The Ashes 2013-14: England team-mates defend Alastair Cook after Shane Warne labels captain 'boring' and 'negative'

The former Australian bowler thinks England could lose the Ashes

Alastair Cook's England team-mates have spoken up for their captain after Shane Warne's latest critique of his “boring” and “negative” tactics.

Warne, revisiting a theme he favoured during Australia's 3-0 Ashes defeat in England last summer, has suggested the tourists may well be about to lose the urn unless Cook changes his ways.

But Jonathan Trott cited England's success on home soil under Cook as counter-evidence to the opinion of Australia's record-breaking wicket-taker.

"To win 3-0, I don't think the tactics were that bad," Trott told Sky Sports News.

The number three batsman also believes that appearances can be deceptive, and many outside the England team are mistaken about Cook's methods and capabilities as a leader.

He said: "I know there are people who think he is inept at it, but everyone in the changing room knows he's well ahead of most people in that department."

Pace linchpin James Anderson and vice-captain Matt Prior also defended Cook.

"He leads by example, and just drags everyone with him," said Anderson.

Prior added: "There is always going to be scrutiny and the captain as a leader is always going to come under fire.

"But Cooky's a very strong person mentally.

"He takes it all in his stride, and ultimately his record speaks for itself. He's doing pretty well."

Warne had blasted Cook ahead of this winter's Ashes series and questioned his style of captaincy.

The former Australia leg-spin bowler, who is now at home in the commentary box, laid into the England captain during the Durham Test, just before Stuart Broad kick-started a collapse which gave the home side outright series victory for a third successive time.

Revisiting one of his favourite subjects before the first Test at The Gabba, Warne told national newspapers: "He can be negative, boring, not very imaginative - and still win and be happy.

"But I'll tell you my opinion - I think Alastair Cook has to be more imaginative.

"I think if Australia play well, and he continues to captain the way he does, England will lose the series.

"He lets the game drift."

Warne also singled out 22-year-old England opening batsman Joe Root for criticism.

Warne, a cornerstone of Australia's Ashes dominance in the 1990s and 2000s, thinks Root needs to be given a break down the order at number six.

The former leg-spinner's preference to replace the Yorkshireman alongside Cook is his own former Hampshire team-mate Michael Carberry.

Root's first series as an opener was only a qualified success, despite his second-innings 180 in England's landslide Lord's Test victory over Australia.

"If I was choosing the side I'd open the batting with Carberry and put Root down to number six," said Warne.

"Root played really well at Lord's, and Australia had a bit of a shocker there.

"But I don't think he's an opener. I don't think his technique is tight enough. He will be found out opening in Australia."

Warne senses Australia have the pace to severely undermine Root on their own bouncier pitches.

"I think you could be crucifying him if you're facing Ryan Harris or Mitchell Johnson on fast, bouncy pitches," he said.

"He's going to 'nick off' a lot and I think - as we saw before, aside from Lord's - Australia really did have his number."

PA

News
Bill Gates, founder of Microsoft and co-chair of the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation
businessUber, Snapchat and Facebook founders among those on the 2015 Forbes Billionaire List
News
news... and what your reaction to the creatures above says about you
News
Jihadi John
newsMonikers like 'Jihadi John' make the grim sound glamorous
News
music
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Caption competition
Caption competition
Latest stories from i100
Daily Quiz
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

Career Services

Day In a Page

The difference between America and Israel? There isn’t one

The difference between America and Israel? There isn’t one

Netanyahu knows he can get away with anything in America, says Robert Fisk
Families clubbing together to build their own affordable accommodation

Do It Yourself approach to securing a new house

Community land trusts marking a new trend for taking the initiative away from developers
Head of WWF UK: We didn’t send Cameron to the Arctic to see green ideas freeze

David Nussbaum: We didn’t send Cameron to the Arctic to see green ideas freeze

The head of WWF UK remains sanguine despite the Government’s failure to live up to its pledges on the environment
Author Kazuo Ishiguro on being inspired by shoot-outs and samurai

Author Kazuo Ishiguro on being inspired by shoot-outs and samurai

Set in a mythologised 5th-century Britain, ‘The Buried Giant’ is a strange beast
With money, corruption and drugs, this monk fears Buddhism in Thailand is a ‘poisoned fruit’

Money, corruption and drugs

The monk who fears Buddhism in Thailand is a ‘poisoned fruit’
America's first slavery museum established at Django Unchained plantation - 150 years after slavery outlawed

150 years after it was outlawed...

... America's first slavery museum is established in Louisiana
Kelly Clarkson: How I snubbed Simon Cowell and become a Grammy-winning superstar

Kelly Clarkson: How I snubbed Simon Cowell and become a Grammy-winning superstar

The first 'American Idol' winner on how she manages to remain her own woman – Jane Austen fascination and all
Tony Oursler on exploring our uneasy relationship with technology with his new show

You won't believe your eyes

Tony Oursler's new show explores our uneasy relationship with technology. He's one of a growing number of artists with that preoccupation
Ian Herbert: Peter Moores must go. He should never have been brought back to fail again

Moores must go. He should never have been brought back to fail again

The England coach leaves players to find solutions - which makes you wonder where he adds value, says Ian Herbert
War with Isis: Fears that the looming battle for Mosul will unleash 'a million refugees'

The battle for Mosul will unleash 'a million refugees'

Aid agencies prepare for vast exodus following planned Iraqi offensive against the Isis-held city, reports Patrick Cockburn
Yvette Cooper: We can't lose the election. There's too much on the line

Yvette Cooper: We can't lose the election. There's too much on the line

The shadow Home Secretary on fighting radical Islam, protecting children, and why anyone in Labour who's thinking beyond May must 'sort themselves out'
A bad week for the Greens: Leader Natalie Bennett's 'car crash' radio interview is followed by Brighton council's failure to set a budget due to infighting

It's not easy being Green

After a bad week in which its leader had a public meltdown and its only city council couldn't agree on a budget vote, what next for the alternative party? It's over to Caroline Lucas to find out
Gorillas nearly missed: BBC producers didn't want to broadcast Sir David Attenborough's famed Rwandan encounter

Gorillas nearly missed

BBC producers didn't want to broadcast Sir David Attenborough's famed Rwandan encounter
Downton Abbey effect sees impoverished Italian nobles inspired to open their doors to paying guests for up to €650 a night

The Downton Abbey effect

Impoverished Italian nobles are opening their doors to paying guests, inspired by the TV drama
China's wild panda numbers have increased by 17% since 2003, new census reveals

China's wild panda numbers on the up

New census reveals 17% since 2003