Lance Armstrong faces £12m bill for doping lie

 

Lance Armstrong has moved a step nearer getting a bill for about $20m (£12m) for lying under oath about his use of performance-enhancing drugs when securing prize money from insurance company SCA Promotions.

A Texas judge rejected Armstrong's request to prevent an arbitration panel from reviewing the bonuses he was paid during his Tour de France winning streak.

The United States Anti-Doping Agency last year stripped him of all results dating back to 1 August 1998 – including seven successive Tour de France titles – for doping, something he belatedly confessed to on Oprah Winfrey in January 2013.

The SCA case goes back to 2006. After promising Armstrong a bonus, his United States Postal Service team protected itself against that potential financial liability through a policy from SCA Promotions – the company specialises in assuming risks associated with prizes. Because a French book detailed allegations of doping against Armstrong in 2004, SCA initially balked at paying. After a protracted arbitration process, including gaining Armstrong's denial of doping under oath, the insurer ultimately agreed to the policy.

SCA Promotions is now seeking the return of $12m – Tour de France prize money of $1.5m in 2002, $3m in 2003 and $5m in 2004, plus $2.5m in costs paid in 2004 – plus interest, costs and damages.

Jeff Tillotson, an attorney for SCA Promotions, said: "It is beyond dispute that he perjured himself in our [2006] proceeding. The only thing left to resolve is in what manner should he be punished. He should not be allowed to retain the benefits he got from lying. He used his lies to obtain more than $10 million from us."

The arbitration panel will meet next month to discuss the case, which is a civil proceeding. The statute of limitations means he avoids criminal charges.

PROMOTED VIDEO
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Caption competition
Caption competition
Latest stories from i100
Daily Quiz
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

iJobs Job Widget
iJobs General

Austen Lloyd: Corporate Tax Solicitor - Nottingham

Excellent Salary : Austen Lloyd: NOTTINGHAM - A rare high quality opportunity ...

Recruitment Genius: Tax Manager

£45000 - £65000 per annum: Recruitment Genius: Progressive practice, punching ...

Recruitment Genius: Ruby On Rails Developer

£45000 - £50000 per annum: Recruitment Genius: This is a fantastic opportunity...

Recruitment Genius: PHP Web Developer

£25000 - £35000 per annum: Recruitment Genius: This an exciting opportunity to...

In a world of Saudi bullying, right-wing Israeli ministers and the twilight of Obama, Iran is looking like a possible policeman of the Gulf

Iran is shifting from pariah to possible future policeman of the Gulf

Robert Fisk on our crisis with Iran
The young are the new poor: A third of young people pushed into poverty

The young are the new poor

Sharp increase in the number of under-25s living in poverty
Greens on the march: ‘We could be on the edge of something very big’

Greens on the march

‘We could be on the edge of something very big’
Revealed: the case against Bill Cosby - through the stories of his accusers

Revealed: the case against Bill Cosby

Through the stories of his accusers
Why are words like 'mongol' and 'mongoloid' still bandied about as insults?

The Meaning of Mongol

Why are the words 'mongol' and 'mongoloid' still bandied about as insults?
Mau Mau uprising: Kenyans still waiting for justice join class action over Britain's role in the emergency

Kenyans still waiting for justice over Mau Mau uprising

Thousands join class action over Britain's role in the emergency
Isis in Iraq: The trauma of the last six months has overwhelmed the remaining Christians in the country

The last Christians in Iraq

After 2,000 years, a community will try anything – including pretending to convert to Islam – to avoid losing everything, says Patrick Cockburn
Black Friday: Helpful discounts for Christmas shoppers, or cynical marketing by desperate retailers?

Helpful discounts for Christmas shoppers, or cynical marketing by desperate retailers?

Britain braced for Black Friday
Bill Cosby's persona goes from America's dad to date-rape drugs

From America's dad to date-rape drugs

Stories of Bill Cosby's alleged sexual assaults may have circulated widely in Hollywood, but they came as a shock to fans, says Rupert Cornwell
Clare Balding: 'Women's sport is kicking off at last'

Clare Balding: 'Women's sport is kicking off at last'

As fans flock to see England women's Wembley debut against Germany, the TV presenter on an exciting 'sea change'
Oh come, all ye multi-faithful: The Christmas jumper is in fashion, but should you wear your religion on your sleeve?

Oh come, all ye multi-faithful

The Christmas jumper is in fashion, but should you wear your religion on your sleeve?
Dr Charles Heatley: The GP off to do battle in the war against Ebola

The GP off to do battle in the war against Ebola

Dr Charles Heatley on joining the NHS volunteers' team bound for Sierra Leone
Flogging vlogging: First video bloggers conquered YouTube. Now they want us to buy their books

Flogging vlogging

First video bloggers conquered YouTube. Now they want us to buy their books
Saturday Night Live vs The Daily Show: US channels wage comedy star wars

Saturday Night Live vs The Daily Show

US channels wage comedy star wars
When is a wine made in Piedmont not a Piemonte wine? When EU rules make Italian vineyards invisible

When is a wine made in Piedmont not a Piemonte wine?

When EU rules make Italian vineyards invisible