Luis Suarez ban: Uruguayan fans swarm Montevideo airfield to give Suarez hero's welcome...except banned striker never arrives

Suarez was expected to fly back to Uruguay after he was banned for four months from all forms of football, except he is believed to have stayed in Brazil

Hundreds of Uruguay fans flooded the Montevideo airport on Thursday night – including President Jose Mujica – ready to cheer up Luis Suarez following his four-month worldwide ban that has ended his World Cup, but the striker was nowhere to be seen.

Suarez received the heaviest ban in World Cup history on Thursday after Fifa punished his bite on Italy’s Giorgio Chiellini with a four-month ban from all forms of football as well as a nine-match international ban and 100,000 Swiss franc fine.

The 27-year-old has been defended vehemently by many from his homeland, and they turned out in their masses to welcome him home after he was informed he can no longer train or stay with the rest of Uruguay’s World Cup squad.

Read more: Maradona supports Suarez
Suarez's grandmother: They've chucked him out like a dog
Fifa ban Suarez to end his World Cup dreams

With President Mujica also in attendance, news soon filtered through that Surez’s flight had been delayed, and he would spend the night in Natal in Brazil while the President made his way back home and the crowd dispersed to another adjacent air force base to await his arrival.

 

The Uruguayan Football Association has already confirmed that it will appeal the decision, after UAF President Wilmar Valdez said “it feels like Uruguay has been thrown out of the World Cup.”

Despite Valdez’s complaints that Suarez’s ban was both “excessive” and too sever considering the evidence, Fifa said that his actions could not be tolerated after he was found guilty of biting an opponent for the third time in his professional career.

“Such behaviour cannot be tolerated on any football pitch and in particular not at a Fifa World Cup, when the eyes of millions of people are on the stars on the field,” Claudio Sulser, chairman of the Fifa disciplinary committee, said in a statement released at Thursday’s morning briefing.

However, the feeling in Uruguay is unanimously in support of their national hero, and a lawmaker for Uruguay’s ruling Broad Front coalition blasted the “hypocrisy” of Fifa’s decision.

“The immorality and hypocrisy of Fifa has no limits. Neither does Chiellini's inclination for being a tattle-tale and a fink!” said Luis Puig, while another fan was reported by the Telegraph as saying: “They clearly wanted to kick Suarez out of the World Cup. Uruguay is a small country that eliminated two big nations like Italy and England and it doesn't benefit Fifa to let Uruguay continue playing.”

The general conception in the South American country is that there is a conspiracy against Suarez coming from England, Italy and Brazil, and rather than apologise for biting Chiellini, Suarez intends to fight the suspension.

He received more support from Argentinian legend Diego Maradona, who told Venezuela's Telesur network: “This is football, this is incidental contact. They have no common sense or a fan's sensibility. Luisito, we are with you.”

Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Caption competition
Caption competition
  • Get to the point
Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?

Bleacher Report

Daily Quiz
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

Career Services

Day In a Page

Not even the 'putrid throat' could stop the Ross Poldark swoon-fest'

Not even the 'putrid throat' could stop the Ross Poldark swoon-fest'

How a costume drama became a Sunday night staple
Miliband promises no stamp duty for first-time buyers as he pushes Tories on housing

Miliband promises no stamp duty for first-time buyers

Labour leader pushes Tories on housing
Aviation history is littered with grand failures - from the the Bristol Brabazon to Concorde - but what went wrong with the SuperJumbo?

Aviation history is littered with grand failures

But what went wrong with the SuperJumbo?
Fear of Putin, Islamists and immigration is giving rise to a new generation of Soviet-style 'iron curtains' right across Europe

Fortress Europe?

Fear of Putin, Islamists and immigration is giving rise to a new generation of 'iron curtains'
Never mind what you're wearing, it's what you're reclining on

Never mind what you're wearing

It's what you're reclining on that matters
General Election 2015: Chuka Umunna on the benefits of immigration, humility – and his leader Ed Miliband

Chuka Umunna: A virus of racism runs through Ukip

The shadow business secretary on the benefits of immigration, humility – and his leader Ed Miliband
Yemen crisis: This exotic war will soon become Europe's problem

Yemen's exotic war will soon affect Europe

Terrorism and boatloads of desperate migrants will be the outcome of the Saudi air campaign, says Patrick Cockburn
Marginal Streets project aims to document voters in the run-up to the General Election

Marginal Streets project documents voters

Independent photographers Joseph Fox and Orlando Gili are uploading two portraits of constituents to their website for each day of the campaign
Game of Thrones: Visit the real-life kingdom of Westeros to see where violent history ends and telly tourism begins

The real-life kingdom of Westeros

Is there something a little uncomfortable about Game of Thrones shooting in Northern Ireland?
How to survive a social-media mauling, by the tough women of Twitter

How to survive a Twitter mauling

Mary Beard, Caroline Criado-Perez, Louise Mensch, Bunny La Roche and Courtney Barrasford reveal how to trounce the trolls
Gallipoli centenary: At dawn, the young remember the young who perished in one of the First World War's bloodiest battles

At dawn, the young remember the young

A century ago, soldiers of the Empire – many no more than boys – spilt on to Gallipoli’s beaches. On this 100th Anzac Day, there are personal, poetic tributes to their sacrifice
Dissent is slowly building against the billions spent on presidential campaigns – even among politicians themselves

Follow the money as never before

Dissent is slowly building against the billions spent on presidential campaigns – even among politicians themselves, reports Rupert Cornwell
Samuel West interview: The actor and director on austerity, unionisation, and not mentioning his famous parents

Samuel West interview

The actor and director on austerity, unionisation, and not mentioning his famous parents
General Election 2015: Imagine if the leading political parties were fashion labels

Imagine if the leading political parties were fashion labels

Fashion editor, Alexander Fury, on what the leaders' appearances tell us about them
Phumzile Mlambo-Ngcuka: Home can be the unsafest place for women

Phumzile Mlambo-Ngcuka: Home can be the unsafest place for women

The architect of the HeForShe movement and head of UN Women on the world's failure to combat domestic violence