'Team director' axed as England seek one coach

The successful candidate will be in charge across all three formats of the game, ending the experiment of split coaches

The England and Wales Cricket Board will interview for a new head coach in early April, after an official job specification was released for the role.

While the likely candidates to replace Andy Flower have been busy ruling themselves in or out of the race for several weeks, the formal recruitment process has now started. A detailed advert has been placed for the post, which will no longer carry the "team director" title held by Flower.

As expected the successful candidate will be in charge across all three formats of the game, ending the experiment of split coaches that led to Ashley Giles being recruited to lead the limited-overs sides while Flower concentrated on the Test squad.

Giles, who is in charge of England on their forthcoming one-day tour of West Indies as well as the forthcoming World Twenty20 in Bangladesh, remains the strong favourite for the top job and fits comfortably within the parameters set by the ECB. The wording does not require international experience as a player, though Giles' status as an Ashes-winning spinner will do him no harm at all.

The notice read: "Whilst international coaching and/or international playing experience is highly desirable, candidates who have coached at first-class level will also be considered for this position.

"Candidates must be able to point to a track record of success at first-class and/or international level achieved over an extended period of time."

The wording opens the door to applications from the likes of Nottinghamshire's Mick Newell. Domestic candidates such as Newell, Lancashire's Peter Moores and Giles, who won the 2012 County Championship while in charge of Warwickshire, would also fit the ECB bill for an individual who can "develop effective working relationships with all of the counties, drawing on the expertise and experience of coaches from around the country."

Meanwhile, South Africa were left to rue the loss of cheap wickets after battling to 214 for 5 on the opening day of the second Test against Australia in Port Elizabeth.

Bad light brought a premature end to the day with A B de Villiers on 51 and J P Duminy on two. De Villiers passed 7,000 Test runs and became the first player to score half-centuries in 12 Tests in a row.

It might well have been a better day for the hosts after they won the toss and elected to bat, but Dean Elgar (83) and debutant Quinton de Kock (seven) gave their wickets away with rash shots.

The pitch did not have the devil of the previous Test in Pretoria and rendered Mitchell Johnson less effective. The South Africans played him with relative comfort once the shine had been taken off the new ball.

PA

Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Caption competition
Caption competition
  • Get to the point
Latest stories from i100
Daily Quiz
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

Career Services

Day In a Page

No postcode? No vote

Floating voters

How living on a houseboat meant I didn't officially 'exist'
Louis Theroux's affable Englishman routine begins to wear thin

By Reason of Insanity

Louis Theroux's affable Englishman routine begins to wear thin
Power dressing is back – but no shoulderpads!

Power dressing is back

But banish all thoughts of Eighties shoulderpads
Spanish stone-age cave paintings 'under threat' after being re-opened to the public

Spanish stone-age cave paintings in Altamira 'under threat'

Caves were re-opened to the public
'I was the bookies’ favourite to be first to leave the Cabinet'

Vince Cable interview

'I was the bookies’ favourite to be first to leave the Cabinet'
Election 2015: How many of the Government's coalition agreement promises have been kept?

Promises, promises

But how many coalition agreement pledges have been kept?
The Gaza fisherman who built his own reef - and was shot dead there by an Israeli gunboat

The death of a Gaza fisherman

He built his own reef, and was fatally shot there by an Israeli gunboat
Saudi Arabia's airstrikes in Yemen are fuelling the Gulf's fire

Saudi airstrikes are fuelling the Gulf's fire

Arab intervention in Yemen risks entrenching Sunni-Shia divide and handing a victory to Isis, says Patrick Cockburn
Zayn Malik's departure from One Direction shows the perils of fame in the age of social media

The only direction Zayn could go

We wince at the anguish of One Direction's fans, but Malik's departure shows the perils of fame in the age of social media
Young Magician of the Year 2015: Meet the schoolgirl from Newcastle who has her heart set on being the competition's first female winner

Spells like teen spirit

A 16-year-old from Newcastle has set her heart on being the first female to win Young Magician of the Year. Jonathan Owen meets her
Jonathan Anderson: If fashion is a cycle, this young man knows just how to ride it

If fashion is a cycle, this young man knows just how to ride it

British designer Jonathan Anderson is putting his stamp on venerable house Loewe
Number plates scheme could provide a licence to offend in the land of the free

Licence to offend in the land of the free

Cash-strapped states have hit on a way of making money out of drivers that may be in collision with the First Amendment, says Rupert Cornwell
From farm to fork: Meet the Cornish fishermen, vegetable-growers and butchers causing a stir in London's top restaurants

From farm to fork in Cornwall

One man is bringing together Cornwall's most accomplished growers, fishermen and butchers with London's best chefs to put the finest, freshest produce on the plates of some of the country’s best restaurants
Robert Parker interview: The world's top wine critic on tasting 10,000 bottles a year, absurd drinking notes and New World wannabes

Robert Parker interview

The world's top wine critic on tasting 10,000 bottles a year, absurd drinking notes and New World wannabes
Don't believe the stereotype - or should you?

Don't believe the stereotype - or should you?

We exaggerate regional traits and turn them into jokes - and those on the receiving end are in on it too, says DJ Taylor