Luis Suarez latest: Fifa rejects appeal for Uruguay and Liverpool striker's bite on Giorgio Chiellini

World governing body reject Uruguayan football federation's appeal to reduce the ban

Football's world governing body Fifa has rejected an appeal from the Uruguayan football federation to reduce the ban Luis Suarez received for biting Italy defender Giorgio Chiellini.

The Liverpool striker was banned for nine international matches and for four months from "all football activity", as well as receiving fine of 100,000 Swiss francs (£66,000), for the incident which took place in the final match of World Cup Group D.

"The Fifa appeal committee has decided to reject the appeals lodged by both the Uruguayan player Luis Suarez and the Uruguayan FA, and to confirm the decision rendered by the Fifa disciplinary committee on June 25 2014 in its entirety," said Fifa head of media Delia Fischer at a news conference in Rio de Janeiro.

"The terms of the decision taken by the Fifa appeal committee were communicated to the player and the Uruguayan FA today."

Both the player and the federation can make a further appeal to the Court of Arbitration for Sport.

Fischer added: "The relevant decision is not yet final and binding, i.e. an appeal to the Court of Arbitration of Sport is still possible by the player and/or the Uruguayan FA, subject to certain conditions."

The disciplinary committee's initial decision took into account there had been no remorse from Suarez, and the fact it was the third time he had been involved in biting an opponent.

Suarez, who scored 30 goals for Liverpool as they mounted an unlikely Premier League title bid, is being linked with a blockbuster move to Barcelona this summer.

Fifa last month confirmed that should a transfer go through the 27-year-old would be allowed to complete a medical at the Nou Camp, but would not be allowed to train under the conditions of his four-month exile.

Suarez could be out of football until the end of October.

When the incident was first being investigated, Suarez offered a laughable defence to the Fifa Disciplinary Committee, saying: "I lost my balance... falling on top of my opponent... I hit my face against him, leaving a small bruise on my cheek and a strong pain in my teeth."

He was found guilty and sent home from the World Cup in disgrace, but later admitted to biting the defender and apologised to Chiellini.

"The truth is that my colleague Giorgio Chiellini suffered the physical result of a bite in the collision he suffered with me... I apologise to Giorgio Chiellini and the entire football family.

"I vow to the public that there will never be another incident like this."

Chiellini took to Twitter to respond to Suarez, posting: "It's all forgotten. I hope FIFA will reduce your suspension."

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