Stuart Broad claims eight as he hits the ground running

Derbyshire 256 & 229 Nottinghamshire 443 & 43-1 (Notts win by 9 wkts): Nottinghamshire's England paceman grabs four scalps to secure victory

Derby

You never know quite what to expect from Stuart Broad, whose most infuriating quality as a bowler is his tendency to blow hot and cold. But if the temperature at the County Ground yesterday was teeth-chatteringly at the latter extreme, the England fast bowler, figuratively speaking, was on fire.

Broad's burst of four wickets in 17 deliveries with the second new ball broke promoted Derbyshire's attempts to stave off a second defeat in three matches, setting up Nottinghamshire for a comfortable win that only a run of heavy showers threatened to deny them.

Just as importantly, it revealed Broad to be in fine fettle at a time of year when he can be a little rusty. He took eight wickets in the match, maintaining his impressive record for Nottinghamshire, and bowled with good pace and control, using the short ball sparingly but effectively and rarely missing the yorker length when he chose that option. There was no sign, either, of the heel injury that affected Broad in India during the first half of England's winter itinerary.

"Stuart took a bit of time to get going when he came back to us last season but he has not been too long without playing since the last Test in New Zealand and I think that's important for him," Nottinghamshire's director of cricket, Mick Newell, said.

"He has hit the ground running this time and he has another chance to bowl against Durham next week, after which you'd like to think he will go back to England in some nice form. He bowled with pace, too. I know that spell with the new ball today was against lower order batsmen but it was still quick, and it was well controlled and well directed."

Broad seldom gives Nottinghamshire less than full value, rarely though he plays for them. Yesterday's wickets took his tally to 65 in 12 Championship matches.

He ended Derbyshire's hopes of escaping this one with a draw. In deficit by 187 on first innings after James Taylor's measured century, they mounted respectable resistance at first on the final morning, recovering from five down for 143 overnight through the efforts of Dan Redfern and David Wainwright, who looked comfortable against the old ball, which was a much less potent weapon in the hands of Nottinghamshire's seamers, Broad included.

It was left to Samit Patel to probe away with his left-arm spin but though he managed to extract some slow turn it did not discomfort Redfern, who completed a solid half-century, or Wainwright, with whom he added 79.

But after a sharp shower forced the players off the field for 15 minutes Nottinghamshire took the new ball and Broad trapped Redfern in front with his first delivery, following up in his next over by having Wainwright caught behind off a brutish short ball he could only fend away in self-protection and, next ball, hitting Tom Poynton on the foot, plumb in front.

A 90-minute stoppage followed lunch but after Broad struck again with another toe cruncher, sending Tony Palladino limping back to the pavilion, Harry Gurney, the left-armer, cleaned up Jon Clare. It left Notts needing only 43 to win, which they polished off in short order with only the minor disappointment of losing opener Alex Hales.

Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Caption competition
Caption competition
Latest stories from i100
Daily Quiz
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

Career Services

Day In a Page

The difference between America and Israel? There isn’t one

The difference between America and Israel? There isn’t one

Netanyahu knows he can get away with anything in America, says Robert Fisk
Families clubbing together to build their own affordable accommodation

Do It Yourself approach to securing a new house

Community land trusts marking a new trend for taking the initiative away from developers
Head of WWF UK: We didn’t send Cameron to the Arctic to see green ideas freeze

David Nussbaum: We didn’t send Cameron to the Arctic to see green ideas freeze

The head of WWF UK remains sanguine despite the Government’s failure to live up to its pledges on the environment
Author Kazuo Ishiguro on being inspired by shoot-outs and samurai

Author Kazuo Ishiguro on being inspired by shoot-outs and samurai

Set in a mythologised 5th-century Britain, ‘The Buried Giant’ is a strange beast
With money, corruption and drugs, this monk fears Buddhism in Thailand is a ‘poisoned fruit’

Money, corruption and drugs

The monk who fears Buddhism in Thailand is a ‘poisoned fruit’
America's first slavery museum established at Django Unchained plantation - 150 years after slavery outlawed

150 years after it was outlawed...

... America's first slavery museum is established in Louisiana
Kelly Clarkson: How I snubbed Simon Cowell and become a Grammy-winning superstar

Kelly Clarkson: How I snubbed Simon Cowell and become a Grammy-winning superstar

The first 'American Idol' winner on how she manages to remain her own woman – Jane Austen fascination and all
Tony Oursler on exploring our uneasy relationship with technology with his new show

You won't believe your eyes

Tony Oursler's new show explores our uneasy relationship with technology. He's one of a growing number of artists with that preoccupation
Ian Herbert: Peter Moores must go. He should never have been brought back to fail again

Moores must go. He should never have been brought back to fail again

The England coach leaves players to find solutions - which makes you wonder where he adds value, says Ian Herbert
War with Isis: Fears that the looming battle for Mosul will unleash 'a million refugees'

The battle for Mosul will unleash 'a million refugees'

Aid agencies prepare for vast exodus following planned Iraqi offensive against the Isis-held city, reports Patrick Cockburn
Yvette Cooper: We can't lose the election. There's too much on the line

Yvette Cooper: We can't lose the election. There's too much on the line

The shadow Home Secretary on fighting radical Islam, protecting children, and why anyone in Labour who's thinking beyond May must 'sort themselves out'
A bad week for the Greens: Leader Natalie Bennett's 'car crash' radio interview is followed by Brighton council's failure to set a budget due to infighting

It's not easy being Green

After a bad week in which its leader had a public meltdown and its only city council couldn't agree on a budget vote, what next for the alternative party? It's over to Caroline Lucas to find out
Gorillas nearly missed: BBC producers didn't want to broadcast Sir David Attenborough's famed Rwandan encounter

Gorillas nearly missed

BBC producers didn't want to broadcast Sir David Attenborough's famed Rwandan encounter
Downton Abbey effect sees impoverished Italian nobles inspired to open their doors to paying guests for up to €650 a night

The Downton Abbey effect

Impoverished Italian nobles are opening their doors to paying guests, inspired by the TV drama
China's wild panda numbers have increased by 17% since 2003, new census reveals

China's wild panda numbers on the up

New census reveals 17% since 2003