Capello set to stay as FA passes decision to Horne

Fabio Capello's future as England manager looked to be almost secure last night when senior figures in the Football Association decided to turn the decision over to the FA's only executive director, Alex Horne, which signals that they are not prepared to go hunting for a new coach.

Under pressure from the Premier League over his dual role with both organisations, Sir Dave Richards, who on Monday put himself in charge of the review process over Capello's position, has sought to pass on the public accountability for the decision. Horne is the only executive left on the FA board, after the resignations of chief executive Ian Watmore and chairman Lord Triesman. Richards has now decided Horne should be the public face of the decision on Capello, which looks likely to be to keep him. A source close to the process said yesterday that "barring a major change of heart" Capello will stay on.

In the chaos following Triesman's exit, Horne was fast-tracked in May into the role as FA general secretary – a newly created post. Although Horne is well-regarded at the FA, there is no way that Richards or the professional representatives on the main board would entrust him with the job of recruiting a new manager. That he has been installed as the nominal head of the process is a sign that the main board will decide that Capello is to be the manager for the forthcoming Euro 2012 qualification campaign.

With the FA in meltdown and Richards, the Premier League chairman, in power by default, all sorts of battles are going on behind the scenes. Perhaps the most critical is by Premier League chief executive, Richard Scudamore, who is angry that Richards' FA role – he sits on the board, is chairman of Club England and the international committee – creates a public perception that the Premier League is appointing England's manager. Richards has moved in recent days to speed up the process and divest himself of responsibility for deciding on Capello.

The FA will still hold a review, likely to be presented to the next main board meeting on 14 July, on what went wrong at the World Cup.

David Sheepshanks, a second influential FA main board member, appeared to give Capello some support yesterday in an interview with BBC Radio Suffolk. Phil Gartside, the Bolton Wanderers chairman, broke cover on Tuesday and gave his support to Capello. Between them the two men represent two of the five seats that the professional game holds on the FA board.

Sheepshanks said: "Knee-jerk reactions never work best. Fabio is tremendously able, one of the world's best managers and a month ago I don't think you'd have heard many people disagree with that."

It is thought that Capello will make changes if he stays. There are expected to be changes among his extensive back-room and support staff.

Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Latest in Sport
Sport
Caption competition
Caption competition
Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?

Bleacher Report

Daily Quiz
SPONSORED FEATURES
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

Career Services

Day In a Page

A groundbreaking study of 'Britain's Atlantis' long buried at the bottom of the North Sea could revolutionise how we see our prehistoric past

Britain's Atlantis

Scientific study beneath North Sea could revolutionise how we see the past
The Queen has 'done and said nothing that anybody will remember,' says Starkey

The Queen has 'done and said nothing that anybody will remember'

David Starkey's assessment
Oliver Sacks said his life has been 'an enormous privilege and adventure'

'An enormous privilege and adventure'

Oliver Sacks writing about his life
'Gibraltar is British, and it is going to stay British forever'

'Gibraltar is British, and it is going to stay British forever'

The Rock's Chief Minister hits back at Spanish government's 'lies'
Britain is still addicted to 'dirty coal'

Britain still addicted to 'dirty' coal

Biggest energy suppliers are more dependent on fossil fuel than a decade ago
Orthorexia nervosa: How becoming obsessed with healthy eating can lead to malnutrition

Orthorexia nervosa

How becoming obsessed with healthy eating can lead to malnutrition
Lady Chatterley is not obscene, says TV director

Lady Chatterley’s Lover

Director Jed Mercurio on why DH Lawrence's novel 'is not an obscene story'
Farmers in tropical forests are training ants to kill off bigger pests

Set a pest to catch a pest

Farmers in tropical forests are training ants to kill off bigger pests
Mexico: A culture that celebrates darkness as an essential part of life

The dark side of Mexico

A culture that celebrates darkness as an essential part of life
Being sexually assaulted was not your fault, Chrissie Hynde. Don't tell other victims it was theirs

Being sexually assaulted was not your fault, Chrissie Hynde

Please don't tell other victims it was theirs
A nap a day could save your life - and here's why

A nap a day could save your life

A midday nap is 'associated with reduced blood pressure'
If men are so obsessed by sex, why do they clam up when confronted with the grisly realities?

If men are so obsessed by sex...

...why do they clam up when confronted with the grisly realities?
The comedy titans of Avalon on their attempt to save BBC3

Jon Thoday and Richard Allen-Turner

The comedy titans of Avalon on their attempt to save BBC3
The bathing machine is back... but with a difference

Rolling in the deep

The bathing machine is back but with a difference
Part-privatised tests, new age limits, driverless cars: Tories plot motoring revolution

Conservatives plot a motoring revolution

Draft report reveals biggest reform to regulations since driving test introduced in 1935