Taylor outpaces the Aussies

Australia 163-5 England 165-2

They have already paraded the 50-over cup around Lord's this month. Now England's women are favourites to win the World Twenty20 trophy in front of a big crowd at the home of cricket tomorrow after putting together a perfect run-chase against old rivals Australia yesterday.

Charlotte Edwards and her team were invited to show off their silverware halfway through the opening men's match between England and the Netherlands. This time, though, they will be on centre stage for three hours, having earned the right to meet New Zealand in the final by surging past a daunting Aussie total of 163 for 5 with eight wickets and three balls to spare. Wisden Cricketer of the Year Claire Taylor and Beth Morgan took just 79 deliveries to break green and gold hearts with an unbroken stand of 122.

Many people may like to see this result as a good omen going into a summer of Ashes battles. But all that mattered at The Oval yesterday was the outcome as England ended a run of three consecutive defeats by Australia – and, for good measure, produced a level of performance, at least with the bat, that was an excellent advertisement for women's cricket.

"I'm really chuffed," said Edwards, who helped to her team's reply off to a decent start before departing and leaving the way clear for Taylor and Morgan. "The pressure was on us but we've produced the goods and now we are looking forward to Lord's. And hopefully we can have another trophy to show for our efforts."

Despite winning the 50-over World Cup in Sydney three months ago, England lost to Australia both before and during that event. Then they were beaten again by the old enemy in a warm-up game at Taunton before this competition started. Yet, despite those results and even though they needed to equal the highest score of the tournament to make it to the final, the hosts never looked intimidated.

"A lot of people had spoken about our fragile middle order but I hope we have proved a few people wrong," said Edwards. "This was probably as well as we've batted for a long time. The bowling performance was far from perfect, but we'll put that right. And although I said six months ago that the 50-over format was the big prize, if we win at Lord's the profile [of women's cricket] could go from strength to strength.

"I know it's a 10.30am start but I hope people get out of bed and come to watch us before the men's final."

They certainly should. No two batters could have paced the pursuit of a testing target more expertly then Taylor – who plays violin in an orchestra when she's not making big runs – and Morgan, niece of former England spinner Eddie Hemmings. Classical drives were mixed with paddle sweeps, and Australia could not keep them at bay.

New Zealand were the fall girls when England won in Sydney – by four wickets – three months ago. A repeat performance tomorrow would see Edwards and Co on top of the world once again.

Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Arts and Entertainment
Chris Martin of Coldplay performs live for fans at Enmore Theatre on June 19, 2014 in Sydney, Australia. (Photo by Mark Metcalfe/Getty Images)
music
Sport
Dave Mackay lifts the FA Cup in 1967 having skippered Spurs to victory
football
Life and Style
Marie had fake ID, in the name of Johanna Koch, after she evaded capture by the Nazis in wartime Berlin
historyOne woman's secret life as a Jew in wartime Berlin
News
Jihadi John
newsMonikers like 'Jihadi John' make the grim sound glamorous
Arts and Entertainment
As depicted in Disney's Robin Hood, King John was cowardly, cruel, avaricious and incompetent
film
Life and Style
Travis Kalanick, the co-founder of Uber, is now worth $5.3bn
tech
Caption competition
Caption competition
Latest stories from i100
Daily Quiz
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

Career Services

Day In a Page

Syrian conflict is the world's first 'climate change war', say scientists, but it won't be the last one

Climate change key in Syrian conflict

And it will trigger more war in future
How I outwitted the Gestapo

How I outwitted the Gestapo

My life as a Jew in wartime Berlin
The nation's favourite animal revealed

The nation's favourite animal revealed

Women like cuddly creatures whilst men like creepy-crawlies
Is this the way to get young people to vote?

Getting young people to vote

From #VOTESELFISH to Bite the Ballot
Poldark star Heida Reed: 'I don't think a single bodice gets ripped'

Poldark star Heida Reed

'I don't think a single bodice gets ripped'
The difference between America and Israel? There isn’t one

The difference between America and Israel? There isn’t one

Netanyahu knows he can get away with anything in America, says Robert Fisk
Families clubbing together to build their own affordable accommodation

Do It Yourself approach to securing a new house

Community land trusts marking a new trend for taking the initiative away from developers
Head of WWF UK: We didn’t send Cameron to the Arctic to see green ideas freeze

David Nussbaum: We didn’t send Cameron to the Arctic to see green ideas freeze

The head of WWF UK remains sanguine despite the Government’s failure to live up to its pledges on the environment
Author Kazuo Ishiguro on being inspired by shoot-outs and samurai

Author Kazuo Ishiguro on being inspired by shoot-outs and samurai

Set in a mythologised 5th-century Britain, ‘The Buried Giant’ is a strange beast
With money, corruption and drugs, this monk fears Buddhism in Thailand is a ‘poisoned fruit’

Money, corruption and drugs

The monk who fears Buddhism in Thailand is a ‘poisoned fruit’
America's first slavery museum established at Django Unchained plantation - 150 years after slavery outlawed

150 years after it was outlawed...

... America's first slavery museum is established in Louisiana
Kelly Clarkson: How I snubbed Simon Cowell and become a Grammy-winning superstar

Kelly Clarkson: How I snubbed Simon Cowell and become a Grammy-winning superstar

The first 'American Idol' winner on how she manages to remain her own woman – Jane Austen fascination and all
Tony Oursler on exploring our uneasy relationship with technology with his new show

You won't believe your eyes

Tony Oursler's new show explores our uneasy relationship with technology. He's one of a growing number of artists with that preoccupation
Ian Herbert: Peter Moores must go. He should never have been brought back to fail again

Moores must go. He should never have been brought back to fail again

The England coach leaves players to find solutions - which makes you wonder where he adds value, says Ian Herbert
War with Isis: Fears that the looming battle for Mosul will unleash 'a million refugees'

The battle for Mosul will unleash 'a million refugees'

Aid agencies prepare for vast exodus following planned Iraqi offensive against the Isis-held city, reports Patrick Cockburn