Samit Patel's prediction is right as Glamorgan are well beaten

Notts left-arm spinner makes major contribution after ill-advised words in pre-match interview

lord's

The last Lord's cup final to be played over 40 overs ended with Nottinghamshire's name on the trophy after the short-priced favourites lived up to the bold predictions of one of their number by crushing underdogs Glamorgan.

Samit Patel, one of nine internationals in a Nottinghamshire side still threatened with relegation in the Championship, had riled the Welsh county and horrified his own team-mates with his comments in a pre-match interview, when he said Glamorgan "won't come anywhere close" to winning the final.

The forecast might have backfired. But in the event, it was an entirely accurate one as Nottinghamshire won by 87 runs, bowling Glamorgan out for 157 in 33 overs.

Patel, moreover, managed to back up his promise with a major contribution of his own, making up for a sloppy effort with the bat by delivering a devastating performance with his left-arm spin in which he took three wickets in nine balls to rip out Glamorgan's middle order. He comfortably outshone Graeme Swann, the England off-spinner, whose drafting into the side brought more benefits from his unbeaten 29 with the bat.

Patel's brilliant spell could not have come at a more critical moment, just as Glamorgan were beginning to suggest that Nottinghamshire's 244 for eight – a total that equalled the highest in a 40-over final – might be within their range.

He found turn to bowl Chris Cooke for 46 and Jim Allenby for 34 in consecutive overs, breaking a stand of 66 for the third wicket, then dismissed the experienced Murray Goodwin leg before wicket for six, reducing the Second Division side to 118 for five from 108 for two.

Thereafter, a Nottinghamshire win was almost inevitable. Patel was forgiven for his rash words. England fast bowler Stuart Broad took three wickets in his last over to justify also being parachuted in for the final – his first 40-over game for Nottinghamshire in this or any season – and there were three wickets too for Ajmal Shahzad, who would have stepped aside for Broad but for the back injury that sidelined Jake Ball.

Patel managed only 10 runs before a careless drive straight to mid-off. Alex Hales had paid for chancing his arm and Michael Lumb was undone by the introduction of spin just as he was beginning to get on top against the seamers. Simon Jones, in fine fettle in possibly his farewell appearance for Glamorgan, then found a moment of brilliance to have James Taylor caught behind.

Nottinghamshire owed their final total to a 99-run partnership between David Hussey and Chris Read, which had a slice of luck when Hussey was dropped on three by Gareth Rees at mid-off. Had that stuck, Nottinghamshire would have been 94 for five.

How Glamorgan regretted that. In the 14 overs that followed, the two senior Notts batsmen brought their experience to bear in finding the gaps in the field, their judicious nudges, backed up by good running, as vital as boundaries with not much pace off the bat. A misunderstanding with his captain cost Hussey his wicket.

Read's half-century, reached with a booming six off Graham Wagg, was only his second of a lean season, in all cricket. He perished soon afterwards, but the innings still had legs, thanks to Swann and Steven Mullaney, and the total facing Glamorgan was simply too challenging.

The result was the only blemish on a momentous day for two Glamorgan players at opposite ends of their careers. Jones, the most fragile of England's 2005 Ashes heroes, drew down the curtain on all bar the Twenty20 element of his 16 seasons in senior cricket, showing glimpses of the supreme skills that characterised his peak years in taking two for 36 from a full eight-over shift.

And 20-year-old Andrew Salter, an off-spinner of no little promise and ice-cool temperament, marked his first appearance at Lord's in only his ninth senior match for Glamorgan by taking a wicket with his second ball when Lumb provided him with an easy return catch.

Salter, who only last month took a wicket with his first ball in first-class cricket, claimed Patel as his second yesterday and would have had a third but for the costly dropping of Hussey.

Neither will play another match in this format, as will no one else –supposedly – after this season. The 2014 programme will see domestic one-day cricket in England played over 50 overs, in line with the international one-day game.

 

 

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