Dunga's men face a leap into the unknown

Preview: Brazil v North Korea, Today, 7.30pm, ITV1

There was an inauspicious start yesterday for those who hoped that a place in the World Cup finals and a glittering opening fixture with Brazil might open up North Korea to the world. The team's coach Kim Jong-hun had barely limbered up for his press conference when someone mention the words "North Korea", which doesn't go down well since it implies the existence of a South Korea and a Park Ji-sung.

"Does North Korea plan to stick to a counter-attacking strategy against Brazil?" was the first question put Kim's way. "Among the 32 teams we are the Korea DPR, so please don't use any other name for our team," came the reply: a bold counter-attack. The Brazil part of the question was ignored. Cast into the media glare for the first time, Kim managed four mentions of Our Dear Leader (President Kim Jong-il), then experienced a level of dissent which would have been alien to him, ranging from the mischief of "Did you see South Korea beat Greece?" (No answer) to what his side are eating in South Africa ("We have special chefs to prepare Korean food for our players") via "Will you or the president pick the team for tomorrow?" (a Fifa media official, Gordon Glenn Watson, refused to allow that one to be answered).

This was a rapid introduction to the wacky world of a side who staged their previous press conference midway through the South Africa-Mexico game to keep it under the radar and who, having refused to meet their requirement to hold open training sessions, yesterday worked out in a public gym.

North Korea's attempts at subterfuge have also included someone's bright idea of nominating a forward, Kim Myong-won, in the third goalkeeping slot, prompting a distinctly unimpressed Fifa to insist that if he plays at all then it will be in goal. That little subplot unravelled further yesterday when Kim wore an outfield jersey as he warmed up. His coach, meanwhile, insisted: "Basically, he was a striker but he is very fast and for this World Cup he decided he wanted to be a goalkeeper again." Incredibly, this answer passed without a snigger.

All jokes aside, Amnesty International also pointed out yesterday that the republic is responsible for the systematic killing, torture and starvation of its citizens, who will not have the access to the game that the citizens of every other competing nation will enjoy. But for South Africa, attention will be on Kim's enigmatic side itself – ranked 105th in the world – 27 places behind the second lowest-ranked nation here, New Zealand. North Korea's mysteries are rendered all the deeper by the fact that two of the side's players have the same name. It is for the commentators to distinguish between Pak Nam-chol, the 24-year-old defensive midfielder, and Pak Nam-chol, the 21-year-old defender, whose numbers – 4 and 14 respectively – don't exactly help.

Considering very few of the squad play outside North Korea – midfielder An Yong-hak and striker Jong Tae-se ply their trade in Japan, where they were born and raised, while forward Hong Yong-jo plays in Russia – very little is known of a nation whose moment of fame was the defeat of Italy en route to the 1966 quarter-finals. Jong, inevitably entitled "the People's Rooney", is the one to watch after netting against Nigeria and twice against Greece recently.

Of course, that is painfully little to take into a game with Dunga's reconstructed Brazil. The entrance of the Selecao, who may need to use Tottenham's Heurelho Gomes in goal if Julio Cesar's back complaint has not cleared up, always brings a frisson of anticipation – though we should not expect the familiar samba rhythm to their football.

Dunga has come in for criticism for the gritty style he has introduced to the side. For his part, the manager has retreated behind the barricades, taking issue with what he has described as a media plot against him to boost newspaper circulations and TV ratings. Dunga's team look mentally and physically strong and quite clear tactically on what they want to achieve. The pragmatism will be praised if Brazil win. If they lose, there will be none of the affection felt for the valiant 1982 team. This is a tale of two managers under siege, then.



What to watch out for: Brazil's steel

Dunga has introduced steel where once there was silk, with tough midfielders such as Gilberto Silva, Josue and Felipe Melo. That's why there was no place in the squad for Ronaldinho, to huge controversy in Brazil. Tostao, a World Cup winner in 1970, has led a chorus of criticism for Dunga, whom he has accused of destroying youthful talent by ignoring such names as Neymar and Ganso.

PROMOTED VIDEO
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Caption competition
Caption competition
Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?

Bleacher Report

Daily Quiz
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

Career Services

Day In a Page

Isis in Iraq: Yazidi girls killing themselves to escape rape and imprisonment by militants

'Jilan killed herself in the bathroom. She cut her wrists and hanged herself'

Yazidi girls killing themselves to escape rape and imprisonment
Ed Balls interview: 'If I think about the deficit when I'm playing the piano, it all goes wrong'

Ed Balls interview

'If I think about the deficit when I'm playing the piano, it all goes wrong'
He's behind you, dude!

US stars in UK panto

From David Hasselhoff to Jerry Hall
Grace Dent's Christmas Quiz: What are you – a festive curmudgeon or top of the tree?

Grace Dent's Christmas Quiz

What are you – a festive curmudgeon or top of the tree?
Nasa planning to build cloud cities in airships above Venus

Nasa planning to build cloud cities in airships above Venus

Planet’s surface is inhospitable to humans but 30 miles above it is almost perfect
Surrounded by high-rise flats is a little house filled with Lebanon’s history - clocks, rifles, frogmen’s uniforms and colonial helmets

Clocks, rifles, swords, frogmen’s uniforms

Surrounded by high-rise flats is a little house filled with Lebanon’s history
Return to Gaza: Four months on, the wounds left by Israel's bombardment have not yet healed

Four months after the bombardment, Gaza’s wounds are yet to heal

Kim Sengupta is reunited with a man whose plight mirrors the suffering of the Palestinian people
Gastric surgery: Is it really the answer to the UK's obesity epidemic?

Is gastric surgery really the answer to the UK's obesity epidemic?

Critics argue that it’s crazy to operate on healthy people just to stop them eating
Homeless Veterans appeal: Christmas charity auction Part 2 - now LIVE

Homeless Veterans appeal: Christmas charity auction

Bid on original art, or trips of a lifetime to Africa or the 'Corrie' set, and help Homeless Veterans
Pantomime rings the changes to welcome autistic theatre-goers

Autism-friendly theatre

Pantomime leads the pack in quest to welcome all
The week Hollywood got scared and had to grow up a bit

The week Hollywood got scared and had to grow up a bit

Sony suffered a chorus of disapproval after it withdrew 'The Interview', but it's not too late for it to take a stand, says Joan Smith
From Widow Twankey to Mother Goose, how do the men who play panto dames get themselves ready for the performance of a lifetime?

Panto dames: before and after

From Widow Twankey to Mother Goose, how do the men who play panto dames get themselves ready for the performance of a lifetime?
Thirties murder mystery novel is surprise runaway Christmas hit

Thirties murder mystery novel is surprise runaway Christmas hit

Booksellers say readers are turning away from dark modern thrillers and back to the golden age of crime writing
Anne-Marie Huby: 'Charities deserve the best,' says founder of JustGiving

Anne-Marie Huby: 'Charities deserve the best'

Ten million of us have used the JustGiving website to donate to good causes. Its co-founder says that being dynamic is as important as being kind
The botanist who hunts for giant trees at Kew Gardens

The man who hunts giants

A Kew Gardens botanist has found 25 new large tree species - and he's sure there are more out there