Trott chips in as England graft back into match

England 192 Pakistan 288-7: With Pakistan batting fourth, anything could happen if the lead is kept down to near 100

Dubai Cricket Stadium

When England came to play in the desert they can hardly have expected to find themselves all at sea. They spent most of the second day of the first Test here yesterday trying to avert that peculiar fate.

It was a long and deliberate exercise in damage limitation, a position dictated by their reckless disregard for probity the previous day. There was no surprise that they finished the day behind Pakistan but that the deficit was only 96 could be a considered a triumph.

Through bowling that was largely accurate and designed to discourage ambition, or perhaps to tempt it, they tried to wear down Pakistan. The exercise was mutual. Pakistan's dramatic recent improvement has been based on playing defensively, trying to bore the opposition to defeat.

England took two wickets in the first session, two in the second and three in the third, with two in the final two overs that may ultimately bear the most fruit. The strategy was that if they could keep the arrears to not much more than 100 they were still in the game and with Pakistan, on 288 for 7, forced to bat fourth anything could happen.

The wickets were distributed between Stuart Broad, Graeme Swann, Jimmy Anderson and most unexpectedly Jonathan Trott. It was hard and unremitting work and so far England have failed to take wickets with the first new ball and managed only one with the second. They have to improve on that return, otherwise the dog days will pile up. Their bowling generally, however, was exemplary.

Mohammad Hafeez became the top scorer in the match so far, stealthily reaching 88 before he was lbw trying to sweep Swann. Before the close Pakistan's obdurate captain, Misbah-ul-Haq, who seemed to have bedded down for the night and looked fully prepared to outstay his welcome, went the same way for 52, England's review of a tight call having succeeded.

It was a vital breach. Five years ago, Misbah came excruciatingly close to winning the first World Twenty20 for Pakistan, the last man out trying to improvise a dinky paddle shot which was caught at fine leg. He has utterly expunged that sort of nonsense from his Test cricket lexicon. He might, if a rush of blood seizes him, play a drive through extra cover or a whip through the on side, but mostly he blocks and accumulates. He knows what works on these pitches.

Perhaps in their wildest dreams England might have supposed that Swann could reprise the achievements of his fellow off spinner, Saeed Ajmal, and run through Pakistan. It never looked remotely possible. Indeed, worryingly for England, there were passages when Swann was combatted with disturbing ease, picked off by the batsmen at just over three runs an over as though they were leafing half-heartedly through the morning paper.

But England knew that they would be kept in the field for 120 overs or so during this series and that wickets would not tumble at their command as they have tended to do lately. The fault was in not having scored sufficient runs.

It was Broad, as he frequently did last summer when he got his mojo back, who made the initial incisions in the opposition to put England into the match for the first time. Pakistan's opening pair, Hafeez and Taufeeq Umar, have become an established partnership in the last year and they became the first Pakistani opening pair to record five first-wicket stands of above 100.

Apart from a short burst in the morning, they never went at more than three an over. They didn't need to. It was a surprise when Broad, coming on for his second spell, had Hafeez dropped from a miscued pull by Chris Tremlett running to his right from mid-on.

There had been no false shots until then, but for England it seemed important. Hafeez had already been reprieved when Ian Bell missed the stumps from square leg as the batsman, sent back after calling for a single, was well short of his ground. It was a tough chance, as was Tremlett's, but precisely the sort that England have to take on this tour.

It was a bigger surprise when, to Broad's next ball, Taufeeq played forward and was beaten and bowled by one that did just enough. Thus spurred, Broad bowled the best spell by a seamer in the match and persuaded Azhar Ali, another Pakistani batsman regularly defying the notion of them being wristy strokemakers whose mission in life is to entertain, to cavort with a ball outside off.

After Hafeez fell to Swann, Younis Khan was ensnared by an off-cutter in Trott's first fill-in over. Had the term not already been invented, dibbly-dobbly would have had to be minted for Trott. He has no pace to speak of, but he bowls accurately enough to make players think that they would not want to get out to him. A little off-cutter did for an astonished Younis.

It was Trott's third Test wicket and with due respect to Jahurul Islam and Tharanga Paranavitana this was by far his most prestigious. Of those to have scored 1,000 Test runs for Pakistan, Younis has the highest Test average, marginally ahead now of Javed Miandad on 52.8. It is some scalp to have and Trott understandably scythed the air.

Asad Shafiq fell in the first over with the second new ball, Anderson's opening wicket of the series, with wicketkeeper Matt Prior swooping low to his right to scoop a one-handed catch. England's cup virtually floweth over when Swann removed Misbah and then Anderson snaked one through Abdur Rehman's defences. Not all at sea, but afloat once more.

Timeline: How the second day unfolded

7.17am (UK time) Pakistan 102-0: Mohammad Hafeez cuts Graeme Swann for four to bring up the century opening stand with Taufeeq Umar.

7.31am Taufeeq Umar out, 58 (Pak 114-1): Stuart Broad ends an increasingly imposing opening stand, hitting the top of Taufeeq's off stump.

7.47am Azhar Ali, 1 (128-2): Broad moves one away, it catches the thinnest-possible outside edge and is caught by Matt Prior.

9.41am Mohammad Hafeez, 88 (176-3): Swann ends Hafeez's excellent innings, as the batsman misses a straight ball and is leg before wicket.

10.27am Younis Khan, 37 (202-4) The introduction of Jonathan Trott's medium pace works perfectly: Khan is trapped in front, another LBW victim.

11.34am Asad Shafiq, 16 (231-5): An exceptional one-handed diving catch from Prior does for Shafiq, who had edges one from Jimmy Anderson.

1.14pm Misbah-ul-Haq, 52 (283-6): A review removes Misbah: a sharp Swann off-break did not convince Billy Bowden but HawkEye gives him out.

