket Council confirmed England had moved ahead of Pakistan in the world rankings - further satisfaction after Pietersen and Kieswetter had kept England on track following Jade Dernbach's four wickets for 45 runs.

England lost captain Cook to the second ball of the innings, lbw to Junaid Khan after DRS overturned an initial not-out verdict to a quick and full ball.

Cook, on the back of two hundreds and an 80 in his last three attempts, began with a square-cut for four first ball.

But with him gone, Pietersen soon lost Jonathan Trott too, to an attempted paddle-pull at Abdur Rehman which looped into the leg side for a simple catch.

Eoin Morgan was lbw sweeping at Saeed Ajmal (three for 62), and debutant Jos Buttler fell to the off-spinner for a second-ball duck - caught at short-leg off the shoulder of a defensive bat.

Pietersen and Kieswetter kept their nerve, though, and demonstrated plenty of skill too against a spin-dominated attack on a used pitch.

Pietersen's one significant scrape came when he had to resort to DRS to disprove another lbw verdict, this time on the basis that - albeit playing a hapless and uncomfortable sweep at Rehman - he had achieved the basic prerequisite of positioning his front pad outside the line of off-stump on impact.

Little went right, in fact, for Pakistan as their fielding let them down again - and England's two South Africa-born batsmen swept and drove them to shreds.

After Kieswetter was run out, scampering back in vain from a faulty attempt at a single, Pietersen muscled some crucial pulls too in a stand of 59 with Samit Patel until he was last out - chipping Ajmal to point with only two runs needed.

Asad Shafiq (65) and Azhar Ali (58) had earlier ensured Pakistan recovered from their own early setback, the dismissal of opener Mohammad Hafeez with just one run on the board after Misbah-ul-Haq had won the toss.

Dernbach struck with only his second delivery, finding the edge to see off Hafeez caught behind, and took two tail-end wickets in his last three balls as England bowled Pakistan out for the fourth successive time.

Yet Shafiq and Azhar soon found boundaries, and strike rotation, easy in a partnership of 111.

The second-wicket pair shared 11 fours in a passage of play interrupted only when Shafiq chopped on, trying to cut Tim Bresnan.

That was the fit-again Yorkshire seamer's first international wicket of 2012, and debutant Danny Briggs had the first of his career when Umar Akmal mistimed straight to long-off.

Dernbach was the catcher, and was soon back in the last column too - with a good delivery which held its line off the pitch and saw Azhar squirt a thick edge to the diving Morgan at point.

Pakistan had to rebuild again, and in new batsmen Misbah and Shoaib Malik they had the wise heads to do just that.

When Misbah clipped Patel past midwicket, it was for Pakistan's first four in 50 balls. But he and Shoaib still gathered a run-a-ball momentum, and Misbah went up the wicket to hoist Patel over long-on for six to bring up the 200 in the 43rd over.

Briggs proved the merit of his tight lines and full length when he had Shoaib lbw sweeping, to end a stand of 58, and England had the best of the last 10 overs - which included six wickets and just 58 runs.

* Patel was today playing his ninth ODI of the winter, and therefore earned an England and Wales Cricket Board increment contract.

PA

News
people'It can last and it's terrifying'
News
people Emma Watson addresses celebrity nude photo leak
Arts and Entertainment
tv
News
Katie Hopkins appearing on 'This Morning' after she purposefully put on 4 stone.
peopleKatie Hopkins breaks down in tears over weight gain challenge
PROMOTED VIDEO
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Life and Style
fashionModel of the moment shoots for first time with catwalk veteran
Sport
football
News
i100
Arts and Entertainment
Olivia Colman topped the list of the 30 most influential females in broadcasting
tv
Life and Style
techIf those brochure kitchens look a little too perfect to be true, well, that’s probably because they are
Life and Style
tech
News
Kelly Brook
peopleA spokesperson said the support group was 'extremely disappointed'
Sport
Andy Murray celebrates a shot while playing Jo-Wilfried Tsonga
TennisWin sets up blockbuster US Open quarter-final against Djokovic
Arts and Entertainment
Hare’s a riddle: Kit Williams with the treasure linked to Masquerade
booksRiddling trilogy could net you $3m
Arts and Entertainment
Alex Kapranos of Franz Ferdinand performs live
music Pro-independence show to take place four days before vote
Caption competition
Caption competition
Latest stories from i100
Daily Quiz
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

Career Services

Day In a Page

'I’ll tell you what I would not serve - lamb and potatoes': US ambassador hits out at stodgy British food served at diplomatic dinners

'I’ll tell you what I would not serve - lamb and potatoes'

US ambassador hits out at stodgy British food
Radio Times female powerlist: A 'revolution' in TV gender roles

A 'revolution' in TV gender roles

Inside the Radio Times female powerlist
Endgame: James Frey's literary treasure hunt

James Frey's literary treasure hunt

Riddling trilogy could net you $3m
Fitbit: Because the tingle feels so good

Fitbit: Because the tingle feels so good

What David Sedaris learnt about the world from his fitness tracker
Saudis risk new Muslim division with proposal to move Mohamed’s tomb

Saudis risk new Muslim division with proposal to move Mohamed’s tomb

Second-holiest site in Islam attracts millions of pilgrims each year
Alexander Fury: The designer names to look for at fashion week this season

The big names to look for this fashion week

This week, designers begin to show their spring 2015 collections in New York
Will Self: 'I like Orwell's writing as much as the next talented mediocrity'

'I like Orwell's writing as much as the next talented mediocrity'

Will Self takes aim at Orwell's rules for writing plain English
Meet Afghanistan's middle-class paint-ballers

Meet Afghanistan's middle-class paint-ballers

Toy guns proving a popular diversion in a country flooded with the real thing
Al Pacino wows Venice

Al Pacino wows Venice

Ham among the brilliance as actor premieres two films at festival
Neil Lawson Baker interview: ‘I’ve gained so much from art. It’s only right to give something back’.

Neil Lawson Baker interview

‘I’ve gained so much from art. It’s only right to give something back’.
The other Mugabe who is lining up for the Zimbabwean presidency

The other Mugabe who is lining up for the Zimbabwean presidency

Wife of President Robert Mugabe appears to have her sights set on succeeding her husband
The model of a gadget launch: Cultivate an atmosphere of mystery and excitement to sell stuff people didn't realise they needed

The model for a gadget launch

Cultivate an atmosphere of mystery and excitement to sell stuff people didn't realise they needed
Alice Roberts: She's done pretty well, for a boffin without a beard

She's done pretty well, for a boffin without a beard

Alice Roberts talks about her new book on evolution - and why her early TV work drew flak from (mostly male) colleagues
Get well soon, Joan Rivers - an inspiration, whether she likes it or not

Get well soon, Joan Rivers

She is awful. But she's also wonderful, not in spite of but because of the fact she's forever saying appalling things, argues Ellen E Jones
Doctor Who Into the Dalek review: A classic sci-fi adventure with all the spectacle of a blockbuster

A fresh take on an old foe

Doctor Who Into the Dalek more than compensated for last week's nonsensical offering