Football: Sportsman who inspired a nation: Bobby Moore, hero of England: born 12 April 1941, died 24 February 1993

BOBBY MOORE fought his last terrible battle to the very end, with a courage and dignity which he hoped would inspire others, as his football had done for a generation and more. The game has been graced with few men of such exemplary character - on and off the field.

Desperately ill, he had summoned the strength last Wednesday for one final visit to Wembley, the scene of his greatest triumph, but he was clearly in some distress during England's World Cup tie against San Marino, when he bravely contrived to supply his usual expert analysis for a commercial radio station.

He had hoped to make what he knew would be a farewell visit to his beloved West Ham, for their match at home to Newcastle United last Sunday, but was too unwell to do so.

The Upton Park crowd, many of whom were too young to have seen him play, offered up the simplest of prayers for their stricken hero by repeatedly chanting his name.

Geoff Hurst was the Roy of the Rovers whose hat-trick won the World Cup in 1966, Martin Peters was the midfielder lauded for being '10 years ahead of his time', but 'Mooro' was The Man - a captain so cool and composed that he remembered to wipe his sweaty palms before receiving the Jules Rimet Trophy from the Queen.

If 1966 was his finest hour, it was the Mexico World Cup, four years on, which saw him at his peak. Utterly unflappable, with an uncanny positional sense which made him the master of the interception, he was then, by common consent, the best defender in the world.

Pele, unrivalled among all his opponents, described Moore, unequivocally, as the best he ever played against. This from a living legend whose career spanned 30 years.

It is common, in these circumstances, to skirt round character defects and eulogise lovely players as lovely men. Two or three of that 1966 team would be flattered by the latter half of such a description, but Moore, among all others, was the genuine article. In every sense.

Modest to a fault, he was always more interested in hearing the opinions of others than he was in expounding his own. Courteous, above all else, he was obliging his multitude of admirers with autographs and small talk right up to the end.

Strikingly unpretentious, he seemed not to notice when current England players, who should have been begging him for advice, rubbed shoulders in hotel or stadium without a word. Paul Gascoigne was a notable exception.

Amid all the tributes which flooded in like tears, one heartfelt reminiscence will linger long in the memory. It came from a leading football writer who was a cub reporter with a London sports agency when Moore was at the height of his powers, and fame.

Kindness personified, the captain of England took the fresh-faced innocent under his wing and regularly ferried him from West Ham's training ground, at Chadwell Heath, back into central London.

After several such journeys the Great Man turned to his down-at-heel passenger and said: 'We can't have you riding around with me unless you look the part.' The next day, when the teenager climbed into the Moore Jaguar, there on the back seat was a mohair suit which made the indentured apprentice the best-dressed hack in Fleet Street. It would not happen now. Football, like society in general, wears a meaner face these days.

Moore was symbolic of the Sixties, a happier time before hooliganism and greed took hold. Today's heroes would have sold our friend his suit - then charged him for an interview.

Moore's generosity of spirit made it all the more sad that one of the finest ambassadors the game has seen was unable to pass on his peerless expertise on the field when he turned to management.

After a brief spell in charge at Southend United ended unhappily, and any aspirations he had in that direction were to remain unfulfilled. It was one more thing he had in common with Hurst and Peters, Ball and Bobby Charlton. Managerial success has eluded the Lions of '66, Jack Charlton excepted.

Appropriately enough, it was Bobby Charlton - the only English player who matched Moore's celebrity - who paid the first of the many tributes last night.

His old friend had been a 'gentle man,' Charlton said. 'He was very kind, very courteous, and always did things with great dignity.'

Manchester United's favourite son added that he preferred to remember Moore as a rounded person, rather than a footballer.

'He was a very stylish player, a leader who made a fantastic contribution to the game, but as a man he always did things in a classy manner, with a lot of style.'

