Capello will make another late decision over keeper

Green winning back confidence of squad but manager refuses to change criticised policy of revealing line-up on match day

Fabio Capello will not change his "two-hour rule" of revealing the identity of the goalkeeper for England's game against Algeria on Friday close to kick-off, despite Robert Green's mistake against the United States last weekend.

The England manager has refused to bend on his practice of announcing the team – including goalkeeper – to his players two hours before kick-off, an approach that he has used throughout his time in charge of England apart from for occasional friendlies. The Italian is understood to be frustrated that his tried and tested methods are being blamed for Green's error that let in Clint Dempsey's equaliser on Saturday.

Those close to Capello say that it was not his late announcement that was the cause of Green losing concentration. One source said: "Fabio has achieved everything in his career with these methods, why should he change because of one mistake?"

After the game on Saturday, Capello said that the staff would assess Green "psychologically" in the build-up to Friday's match. The players have the option of sessions with the squad psychologist Christian Lattanzio, whose full-time job is with Green's club West Ham, but it is understood that Green has not taken up that option in the days since the US match.

The England players have been impressed by Green's resilience in the last two days – he was part of training again yesterday – and it would seem that he is under consideration again for Friday's match. The Capello camp themselves regard the mistake against the US as a one-off. Yesterday Capello's West Ham club-mate Matthew Upson said that the goalkeeper had responded well.

Upson said: "I think he [Green] has been exceptional. The comments he made after the game show that. Everyone can see the mistake. He acknowledged the mistake. I've never seen him make [a mistake before]. It's happened. You've got to get your concrete head on and do whatever will allow you to focus on performing well on Friday. He's tough. He's coped brilliantly. It's behind him, he knows what he's got to do. He's a big boy.

"It's done now. Forgotten about. Let's move on. We speak a lot. We're close and chat a lot about things. What I'm telling you is what he'd stand here and tell you: it's behind him and we've got to focus on the next game. He's desperate to play on Friday. He doesn't want to hide. He hasn't hidden since the moment he made the mistake.

"In the second half, his focus was really good. He made a really good save on to the post, and had a solid second half which is testament to him mentally. You've seen those incidents happen before and the rest of the game has been a write-off for people. That wasn't the case for him. That's really good."

Gareth Barry, meanwhile, has said that he is not feeling affected by the pressure of being regarded as the man who will give balance to England's midfield if, as expected, he makes his long-awaited return to the side against Algeria on Friday.

Barry, 29, was never a contender to play in Saturday's draw against the US but he is back in contention now for the first time since he damaged ankle ligaments playing for Manchester City against Tottenham on 5 May. Speaking for the first time since his injury he said that he was ready to play if Capello decides to switch back to his more familiar 4-2-3-1 formation.

Barry said: "It's important you try to stay calm. Everyone knows this is the World Cup and the pressure comes with that. The whole nation is up for it, supporting you, giving fantastic support. But we'll be going into games, if selected, trying to keep calm.

"Manchester City were brilliant [in getting me fit]. It wasn't their main target for me to get to the World Cup but they were brilliant. They said they would set me up with an oxygen tent at home to sleep in. We had a few hot days at home at the time and it was difficult to sleep. But it was one of those things you get used to eventually.

"It was always touch and go. I hadn't spoken to anybody from the [England] management staff here. I was nervous waiting for the phone call and eventually [general manager] Franco Baldini called me and wanted to hear from me how I felt and if I felt I had a really good chance."

News
people'It can last and it's terrifying'
Sport
Radamel Falcao
footballManchester United agree loan deal for Monaco striker Falcao
Sport
Louis van Gaal, Radamel Falcao, Arturo Vidal, Mats Hummels and Javier Hernandez
footballFalcao, Hernandez, Welbeck and every deal live as it happens
Sport
footballFeaturing Bart Simpson
PROMOTED VIDEO
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
News
peopleA spokesperson said the support group was 'extremely disappointed'
News
i100
Life and Style
techIf those brochure kitchens look a little too perfect to be true, well, that’s probably because they are
Arts and Entertainment
Alex Kapranos of Franz Ferdinand performs live
music Pro-independence show to take place four days before vote
News
news Video - hailed as 'most original' since Benedict Cumberbatch's
Arts and Entertainment
booksNovelist takes aim at Orwell's rules for writing plain English
Caption competition
Caption competition
Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?

Bleacher Report

Daily Quiz
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

Career Services

Day In a Page

Alexander Fury: The designer names to look for at fashion week this season

The big names to look for this fashion week

This week, designers begin to show their spring 2015 collections in New York
Will Self: 'I like Orwell's writing as much as the next talented mediocrity'

'I like Orwell's writing as much as the next talented mediocrity'

Will Self takes aim at Orwell's rules for writing plain English
Meet Afghanistan's middle-class paint-ballers

Meet Afghanistan's middle-class paint-ballers

Toy guns proving a popular diversion in a country flooded with the real thing
Al Pacino wows Venice

Al Pacino wows Venice

Ham among the brilliance as actor premieres two films at festival
Neil Lawson Baker interview: ‘I’ve gained so much from art. It’s only right to give something back’.

Neil Lawson Baker interview

‘I’ve gained so much from art. It’s only right to give something back’.
The other Mugabe who is lining up for the Zimbabwean presidency

The other Mugabe who is lining up for the Zimbabwean presidency

Wife of President Robert Mugabe appears to have her sights set on succeeding her husband
The model of a gadget launch: Cultivate an atmosphere of mystery and excitement to sell stuff people didn't realise they needed

The model for a gadget launch

Cultivate an atmosphere of mystery and excitement to sell stuff people didn't realise they needed
Alice Roberts: She's done pretty well, for a boffin without a beard

She's done pretty well, for a boffin without a beard

Alice Roberts talks about her new book on evolution - and why her early TV work drew flak from (mostly male) colleagues
Get well soon, Joan Rivers - an inspiration, whether she likes it or not

Get well soon, Joan Rivers

She is awful. But she's also wonderful, not in spite of but because of the fact she's forever saying appalling things, argues Ellen E Jones
Doctor Who Into the Dalek review: A classic sci-fi adventure with all the spectacle of a blockbuster

A fresh take on an old foe

Doctor Who Into the Dalek more than compensated for last week's nonsensical offering
Fashion walks away from the celebrity runway show

Fashion walks away from the celebrity runway show

As the collections start, fashion editor Alexander Fury finds video and the internet are proving more attractive
Meet the stars of TV's Wolf Hall... and it's not the cast of the Tudor trilogy

Meet the stars of TV's Wolf Hall...

... and it's not the cast of the Tudor trilogy
Weekend at the Asylum: Europe's biggest steampunk convention heads to Lincoln

Europe's biggest steampunk convention

Jake Wallis Simons discovers how Victorian ray guns and the martial art of biscuit dunking are precisely what the 21st century needs
Don't swallow the tripe – a user's guide to weasel words

Don't swallow the tripe – a user's guide to weasel words

Lying is dangerous and unnecessary. A new book explains the strategies needed to avoid it. John Rentoul on the art of 'uncommunication'
Daddy, who was Richard Attenborough? Was the beloved thespian the last of the cross-generation stars?

Daddy, who was Richard Attenborough?

The atomisation of culture means that few of those we regard as stars are universally loved any more, says DJ Taylor