1.19pm Abdur Rehman, 4 (288-7): England finish on a high as Anderson clips Rehman's off-stump with a beauty that shapes into the left-hander.

Dubai scoreboard

First Test, Dubai International Cricket Stadium. Second day of five; England won toss

England: First Innings 192 (†M J Prior 70*; Ajmal 7-55)

Pakistan: First Innings (overnight: 42-0)

Mohammad Hafeez lbw b Swann 88, 164 balls 11 fours 1 six

Taufeeq Umar b Broad 58, 113 balls 10 fours

Azhar Ali c Prior b Broad 1, 8 balls

Younis Khan lbw b Trott 37, 87 balls 4 fours

*Misbah ul-Haq lbw b Swann 52, 154 balls 5 fours

Shafiq c Prior b Anderson 16, 33 balls 1 four

†Akmal not out 24, 67 balls 3 fours

Rehman b Anderson 4, 3 balls 1 four

Extras (b2 lb4 nb2 pens 0) 8

Total 7 wkts (104.3 overs) 288

Fall 1-114 2-128 3-176 4-202 5-231 6-283 7-288.

To bat Umar Gul, Saeed Ajmal, Aizaz Cheema.

Bowling Anderson 23.3-7-57-2, Tremlett 20-6-48-0, Broad 26-6-72-2, Swann 27-3-89-2, Trott 8-2-16-1.

Umpires B F Bowden (Aus) and B N J Oxenford (Aus).

Third Umpire S J Davis (Aus).

Match referee J Srinath (India).

Remaining Tests

25-29 January Second Test (Abu Dhabi).

3-7 February Third Test (Dubai).

Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Life and Style
Baroness Lane-Fox warned that large companies such as have become so powerful that governments and regulators are left behind
techTech giants have left governments and regulators behind
News
Keith Fraser says we should give Isis sympathises free flights to join Isis (AFP)
news
Life and Style
'Prison Architect' players decide the fate of inmates
tech
Life and Style
A picture taken on February 11, 2014 at people walking at sunrise on the Trocadero Esplanade, also known as the Parvis des droits de l'homme (Parvis of Human Rights), in front of the Eiffel Tower in Paris.
techGoogle celebrates Paris's iconic landmark, which opened to the public 126 years ago today
News
Cleopatra the tortoise suffers from a painful disease that causes her shell to disintegrate; her new prosthetic one has been custom-made for her using 3D printing technology
newsCleopatra had been suffering from 'pyramiding'
News
people
Arts and Entertainment
Coachella and Lollapalooza festivals have both listed the selfie stick devices as “prohibited items”
music
Sport
Nigel Owens was targeted on Twitter because of his sexuality during the Six Nations finale between England and France earlier this month
rugbyReferee Nigel Owens on coming out, and homophobic Twitter abuse
Caption competition
Caption competition
  • Get to the point
Latest stories from i100
Daily Quiz
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

Career Services

Day In a Page

No postcode? No vote

Floating voters

How living on a houseboat meant I didn't officially 'exist'
Louis Theroux's affable Englishman routine begins to wear thin

By Reason of Insanity

Louis Theroux's affable Englishman routine begins to wear thin
Power dressing is back – but no shoulderpads!

Power dressing is back

But banish all thoughts of Eighties shoulderpads
Spanish stone-age cave paintings 'under threat' after being re-opened to the public

Spanish stone-age cave paintings in Altamira 'under threat'

Caves were re-opened to the public
'I was the bookies’ favourite to be first to leave the Cabinet'

Vince Cable interview

'I was the bookies’ favourite to be first to leave the Cabinet'
Election 2015: How many of the Government's coalition agreement promises have been kept?

Promises, promises

But how many coalition agreement pledges have been kept?
The Gaza fisherman who built his own reef - and was shot dead there by an Israeli gunboat

The death of a Gaza fisherman

He built his own reef, and was fatally shot there by an Israeli gunboat
Saudi Arabia's airstrikes in Yemen are fuelling the Gulf's fire

Saudi airstrikes are fuelling the Gulf's fire

Arab intervention in Yemen risks entrenching Sunni-Shia divide and handing a victory to Isis, says Patrick Cockburn
Zayn Malik's departure from One Direction shows the perils of fame in the age of social media

The only direction Zayn could go

We wince at the anguish of One Direction's fans, but Malik's departure shows the perils of fame in the age of social media
Young Magician of the Year 2015: Meet the schoolgirl from Newcastle who has her heart set on being the competition's first female winner

Spells like teen spirit

A 16-year-old from Newcastle has set her heart on being the first female to win Young Magician of the Year. Jonathan Owen meets her
Jonathan Anderson: If fashion is a cycle, this young man knows just how to ride it

If fashion is a cycle, this young man knows just how to ride it

British designer Jonathan Anderson is putting his stamp on venerable house Loewe
Number plates scheme could provide a licence to offend in the land of the free

Licence to offend in the land of the free

Cash-strapped states have hit on a way of making money out of drivers that may be in collision with the First Amendment, says Rupert Cornwell
From farm to fork: Meet the Cornish fishermen, vegetable-growers and butchers causing a stir in London's top restaurants

From farm to fork in Cornwall

One man is bringing together Cornwall's most accomplished growers, fishermen and butchers with London's best chefs to put the finest, freshest produce on the plates of some of the country’s best restaurants
Robert Parker interview: The world's top wine critic on tasting 10,000 bottles a year, absurd drinking notes and New World wannabes

Robert Parker interview

The world's top wine critic on tasting 10,000 bottles a year, absurd drinking notes and New World wannabes
Don't believe the stereotype - or should you?

Don't believe the stereotype - or should you?

We exaggerate regional traits and turn them into jokes - and those on the receiving end are in on it too, says DJ Taylor