Neil Warnock assures Leeds fans El-Hadji Diouf 'will not go anywhere else'

 

Leeds fans should not worry about losing El-Hadji Diouf in the January transfer window following another stellar display, according to his manager, Neil Warnock.

The Senegal international was once again at the top of his game last night as Leeds bloodied the noses of Everton and sent the Premier League high-flyers packing in the Carling Cup at the third-round stage.

Goals from Aidy White and Rodolph Austin ensured the that Sylvain Distin's late header was nothing more than a consolation in a 2-1 defeat for Everton, but it was the showing of Diouf that got many talking.

He has rarely been a popular figure during his decade-long stay in England, with Warnock himself once comparing him to a sewer rat.

The pair have formed an unlikely double act at Elland Road, though, and even though Diouf could walk away from Leeds in January, Warnock is sure that they will remain as football's odd couple.

"Dioufy will not go anywhere else, he's promised me certain things and I'm happy with that," Warnock said.

"He's obviously not doing it for money, he's one of the lowest-paid players at the club. He's not going to get a stage like this again is he? He's a matador and you need something like that.

"It's no good going to Saudi Arabia or Dubai or wherever he was going for six or seven times the wages. He's better off with me, isn't he? He's given me his word, if that's worth it. He's been straight up with me and I've been straight up with him."

But while Warnock was left to purr about Diouf and claim that any side - including his own - left in the competition could win it, opposite number David Moyes headed back to Merseyside reflecting on another missed chance.

Despite the sterling work the Scot has done in his decade in charge at Goodison, a losing appearance in an FA Cup final is the nearest they have come to winning some silverware.

Assistant manager Steve Round spoke in the build-up to last night's tie about how this season could be Everton's time, but they failed to deliver, with a much-changed line-up simply not turning up.

Six players were rested from the side which beat Swansea 3-0 on Saturday, but Moyes was adamant that a poor start - White scored after four minutes - was to blame for the loss and not the alterations.

"We were not very good in the first half, but we got better in the second, but not as good as we've been playing," he said.

"We started terribly, gave them the initiative and lost the game in the opening 20 minutes due to the way we started. We gave away a really poor first goal and left ourselves trying to get back into the game."

On whether or not his decision to rest players was key, he added: "These boys are in the squad and have to be able to show they can come in and play. If you don't use them, what's the point in having them? The players want to play and be involved."

PA

Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Caption competition
Caption competition
  • Get to the point
Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?

Bleacher Report

Daily Quiz
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

Career Services

Day In a Page

Fishing for votes with Nigel Farage: The Ukip leader shows how he can work an audience as he casts his line to the disaffected of Grimsby

Fishing is on Nigel Farage's mind

Ukip leader casts a line to the disaffected
Who is bombing whom in the Middle East? It's amazing they don't all hit each other

Who is bombing whom in the Middle East?

Robert Fisk untangles the countries and factions
China's influence on fashion: At the top of the game both creatively and commercially

China's influence on fashion

At the top of the game both creatively and commercially
Lord O’Donnell: Former cabinet secretary on the election and life away from the levers of power

The man known as GOD has a reputation for getting the job done

Lord O'Donnell's three principles of rule
Rainbow shades: It's all bright on the night

Rainbow shades

It's all bright on the night
'It was first time I had ever tasted chocolate. I kept a piece, and when Amsterdam was liberated, I gave it to the first Allied soldier I saw'

Bread from heaven

Dutch survivors thank RAF for World War II drop that saved millions
Britain will be 'run for the wealthy and powerful' if Tories retain power - Labour

How 'the Axe' helped Labour

UK will be 'run for the wealthy and powerful' if Tories retain power
Rare and exclusive video shows the horrific price paid by activists for challenging the rule of jihadist extremists in Syria

The price to be paid for challenging the rule of extremists

A revolution now 'consuming its own children'
Welcome to the world of Megagames

Welcome to the world of Megagames

300 players take part in Watch the Skies! board game in London
'Nymphomaniac' actress reveals what it was really like to star in one of the most explicit films ever

Charlotte Gainsbourg on 'Nymphomaniac'

Starring in one of the most explicit films ever
Robert Fisk in Abu Dhabi: The Emirates' out-of-sight migrant workers helping to build the dream projects of its rulers

Robert Fisk in Abu Dhabi

The Emirates' out-of-sight migrant workers helping to build the dream projects of its rulers
Vince Cable interview: Charging fees for employment tribunals was 'a very bad move'

Vince Cable exclusive interview

Charging fees for employment tribunals was 'a very bad move'
Iwan Rheon interview: Game of Thrones star returns to his Welsh roots to record debut album

Iwan Rheon is returning to his Welsh roots

Rheon is best known for his role as the Bastard of Bolton. It's gruelling playing a sadistic torturer, he tells Craig McLean, but it hasn't stopped him recording an album of Welsh psychedelia
Morne Hardenberg interview: Cameraman for BBC's upcoming show Shark on filming the ocean's most dangerous predator

It's time for my close-up

Meet the man who films great whites for a living
Increasing numbers of homeless people in America keep their mobile phones on the streets

Homeless people keep mobile phones

A homeless person with a smartphone is a common sight in the US. And that's creating a network where the 'hobo' community can share information - and fight stigma - like never before