Hughes makes the most of his second chance

Sunderland 1 Notts County 2

With their combined efforts, Notts County and Stevenage have ensured that this weekend's Tyne-Wear derby will on both sides be as much about righting significant wrongs as a battle for north-eastern football supremacy.

Having served three years in prison for causing death by dangerous driving, Lee Hughes knows all about attempting to make up for past misdemeanours that are rather more serious than the loss off a football match, however much emotional investment was made by both sets of fans on Saturday here.

The 34-year-old County forward received the now customary abuse from home supporters during his side's stirring FA Cup third round victory. He replied in the only way he allows himself to, doubling his side's advantage with his 10th goal of the season from a narrow angle 15 minutes from time, this after playing a central role in County's disputed early opener, which saw goalkeeper Simon Mignolet fumble Craig Westcarr's shot into his net thanks to Hughes' overtly physical presence, one that was overlooked by the officials.

"You take the abuse on the chin," the forward insisted after his sixth goal in seven games took the 1894 winners into the next round. He added: "The best response is to put the ball in the back of the net. I understand the abuse. When I was in prison I never thought I'd play on a stage like this. I'm gutted about what happened and I'm grateful to get a second chance. I feel lucky to be playing football again."

It's hard to have any sympathy with Sunderland manager Steve Bruce, who in sending out a much-changed line-up, fell short on both respecting the opposition and the competition with almost predictable results. The assortment of reserves and recalls amid the sprinkling of first-team regulars was still worth the thick end of £50m, somewhat in excess of Paul Ince's collection of has-beens and those who never quite were, who sit 52 places below them. Hughes admitted: "I don't think anyone in our starting line-up cost a penny."

Darren Bent made for an uncomfortable finale for the visitors, converting an 81st-minute penalty after Ricky Ravenhill tripped Andy Reid, one of few Sunderland players to emerge with any credit. An 11th goal of the season was the only notable contribution from Bent or Asamoah Gyan, his partner in a £25m front two that is struggling to click. They weren't alone. Marcos Angeleri has impressed enough to have played for Argentina while Paulo da Silva and Cristian Riveros stood out for Paraguay at the World Cup.

"To go out like that was pathetic," Bruce, a three-time FA Cup-winner with Manchester United, two of those alongside Ince, admitted. He added: "Players have been knocking on my door asking for a chance but some of them did themselves no favours."

Sunderland (4-4-2): Mignolet; Angeleri (Bardsley, 70), Da Silva, Ferdinand, Richardson; Reid, Colback (Henderson, 61), Riveros (Elmohamady, 60), Malbranque; Bent, Gyan. Substitutes not used: Carson (gk), Reed, Adams, Bramble.

Notts County (4-4-2) Nelson; Thompson, Pearce, Edwards, Harley; Davies, Bishop, Ravenhill, Judge (Hunt, 79); Westcarr (Hawley, 89), Hughes (Woods, 85). Substitutes not used: Mitchell (gk), Lee, Burgess, Sodje.

Referee: S Attwell (Warwickshire)

Booked: Notts County Bishop, Nelson.

Possession: Sunderland 52% Notts County 48%

Shots on target: Sunderland 2 Notts County 3

Man of the match Hughes Rating 7/10

Attendance: 17,582

Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Caption competition
Caption competition
Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?

Bleacher Report

Daily Quiz
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

Day In a Page

Syrian conflict is the world's first 'climate change war', say scientists, but it won't be the last one

Climate change key in Syrian conflict

And it will trigger more war in future
How I outwitted the Gestapo

How I outwitted the Gestapo

My life as a Jew in wartime Berlin
The nation's favourite animal revealed

The nation's favourite animal revealed

Women like cuddly creatures whilst men like creepy-crawlies
Is this the way to get young people to vote?

Getting young people to vote

From #VOTESELFISH to Bite the Ballot
Poldark star Heida Reed: 'I don't think a single bodice gets ripped'

Poldark star Heida Reed

'I don't think a single bodice gets ripped'
The difference between America and Israel? There isn’t one

The difference between America and Israel? There isn’t one

Netanyahu knows he can get away with anything in America, says Robert Fisk
Families clubbing together to build their own affordable accommodation

Do It Yourself approach to securing a new house

Community land trusts marking a new trend for taking the initiative away from developers
Head of WWF UK: We didn’t send Cameron to the Arctic to see green ideas freeze

David Nussbaum: We didn’t send Cameron to the Arctic to see green ideas freeze

The head of WWF UK remains sanguine despite the Government’s failure to live up to its pledges on the environment
Author Kazuo Ishiguro on being inspired by shoot-outs and samurai

Author Kazuo Ishiguro on being inspired by shoot-outs and samurai

Set in a mythologised 5th-century Britain, ‘The Buried Giant’ is a strange beast
With money, corruption and drugs, this monk fears Buddhism in Thailand is a ‘poisoned fruit’

Money, corruption and drugs

The monk who fears Buddhism in Thailand is a ‘poisoned fruit’
America's first slavery museum established at Django Unchained plantation - 150 years after slavery outlawed

150 years after it was outlawed...

... America's first slavery museum is established in Louisiana
Kelly Clarkson: How I snubbed Simon Cowell and become a Grammy-winning superstar

Kelly Clarkson: How I snubbed Simon Cowell and become a Grammy-winning superstar

The first 'American Idol' winner on how she manages to remain her own woman – Jane Austen fascination and all
Tony Oursler on exploring our uneasy relationship with technology with his new show

You won't believe your eyes

Tony Oursler's new show explores our uneasy relationship with technology. He's one of a growing number of artists with that preoccupation
Ian Herbert: Peter Moores must go. He should never have been brought back to fail again

Moores must go. He should never have been brought back to fail again

The England coach leaves players to find solutions - which makes you wonder where he adds value, says Ian Herbert
War with Isis: Fears that the looming battle for Mosul will unleash 'a million refugees'

The battle for Mosul will unleash 'a million refugees'

Aid agencies prepare for vast exodus following planned Iraqi offensive against the Isis-held city, reports Patrick Cockburn