Symonds injury makes him doubt for World Cup

'I'm optimistic for the future because I'm a good healer'

Andrew Symonds will miss the remainder of the Commonwealth Bank Series and is a real doubt for the World Cup after rupturing a biceps tendon in his right shoulder during Australia's match against England on Friday. The all-rounder sustained the injury while batting and was forced to retire hurt on 39. He is expected to have surgery to correct the problem today.

Symonds will miss the rest of the tournament and this month's Chappell-Hadlee series in New Zealand as he attempts to regain fitness for the World Cup starting next month in the West Indies. The Australian team doctor, Trefor James, would not speculate on how long he would be out of action. "He will undergo intensive physiotherapy following surgery. His return will depend on his progress," James said.

Australia's first World Cup match is just six weeks away, but Symonds is confident of making a full recovery. "I feel optimistic about the future because I know I'm a good healer," he said. "My wrist injury healed quicker than expected and is fine now. I'll do whatever it takes to get back as quickly as possible."

Symonds was a member of the Australian team who won the 2003 World Cup in South Africa, and the 31-year-old all-rounder will be one of the cornerstones of their campaign to win a third successive World Cup. He has scored more than 4,000 runs and taken 121 wickets in 161 matches, his versatility allowing the Australians the luxury of picking four specialist bowlers.

The powerful Queenslander smashed an unbeaten 39 off 35 balls but had to retire hurt once it became obvious the injury was serious. Australia lost by 92 runs, their first defeat in any form of cricket since October.

"I felt it go during the game but I didn't realise how bad it was," he said. "I batted on but the pain was considerable and I was advised by the team physio, Alex Kountouris, to come off."

England's long-term planning for the World Cup revolved around a Durham pace bowler's firepower - but just a month before the plane leaves for the Caribbean his identity has changed.

Liam Plunkett has revelled in new-ball duties for England over the past week to fill the hole left by his county colleague Steve Harmison's premature retirement from one-day internationals. Having kicked his heels in the nets for all but the fag end of the Ashes tour, the 21-year-old has seized his chance with six wickets in two matches.

His first ball in Sydney saw him send back Adam Gilchrist with a beautiful inswinging yorker and finish with career-best figures of three for 24.

"To get him first ball meant the pressure was bang on from then," said Plunkett.

With World Cup selection just 10 days away it was a timely opportunity to showcase his ability to unleash 90mph, wicket-taking deliveries.

"Obviously you want to be as quick as you can but also in control, so game by game I feel like I'm getting better and more consistent," said Plunkett. "Hopefully the pace will stay along with consistency.

"I just want to read the situation: if the pitch is quick I want to run in and hit it, but yesterday there was a little bit in it so I tried to slow down a little bit and try to hit an area.

"I am never going to be the quickest in the team but I feel I can hit the pitch hard and that is what I do best. I've had two months getting back into cricket, been in the gym quite a lot and got lot stronger."

PROMOTED VIDEO
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Caption competition
Caption competition
Latest stories from i100
Daily Quiz
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

Career Services

Day In a Page

As in 1942, Germany must show restraint over Greece

As in 1942, Germany must show restraint over Greece

Mussolini tried to warn his ally of the danger of bringing the country to its knees. So should we, says Patrick Cockburn
Britain's widening poverty gap should be causing outrage at the start of the election campaign

The short stroll that should be our walk of shame

Courting the global elite has failed to benefit Britain, as the vast disparity in wealth on display in the capital shows
Homeless Veterans appeal: The rise of the working poor: when having a job cannot prevent poverty

Homeless Veterans appeal

The rise of the working poor: when having a job cannot prevent poverty
Prince Charles the saviour of the nation? A new book highlights concerns about how political he will be when he eventually becomes king

Prince Charles the saviour of the nation?

A new book highlights concerns about how political he will be when he eventually becomes king
How books can defeat Isis: Patrick Cockburn was able to update his agenda-setting 'The Rise of Islamic State' while under attack in Baghdad

How books can defeat Isis

Patrick Cockburn was able to update his agenda-setting 'The Rise of Islamic State' while under attack in Baghdad
Judith Hackitt: The myths of elf 'n' safety

Judith Hackitt: The myths of elf 'n' safety

She may be in charge of minimising our risks of injury, but the chair of the Health and Safety Executive still wants children to be able to hurt themselves
The open loathing between Barack Obama and Benjamin Netanyahu just got worse

The open loathing between Obama and Netanyahu just got worse

The Israeli PM's relationship with the Obama has always been chilly, but going over the President's head on Iran will do him no favours, says Rupert Cornwell
French chefs get 'le huff' as nation slips down global cuisine rankings

French chefs get 'le huff' as nation slips down global cuisine rankings

Fury at British best restaurants survey sees French magazine produce a rival list
Star choreographer Matthew Bourne gives young carers a chance to perform at Sadler's Wells

Young carers to make dance debut

What happened when superstar choreographer Matthew Bourne encouraged 27 teenage carers to think about themselves for once?
Design Council's 70th anniversary: Four of the most intriguing prototypes from Ones to Watch

Design Council's 70th anniversary

Four of the most intriguing prototypes from Ones to Watch
Dame Harriet Walter: The actress on learning what it is to age, plastic surgery, and her unease at being honoured by the establishment

Dame Harriet Walter interview

The actress on learning what it is to age, plastic surgery, and her unease at being honoured by the establishment
Art should not be a slave to the ideas driving it

Art should not be a slave to the ideas driving it

Critics of Tom Stoppard's new play seem to agree that cerebral can never trump character, says DJ Taylor
Bill Granger recipes: Our chef's winter salads will make you feel energised through February

Bill Granger's winter salads

Salads aren't just a bit on the side, says our chef - their crunch, colour and natural goodness are perfect for a midwinter pick-me-up
England vs Wales: Cool head George Ford ready to put out dragon fire

George Ford: Cool head ready to put out dragon fire

No 10’s calmness under pressure will be key for England in Cardiff
Michael Calvin: Time for Old Firm to put aside bigotry and forge new links

Michael Calvin's Last Word

Time for Old Firm to put aside bigotry and forge new links