Matthew Hoggard to retire from cricket at the end of the season

Bowler helped England regain the Ashes in 2005

Matthew Hoggard announced his decision to retire at the end of the season today after a career rich in success.

As the Leicestershire bowler looked back over his glittering career, the 2005 Ashes winner reminisced about the beginning of his journey and where it all began, explaining the aspirations he had in his youth:

"I wanted to be a vet. I loved my time with the Pudsey Congs and it was a really happy place for me as a child, but I never thought I was good enough," he told The Independent.

"I played for every team I could but it was just a hobby I did because I loved the sport."

Hoggard, who was awarded an MBE in the 2006 New Year Honours for his role in the Ashes, credits, and thanks, Phil Carrick for his role in advancing the Yorkshireman’s career.

"If it wasn’t for Phil I wouldn’t be where I am today. He was the one who recognised my talent and got me from the third team to the first team and then my pro contract at Yorkshire."

As the millennium came and went, a 23-year-old Hoggard found himself selected for England, joining the likes of Nasser Hussain, Darren Fletcher and Darren Gough. Being selected for your country in any sport is a proud honour, but Hoggy spoke of the help he had from his fellow Yorkshiremen.

"Playing for England was fantastic, it was always a proud moment to play for my country but it was made easier for me because there were already a few lads from Yorkshire there. I can remember sitting in the balcony with my pads on, feeling nervous, watching Darren Gough out there.

"I remember my first catch was straight forward but I still decided to take a dive with it."

As that career continued to bloom and success came in abundance, Hoggard finished a career with many achievements, but when asked if one moment stood out as his biggest career achievement, he simply could not pick one:

"There are too many to just pick one. Obviously being awarded the MBE is up there, it was very bizarre to be given this title for playing cricket but it was great to get the nation back to having cricket in mind."

As Hoggard announced his decision to the world today, he tweeted from his twitter account thanking everyone who has played a part in making his career so enjoyable, but he also made special reference to his wife: "Special thanks go to @mrshoggy602 for been my rock throughout my ride!"

He explained that his career involved "a lot of time spent away from home which was very hard and involves its ups and downs but she was the one who has been steady throughout, ready to celebrate but also to pick up the pieces."

When asked about his plans for retirement, Hoggard’s first contemplation of being a "beach bum" was soon scratched off as a possibility. No plans are set in stone but he is sure that "cricket will play a part somewhere along the line" and that he will just continue to "bring the pieces of the jigsaw together to create a pretty picture."

News
peopleNational cycling charity CTC said he 'should have known better'
News
i100
Life and Style
The fashion retailers have said they will now not place any further orders for the slim mannequin
fashion
Arts and Entertainment
Ugne, 32, is a Lithuanian bodybuilder
tvThey include a Lithuanian bodybuilder who believes 'cake is a sin' and the Dalai Lama's personal photographer
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Caption competition
Caption competition
Latest stories from i100
Daily Quiz
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
SPONSORED FEATURES
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

Career Services

Day In a Page

Solved after 200 years: the mysterious deaths of 3,000 soldiers from Napoleon's army

Solved after 200 years

The mysterious deaths of 3,000 soldiers from Napoleon's army
Every regional power has betrayed the Kurds so Turkish bombing is no surprise

Robert Fisk on the Turkey conflict

Every regional power has betrayed the Kurds so Turkish bombing is no surprise
Investigation into wreck of unidentified submarine found off the coast of Sweden

Sunken sub

Investigation underway into wreck of an unidentified submarine found off the coast of Sweden
Instagram and Facebook have 'totally changed' the way people buy clothes

Age of the selfie

Instagram and Facebook have 'totally changed' the way people buy clothes
Not so square: How BBC's Bloomsbury saga is sexing up the period drama

Not so square

How Virginia Woolf saga is sexing up the BBC period drama
Rio Olympics 2016: The seven teenagers still carrying a torch for our Games hopes

Still carrying the torch

The seven teenagers given our Olympic hopes
The West likes to think that 'civilisation' will defeat Isis, but history suggests otherwise

The West likes to think that 'civilisation' will defeat Isis...

...but history suggests otherwise
The bald truth: How one author's thinning hair made him a Wayne Rooney sympathiser

The bald truth

How thinning hair made me a Wayne Rooney sympathiser
Froome wins second Tour de France after triumphant ride into Paris with Team Sky

Tour de France 2015

Froome rides into Paris to win historic second Tour
Fifteen years ago, Concorde crashed, and a dream died. Today, the desire to travel faster than the speed of sound is growing once again

A new beginning for supersonic flight?

Concorde's successors are in the works 15 years on from the Paris crash
I would never quit Labour, says Liz Kendall

I would never quit party, says Liz Kendall

Latest on the Labour leadership contest
Froome seals second Tour de France victory

Never mind Pinot, it’s bubbly for Froome

Second Tour de France victory all but sealed
Oh really? How the 'lowest form of wit' makes people brighter and more creative

The uses of sarcasm

'Lowest form of wit' actually makes people brighter and more creative
A magazine editor with no vanity, and lots of flair

No vanity, but lots of flair

A tribute to the magazine editor Ingrid Sischy
Foraging: How the British rediscovered their taste for chasing after wild food

In praise of foraging

How the British rediscovered their taste for wild food