Vaughan confirms retirement from cricket

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Michael Vaughan has confirmed his retirement from all forms of cricket.

The England and Wales Cricket Board confirmed the 34-year-old's decision ahead of a scheduled press conference at Edgbaston.



Vaughan, who famously led England to their first Ashes series victory in a generation four years ago, had been hoping to regain form and fitness in time to re-engage with the old enemy this summer.



But with both elements proving elusive, the Yorkshire batsman accepted the inevitable.



Vaughan said: "After a great deal of consideration, I've decided that now is the right time to retire from cricket.

"It has been an enormous privilege to have played for and captained my country and this is one of the hardest decisions I have had to make.



"Having played almost non-stop for 16 seasons, I feel the time is right for the focus to shift to the next generation.



"We have some fantastic talent coming through the English counties and, with the next Ashes series upon us, now is the time for the younger players to rise to the challenge of building on the success achieved in English cricket in the last few years."



Reflecting on the backing he has had throughout his career, Vaughan added: "I'd like to record my sincere thanks to the England fans and the ECB and the members and supporters of Yorkshire County Cricket Club for their unstinting backing throughout my career, as well as my wife Nicola and the rest of my family who have been equally supportive.



"I'm also extremely grateful to all the players, managers, coaches, media and administrators I've worked with, who have all contributed to making my career so enjoyable and fulfilling.



"I'd also like to wish Andrew Strauss and the current England team success in this Ashes series. I know they have the drive, ambition and abilities to repeat the success from 2005. Winning that series was most definitely the high point of my career."

ECB chief executive David Collier said: "Everyone associated with cricket in England and Wales will be forever grateful to Michael Vaughan for his immense contribution to the England team's success.

"His achievement in leading England to victory against the number one ranked team in the world, Australia in 2005, was arguably the finest by any England captain in the modern era."



Hugh Morris, ECB's managing director England Cricket, said: "As an international captain Michael ranks among the very best and the way in which he and Duncan Fletcher forged a team capable of winning six consecutive Test series stands as testament to his ability to inspire and motivate those around him.



"He was also a marvellous ambassador for England cricket off-the-field as well as on it and someone who genuinely appreciated the generous support he received from the thousands of England supporters who follow the team at home and abroad.



"No-one who saw his magnificent hundreds in Australia in 2002-03 will forget the contribution he made to the team as a batsman either - he will be rightly remembered as a player of the highest class."



England captain Andrew Strauss said: "I count Michael as a good friend as well as a team-mate and I know what a tough decision this will have been for him as he took so much pleasure and pride in representing his country.



"I learned a great deal from watching him captain the side for five years at close hand and his ability to identify a new strategy for outwitting the opposition, or bring the best out of his own players was a priceless asset.



"But more than anything we as players will miss the enormous sense of fun and enjoyment that Michael brought to the dressing room.



"He will be missed by everyone connected with the team and we wish him every success in his future career."



Yorkshire CCC CEO Stewart Regan said: "Michael Vaughan is a class act and will be remembered by Yorkshire members and supporters around the world for his beautiful stroke play and of course his success in leading England to Ashes glory in 2005."



"It has been a pleasure and a privilege for me to get to know Michael over the past three years and his presence around the club has been hugely motivational, particularly the younger players.



"I wish him every success in the future and hope that he continues to take more than a passing interest in the fortunes of Yorkshire CCC. On behalf of the Board of Directors, I would like to personally thank him for his magnificent contribution not only to Yorkshire but to the game of cricket as a whole."





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