West Indies Tour: Despite their best efforts, Stuart Broad’s England finally record a win

England 163-7 (44.4 overs) beat West Indies 159 (44.2 overs) by three wickets

Sir Vivian Richards Stadium

England worked their socks off on Sunday to attain their default position of losing. But somehow, try as they might, their propensity for mucking things up in style was not quite up to scratch for once and they hobbled to victory against West Indies by three wickets to leave the one-day series level at 1-1 with one match to play.

It was the performance of a team who had forgotten how to win and were not quite sure that this was their objective in life. Chasing a meagre 160 after a bowling performance which stifled their opponents and brought a man-of-the-match award for the Lancashire left-arm spinner Stephen Parry on his debut, they faltered badly in mid-innings to lose four wickets for 10 runs.

That left them at 89 for six but to suggest that they held their nerve thereafter to reach the line would be a slight exaggeration.

A run out at 105, caused partly by English daftness, partly by West Indian brilliance, left them still with much to do and with four overs of the mystifying spinner Sunil Narine to negotiate.

Their captain Stuart Broad then lived as dangerously as is possible without actually surrendering your wicket. He survived (rightly) a review after he was given out caught behind, offered three catching chances and even when victory was in sight almost contrived to run himself out.

Fortunately, a neat, almost serenely calm innings by Ravi Bopara, playing in his 101st one-day international, was exactly what was required. Bopara, in a way he had not always done in his previous hundred matches, surveyed the scene, weighed his options and recognised that with plenty of overs and a small target simple crease occupation would do the trick. For once he did not try anything risky although there was the occasional flash of delight, in particular one cover drive for four off Darren Sammy, which has too often kept concealed on the biggest stage. His unbeaten 38 from 59 balls was invaluable both in the context of the match and England’s uncertain progress since last summer.

Broad said: “It should give the changing room a tremendous amount of confidence and belief because we haven’t won two games in a row since July. That’s almost why you play sport. It’s why it’s awesome. It could have gone either way.

“We rode a bit of luck but ended up coming out in top and I would have been very disappointed to be sitting here 2-0 down after our bowling performance. Our spinners always looked dangerous, we took wickets regularly and our fielding reflected the hard work we’ve done on that.”

The batting of both sides in this brief series has been short of the necessary standard so far, a litany of errors caused by callowness, stupidity or both. England, packed with spinners, played the conditions superbly, however, and their fielding was as assured as it has been in any match this winter.

One catch in particular, by James Tredwell, sticking out his right hand at slip, was outstanding. Tredwell must fool many a batsman by his complete lack of athletic gait but he fields with alacrity and again bowled cannily.

Parry helped to tie up the middle of the innings and took three wickets in the process, including that of the Lendl Simmons, the match’s top scorer, who he had caught on the boundary the ball after hitting a six. If that wicket was important, so was that of the West Indies captain, Dwayne Bravo, which was also controversial.

Bravo wandered down the wicket to Tredwell, was deceived in flight and should have been stumped by a country mile. Jos Buttler, however, dropped the ball as he removed the bails and was lucky to have the decision upheld. It was not clear whether it was ball or gloves which touched the stumps first.

England lost Moeen Ali to a piece of carelessness as he pulled into the wind and then a hapless Luke Wright who was out of his depth for an over against Narine before he was bowled. When Michael Lumb and Joe Root developed a partnership, however, England were cruising.

But Lumb was lbw stuck on the crease, Root, pushed one back to the bowler rather limply, Buttler was out first ball, feathering a bouncer, and Ben Stokes walked after gloving one on to his pad. When Tim Bresnan was run out after Bravo pulled off a spectacular stop and throw, the batsman making the mistake of thinking it had sizzled past, chaos loomed once more.

Broad lived perilously in playing some needless attacking strokes but he survived intact.

Bopara looked nothing less than composed and England had won their second match in the winter, with 31 balls to spare.

