Tea Report: Sussex 193-2 (64 overs) v Surrey

Tea on the second day of four (Surrey won toss)

Surrey’s failure to contain and remove more Sussex batsmen could well thwart their victory ambitions now that this match has been reduced by the weather to a three-day game.

Sussex opener Carl Hopkinson, who made his First Class debut six years ago, but did not really establish himself in the side until 2006, moved steadily towards his maiden century, by the interval he had surpassed his previous highest score of 83 and was within touching distance of three figures.

Apart from getting his fifty – the 12th of his career to date – with a streaky inside edge for four, off the 137th ball of his innings bowled by Jimmy Ormond, the 26-year-old did not give the toiling Surrey attack a glimpse of a weakness.

His four hours at the crease were a study in concentration. He and Murray Goodwin had added 76 for the third wicket as Surrey went through half a dozen bowlers in an effort to part the pair.

Earlier Hopkinson had lost opening partner Chris Nash – another in the Sussex squad who has yet to score a first class hundred – with the stand just 13 runs away from the century mark, Nash playing on to be bowled by West Indies paceman Pedro Collins. Michael Yardy fell early in the afternoon session, caught at slip attempting to sweep Pakistani off-spinner Saqlain Mushtaq.

The news was not good for Sussex’s own Mushtaq. Leg spinner Mushtaq Ahmed underwent a knee operation yesterday to repair a torn cartilage and will be out for three weeks, although he is likely to miss only one other First Class match, the one against Somerset at Taunton in a fortnight.

Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Caption competition
Caption competition
Latest stories from i100
Daily Quiz
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
SPONSORED FEATURES
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

Career Services

Day In a Page

Solved after 200 years: the mysterious deaths of 3,000 soldiers from Napoleon's army

Solved after 200 years

The mysterious deaths of 3,000 soldiers from Napoleon's army
Every regional power has betrayed the Kurds so Turkish bombing is no surprise

Robert Fisk on the Turkey conflict

Every regional power has betrayed the Kurds so Turkish bombing is no surprise
Investigation into wreck of unidentified submarine found off the coast of Sweden

Sunken sub

Investigation underway into wreck of an unidentified submarine found off the coast of Sweden
Instagram and Facebook have 'totally changed' the way people buy clothes

Age of the selfie

Instagram and Facebook have 'totally changed' the way people buy clothes
Not so square: How BBC's Bloomsbury saga is sexing up the period drama

Not so square

How Virginia Woolf saga is sexing up the BBC period drama
Rio Olympics 2016: The seven teenagers still carrying a torch for our Games hopes

Still carrying the torch

The seven teenagers given our Olympic hopes
The West likes to think that 'civilisation' will defeat Isis, but history suggests otherwise

The West likes to think that 'civilisation' will defeat Isis...

...but history suggests otherwise
The bald truth: How one author's thinning hair made him a Wayne Rooney sympathiser

The bald truth

How thinning hair made me a Wayne Rooney sympathiser
Froome wins second Tour de France after triumphant ride into Paris with Team Sky

Tour de France 2015

Froome rides into Paris to win historic second Tour
Fifteen years ago, Concorde crashed, and a dream died. Today, the desire to travel faster than the speed of sound is growing once again

A new beginning for supersonic flight?

Concorde's successors are in the works 15 years on from the Paris crash
I would never quit Labour, says Liz Kendall

I would never quit party, says Liz Kendall

Latest on the Labour leadership contest
Froome seals second Tour de France victory

Never mind Pinot, it’s bubbly for Froome

Second Tour de France victory all but sealed
Oh really? How the 'lowest form of wit' makes people brighter and more creative

The uses of sarcasm

'Lowest form of wit' actually makes people brighter and more creative
A magazine editor with no vanity, and lots of flair

No vanity, but lots of flair

A tribute to the magazine editor Ingrid Sischy
Foraging: How the British rediscovered their taste for chasing after wild food

In praise of foraging

How the British rediscovered their taste for wild food