Luiz Felipe Scolari resigns: Brazil manager stands down after World Cup humiliation

The former Chelsea manager guided Brazil to the trophy in 2002

Luiz Felipe Scolari has resigned as manager of Brazil, the national football federation has announced.

The 65-year-old stood down as the World Cup hosts could only finish fourth, having been thrashed in their semi-final 7-1 by Germany, who went on to lift the trophy in Rio with victory over Argentina, and then beaten 3-0 by Holland on Saturday.

The decision was formally announced on Monday night on the Brazilian Football Confederation website, www.cbf.com.br, following a meeting between Scolari and president Jose Maria Marin, who is scheduled to step down next year in favour of Marco Polo Del Nero.

Only last week Del Nero had given Scolari, who guided Brazil to their fifth World Cup success in 2002, his full backing following the humiliating defeat in Belo Horizonte, which the one-time Chelsea boss described as the "worst day" of his life.

However, it now appears all parties have agreed a fresh approach is needed to rebuild Brazilian football, with Scolari's current contract, which expired at the end of the World Cup, not to be renewed.

 

A statement from the CBF read: "Coach Luiz Felipe Scolari and his fellow coaching staff surrendered their positions to the board of the Brazilian Football Confederation. The resignation was accepted by president Marin, who was keen to thank all the coaches and players and, by extension, the Brazilian fans for their support throughout the World Cup campaign.

Read more: Germany claim dramatic World Cup victory
Brazil 0 Netherlands 3 match report
This arrogant Brazil side may never be forgotten

"Scolari and his entire coaching staff deserve our respect and gratitude. They were responsible for returning to the Brazilian people your love for the team, despite not having achieved our greatest goal."

The statement added that Scolari had restored pride to the Brazilian flag and that Marin would give a media conference to expand further.

The 2014 World Cup was the first time in some 39 years Brazil had tasted defeat in a competitive fixture at home, having lifted the Confederations Cup 12 months ago.

The loss of star man Neymar through a back injury in the quarter-final win over Colombia proved key, as Brazil were unable to lift themselves without their talisman, and also suspended captain Thiago Silva, as Germany raced 5-0 ahead inside 30 disastrous minutes at the Estadio Mineirao.

Scolari became the subject of the Brazil fans' frustrations during the Holland game in Brasilia, when his picture on the big screen was met by loud jeers.

There had been so much optimism earlier in the tournament when Brazil had qualified for the knock-out stages top of their group, with two wins from the opening three matches.

However, they needed a nerve-shredding penalty shoot-out to edge past Chile into the quarter-finals.

The hosts had looked more composed as they saw off Colombia 2-1 in Fortaleza, only to then completely fall apart against the rampant Germans and fail to redeem themselves when beaten by the Dutch.

What lies ahead for Scolari is now unclear, the former Portugal manager having also been in charge at Bunyodkor of Uzbekistan and Brazilian club Palmeiras before returning to take over the national team two years ago.

Scolari, however, knows how history will now view him.

"I will be remembered as the coach to lose 7-1, but I knew that risk when I took the job," he said last week.

"The person who decided the line-up, the tactics, was me. It was my choice."

Brazil, meanwhile, will take their time before appointing a permanent successor, with under-23 coach Alexandre Gallo reportedly likely to be the interim caretaker.

Among those expected to be in contention for the full-time job include former Corinthians boss Tite and Muricy Ramalho of Sao Paulo as well as former Brazil boss Vanderlei Luxemburgo.

Brazil have never appointed a foreign coach, although Spaniard Pep Guardiola was linked with the position before he took charge at Bayern Munich.

PA

Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Caption competition
Caption competition
Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?

Bleacher Report

Daily Quiz
SPONSORED FEATURES
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

Career Services

Day In a Page

Turkey-Kurdish conflict: Obama's deal with Ankara is a betrayal of Syrian Kurds and may not even weaken Isis

US betrayal of old ally brings limited reward

Since the accord, the Turks have only waged war on Kurds while no US bomber has used Incirlik airbase, says Patrick Cockburn
VIPs gather for opening of second Suez Canal - but doubts linger over security

'A gift from Egypt to the rest of the world'

VIPs gather for opening of second Suez Canal - but is it really needed?
Jeremy Corbyn dresses abysmally. That's a great thing because it's genuine

Jeremy Corbyn dresses abysmally. That's a great thing because it's genuine

Fashion editor, Alexander Fury, applauds a man who clearly has more important things on his mind
The male menopause and intimations of mortality

Aches, pains and an inkling of mortality

So the male menopause is real, they say, but what would the Victorians, 'old' at 30, think of that, asks DJ Taylor
Man Booker Prize 2015: Anna Smaill - How can I possibly be on the list with these writers I have idolised?

'How can I possibly be on the list with these writers I have idolised?'

Man Booker Prize nominee Anna Smaill on the rise of Kiwi lit
Bettany Hughes interview: The historian on how Socrates would have solved Greece's problems

Bettany Hughes interview

The historian on how Socrates would have solved Greece's problems
Art of the state: Pyongyang propaganda posters to be exhibited in China

Art of the state

Pyongyang propaganda posters to be exhibited in China
Mildreds and Vanilla Black have given vegetarian food a makeover in new cookbooks

Vegetarian food gets a makeover

Long-time vegetarian Holly Williams tries to recreate some of the inventive recipes in Mildreds and Vanilla Black's new cookbooks
The haunting of Shirley Jackson: Was the gothic author's life really as bleak as her fiction?

The haunting of Shirley Jackson

Was the gothic author's life really as bleak as her fiction?
Bill Granger recipes: Heading off on holiday? Try out our chef's seaside-inspired dishes...

Bill Granger's seaside-inspired recipes

These dishes are so easy to make, our chef is almost embarrassed to call them recipes
Ashes 2015: Tourists are limp, leaderless and distinctly UnAustralian

Tourists are limp, leaderless and distinctly UnAustralian

A woefully out-of-form Michael Clarke embodies his team's fragile Ashes campaign, says Michael Calvin
Blairites be warned, this could be the moment Labour turns into Syriza

Andrew Grice: Inside Westminster

Blairites be warned, this could be the moment Labour turns into Syriza
HMS Victory: The mystery of Britain's worst naval disaster is finally solved - 271 years later

The mystery of Britain's worst naval disaster is finally solved - 271 years later

Exclusive: David Keys reveals the research that finally explains why HMS Victory went down with the loss of 1,100 lives
Survivors of the Nagasaki atomic bomb attack: Japan must not abandon its post-war pacifism

'I saw people so injured you couldn't tell if they were dead or alive'

Nagasaki survivors on why Japan must not abandon its post-war pacifism
Jon Stewart: The voice of Democrats who felt Obama had failed to deliver on his 'Yes We Can' slogan, and the voter he tried hardest to keep onside

The voter Obama tried hardest to keep onside

Outgoing The Daily Show host, Jon Stewart, became the voice of Democrats who felt the President had failed to deliver on his ‘Yes We Can’ slogan. Tim Walker charts the ups and downs of their 10-year relationship on screen