Suggested Topics
News
A 1930 image of the Karl Albrecht Spiritousen and Lebensmittel shop, Essen. The shop was opened by Karl and Theo Albrecht’s mother; the brothers later founded Aldi
people
Arts and Entertainment
Flora Spencer-Longhurst as Lavinia, William Houston as Titus Andronicus and Dyfan Dwyfor as Lucius
theatreThe Shakespeare play that proved too much for more than 100 people
News
exclusivePunk icon Viv Albertine on Sid Vicious, complacent white men, and why free love led to rape
Arts and Entertainment
Standing the test of time: Michael J Fox and Christopher Lloyd in 'Back to the Future'
filmA cult movie event aims to immerse audiences of 80,000 in ‘Back to the Future’. But has it lost its magic?
PROMOTED VIDEO
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Arts and Entertainment
Stir crazy: Noel Fielding in 'Luxury Comedy 2: Tales from Painted Hawaii'
comedyAs ‘Luxury Comedy’ returns, Noel Fielding on why mainstream success scares him and what the future holds for 'The Boosh'
Life and Style
Flow chart: Karl Landsteiner discovered blood types in 1900, yet scientists have still not come up with an explanation for their existence
lifeAll of us have one. Yet even now, it’s a matter of debate what they’re for
Arts and Entertainment
'Weird Al' Yankovic, or Alfred Matthew, at the 2014 Los Angeles Film Festival Screening of
musicHis latest video is an ode to good grammar. But what do our experts think he’s missed out?
Sport
Colombia's James Rodriguez celebrates one of his goals during the FIFA World Cup 2014 round of 16 match between Colombia and Uruguay at the Estadio do Maracana in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
sportColombian World Cup star completes £63m move to Spain
Arts and Entertainment
booksThe best children's books for this summer
Life and Style
News to me: family events were recorded in the personal columns
techFamily events used to be marked in the personal columns. But now Facebook has usurped that
News
news
News
i100
Travel
Fair trade: the idea of honesty boxes relies on people paying their way
travelIt seems fraught with financial risk, but the policy has its benefits
News
people
Sport
Antoine Griezmann has started two of France’s four games so far
sport
Life and Style
Child's play: letting young people roam outdoors directly contradicts the current climate
lifeHow much independence should children have?
Arts and Entertainment
Tycoons' text: Warren Buffett and Bill Gates both cite John Brookes' 'Business Adventures' as their favourite book
booksFind out why America's richest men are reading John Brookes
Caption competition
Caption competition
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Daily Quiz
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

Career Services

Day In a Page

Noel Fielding's 'Luxury Comedy': A land of the outright bizarre

Noel Fielding's 'Luxury Comedy'

A land of the outright bizarre
What are the worst 'Word Crimes'?

What are the worst 'Word Crimes'?

‘Weird Al’ Yankovic's latest video is an ode to good grammar. But what do The Independent’s experts think he’s missed out?
Can Secret Cinema sell 80,000 'Back to the Future' tickets?

The worst kept secret in cinema

A cult movie event aims to immerse audiences of 80,000 in ‘Back to the Future’. But has it lost its magic?
Facebook: The new hatched, matched and dispatched

The new hatched, matched and dispatched

Family events used to be marked in the personal columns. But now Facebook has usurped the ‘Births, Deaths and Marriages’ announcements
Why do we have blood types?

Are you my type?

All of us have one but probably never wondered why. Yet even now, a century after blood types were discovered, it’s a matter of debate what they’re for
Honesty box hotels: You decide how much you pay

Honesty box hotels

Five hotels in Paris now allow guests to pay only what they think their stay was worth. It seems fraught with financial risk, but the honesty policy has its benefit
Some are reformed drug addicts. Some are single mums. All are on benefits. But now these so-called 'scroungers’ are fighting back

The 'scroungers’ fight back

The welfare claimants battling to alter stereotypes
Amazing video shows Nasa 'flame extinguishment experiment' in action

Fireballs in space

Amazing video shows Nasa's 'flame extinguishment experiment' in action
A Bible for billionaires

A Bible for billionaires

Find out why America's richest men are reading John Brookes
Paranoid parenting is on the rise - and our children are suffering because of it

Paranoid parenting is on the rise

And our children are suffering because of it
For sale: Island where the Magna Carta was sealed

Magna Carta Island goes on sale

Yours for a cool £4m
Phone hacking scandal special report: The slide into crime at the 'News of the World'

The hacker's tale: the slide into crime at the 'News of the World'

Glenn Mulcaire was jailed for six months for intercepting phone messages. James Hanning tells his story in a new book. This is an extract
We flinch, but there are degrees of paedophilia

We flinch, but there are degrees of paedophilia

Child abusers are not all the same, yet the idea of treating them differently in relation to the severity of their crimes has somehow become controversial
The truth about conspiracy theories is that some require considering

The truth about conspiracy theories is that some require considering

For instance, did Isis kill the Israeli teenagers to trigger a war, asks Patrick Cockburn
Alistair Carmichael: 'The UK as a whole is greater than the sum of its parts'

Alistair Carmichael: 'The UK as a whole is greater than the sum of its parts'

Meet the man who doesn't want to go down in history as the country's last Scottish Secretary