Obituary, page 29

East End tribute, page 33

(Photographs omitted)

PROMOTED VIDEO
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Caption competition
Caption competition
Latest stories from i100
Daily Quiz
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

Career Services
iJobs Job Widget
iJobs General

Tradewind Recruitment: English Teacher

Negotiable: Tradewind Recruitment: My client is an excellent, large partially ...

Tradewind Recruitment: Science Teacher

£90 - £140 per day: Tradewind Recruitment: I am currently working in partnersh...

Tradewind Recruitment: Year 3 Primary Teacher

£100 - £150 per day: Tradewind Recruitment: Year 3 Teacher Birmingham Jan 2015...

Ashdown Group: Lead Web Developer (ASP.NET, C#) - City of London

£45000 - £50000 per annum + Excellent benefits: Ashdown Group: Lead Web Develo...

Day In a Page

Isis hostage crisis: The prisoner swap has only one purpose for the militants - recognition its Islamic State exists and that foreign nations acknowledge its power

Isis hostage crisis

The prisoner swap has only one purpose for the militants - recognition its Islamic State exists and that foreign nations acknowledge its power, says Robert Fisk
Missing salvage expert who found $50m of sunken treasure before disappearing, tracked down at last

The runaway buccaneers and the ship full of gold

Salvage expert Tommy Thompson found sunken treasure worth millions. Then he vanished... until now
Homeless Veterans appeal: ‘If you’re hard on the world you are hard on yourself’

Homeless Veterans appeal: ‘If you’re hard on the world you are hard on yourself’

Maverick artist Grayson Perry backs our campaign
Assisted Dying Bill: I want to be able to decide about my own death - I want to have control of my life

Assisted Dying Bill: 'I want control of my life'

This week the Assisted Dying Bill is debated in the Lords. Virginia Ironside, who has already made plans for her own self-deliverance, argues that it's time we allowed people a humane, compassionate death
Move over, kale - cabbage is the new rising star

Cabbage is king again

Sophie Morris banishes thoughts of soggy school dinners and turns over a new leaf
11 best winter skin treats

Give your moisturiser a helping hand: 11 best winter skin treats

Get an extra boost of nourishment from one of these hard-working products
Paul Scholes column: The more Jose Mourinho attempts to influence match officials, the more they are likely to ignore him

Paul Scholes column

The more Jose Mourinho attempts to influence match officials, the more they are likely to ignore him
Frank Warren column: No cigar, but pots of money: here come the Cubans

Frank Warren's Ringside

No cigar, but pots of money: here come the Cubans
Isis hostage crisis: Militant group stands strong as its numerous enemies fail to find a common plan to defeat it

Isis stands strong as its numerous enemies fail to find a common plan to defeat it

The jihadis are being squeezed militarily and economically, but there is no sign of an implosion, says Patrick Cockburn
Virtual reality thrusts viewers into the frontline of global events - and puts film-goers at the heart of the action

Virtual reality: Seeing is believing

Virtual reality thrusts viewers into the frontline of global events - and puts film-goers at the heart of the action
Homeless Veterans appeal: MP says Coalition ‘not doing enough’

Homeless Veterans appeal

MP says Coalition ‘not doing enough’ to help
Larry David, Steve Coogan and other comedians share stories of depression in new documentary

Comedians share stories of depression

The director of the new documentary, Kevin Pollak, tells Jessica Barrett how he got them to talk
Has The Archers lost the plot with it's spicy storylines?

Has The Archers lost the plot?

A growing number of listeners are voicing their discontent over the rural soap's spicy storylines; so loudly that even the BBC's director-general seems worried, says Simon Kelner
English Heritage adds 14 post-war office buildings to its protected lists

14 office buildings added to protected lists

Christopher Beanland explores the underrated appeal of these palaces of pen-pushing
Human skull discovery in Israel proves humans lived side-by-side with Neanderthals

Human skull discovery in Israel proves humans lived side-by-side with Neanderthals

Scientists unearthed the cranial fragments from Manot Cave in West Galilee