Tait says 'I'm not bothered about playing in Ashes'

Shaun Tait has revealed that he has had no contact from Australia's captain Ricky Ponting regarding his availability to play in the Ashes this winter.

The 100mph paceman was reported to be top of Ponting's wish list to be involved against England after his terrorising performances in the recent one-day clashes which saw him receive the man-of-the-match award at Lord's eight days ago.

Ponting was forthright in his feelings about having Tait back in his side and said after the win in that final one-day international that he had not given up hope of persuading Tait to make a return to Test level after a three-year absence.

However, Tait, who has struggled to stay injury-free, insists he has not received a telephone call and insists he is not bothered over the snub, nor facing Andrew Strauss' men. The 27-year-old said: "Ricky has never asked me to come back and play at Test level. It's been all blown up by the media but that is all it has been.

"I'm not really bothered either way about the Ashes – I'm not concerned. It's a weird thing how it came up because I haven't even thought about playing Test cricket.

"I got through three one-day games and then the next minute I'm being talked about as a Test cricketer once again. It's a long way off for me. I believe you have to play a certain amount of four-day games for your state before you can even begin being asked to play in a Test match."

Tait, whose lightning delivery to Craig Kieswetter at Lord's was clocked at 100.1mph, has not played a four-day match for nearly two years. But his coach at Glamorgan, Matthew Maynard, believes his likely omission will be a big boost for England when they make the trip Down Under.

The former England player and assistant coach under Duncan Fletcher said: "Australia have a strong bowling unit but someone of Shaun's pace is an asset to any side. He has shown that but to keep that pace up does take a lot out of the body to bowl at 100mph, especially in a Test match.

"He knows his body better than anyone and I'm sure if he knew he could play in the longer form of the game, he would love to play for Australia in Test match cricket. But it is a bonus for England that he probably won't be playing against them."

As the countdown for the eagerly anticipated series starting in November hots up, Australia return to Test action against Pakistan at Lord's on Tuesday. But Tait believes the tourists have the strength in depth in their attack to cope.

"Australia have plenty of great bowlers and never have a problem with their fast-bowling depth," said Tait. "Doug Bollinger has a great record, Mitchell Johnson is the current World Cricketer of the Year and quick on his day, and then there's Peter Siddle, Ben Hilfenhaus and Ryan Harris.

"They should be fine and I think they should be clear favourites to win the Ashes back in Australia. Recent results against England have hurt us but if we play well as a team, we should beat any team in the world. That's the way I see it."

Tait has been dubbed "Wild Thing" on the field but the Adelaide Express admits it is a case of role reversal off the field. "The nickname is a fun thing which has been brought up over the last couple of years," he said. "It is good banter in the dressing room for the lads and it's a laugh. But I'm pretty laid-back and reasonably slow-paced. In fact, I'm quite the opposite of the nickname. My car is quick but I'm not a rev-head. I like to take things easy and chill."

Tait sat out Glamorgan's Twenty20 victory over Surrey on Friday night but is expected to be fit for the math against Kent at Canterbury today after a shin-splint problem.

Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Caption competition
Caption competition
Latest stories from i100
Daily Quiz
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
SPONSORED FEATURES
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

Career Services

Day In a Page

Migrant crisis: UN official Philippe Douste-Blazy reveals the harrowing sights he encountered among refugees arriving on Lampedusa

‘Can we really just turn away?’

Dead bodies, men drowning, women miscarrying – a senior UN figure on the horrors he has witnessed among migrants arriving on Lampedusa, and urges politicians not to underestimate our caring nature
Nine of Syria and Iraq's 10 world heritage sites are in danger as Isis ravages centuries of history

Nine of Syria and Iraq's 10 world heritage sites are in danger...

... and not just because of Isis vandalism
Girl on a Plane: An exclusive extract of the novelisation inspired by the 1970 Palestinian fighters hijack

Girl on a Plane

An exclusive extract of the novelisation inspired by the 1970 Palestinian fighters hijack
Why Frederick Forsyth's spying days could spell disaster for today's journalists

Why Frederick Forsyth's spying days could spell disaster for today's journalists

The author of 'The Day of the Jackal' has revealed he spied for MI6 while a foreign correspondent
Markus Persson: If being that rich is so bad, why not just give it all away?

That's a bit rich

The billionaire inventor of computer game Minecraft says he is bored, lonely and isolated by his vast wealth. If it’s that bad, says Simon Kelner, why not just give it all away?
Euro 2016: Chris Coleman on course to end half a century of hurt for Wales

Coleman on course to end half a century of hurt for Wales

Wales last qualified for major tournament in 1958 but after several near misses the current crop can book place at Euro 2016 and end all the indifference
Rugby World Cup 2015: The tournament's forgotten XV

Forgotten XV of the rugby World Cup

Now the squads are out, Chris Hewett picks a side of stars who missed the cut
A groundbreaking study of 'Britain's Atlantis' long buried at the bottom of the North Sea could revolutionise how we see our prehistoric past

Britain's Atlantis

Scientific study beneath North Sea could revolutionise how we see the past
The Queen has 'done and said nothing that anybody will remember,' says Starkey

The Queen has 'done and said nothing that anybody will remember'

David Starkey's assessment
Oliver Sacks said his life has been 'an enormous privilege and adventure'

'An enormous privilege and adventure'

Oliver Sacks writing about his life
'Gibraltar is British, and it is going to stay British forever'

'Gibraltar is British, and it is going to stay British forever'

The Rock's Chief Minister hits back at Spanish government's 'lies'
Britain is still addicted to 'dirty coal'

Britain still addicted to 'dirty' coal

Biggest energy suppliers are more dependent on fossil fuel than a decade ago
Orthorexia nervosa: How becoming obsessed with healthy eating can lead to malnutrition

Orthorexia nervosa

How becoming obsessed with healthy eating can lead to malnutrition
Lady Chatterley is not obscene, says TV director

Lady Chatterley’s Lover

Director Jed Mercurio on why DH Lawrence's novel 'is not an obscene story'
Farmers in tropical forests are training ants to kill off bigger pests

Set a pest to catch a pest

Farmers in tropical forests are training ants to kill off bigger pests