Bernstein quashes Capello speculation

 

The lead speaker at the Leaders in Football Conference at Stamford Bridge yesterday was David Bernstein, the chairman of the Football Association, who addressed an number of issues:

Bernstein on Capello

Reports yesterday suggested some FA powerbrokers were of the view that should England prosper at Euro 2012, reaching the semi-finals or beyond, Fabio Capello should be kept on for the 2014 World Cup. Bernstein said this would not happen. “The position is very clear. He is our manager until the end of the European Championships. That is it.” Bernstein added there had been no discussion over a replacement. “It is not something on our agenda at the moment. We are completely behind Fabio. You cannot be half-pregnant with these things.”

Bernstein on the FA

Bernstein admitted the FA had mishandled “the big issues that matter to the public.” He explained: We have had too many changes of chairman and chief executive; the national team has been generally disappointing, especially at last summer's World Cup; and we had a very disappointing World Cup bid.”

Looking ahead he said he believed in the value of independent input [a reference to the impending appointment of independent non-executive directors to the FA Board]; in clear accountability and transparency; and in increased diversity in senior positions.”

He said this to an audience which was overwhelming, more than 90 per cent, male and white. “I would love to have a woman on the FA Board, it is finding the right woman,” he added. This diversity extended to promoting more ex-footballers, like Trevor Brooking and gareth Southgate who work in the technical development area, to FA positions. Maybe it is a cultural issue but we have no [Uefa president Michel] Platini, no [Bayern Munich CEO and European Club Association acting chairman Karl-Heinz] Rummenigge,” said Bernstein.

Bernstein on the FA Cup

Bernstein said it was important to maintain the fundamental features so fixtures like Exeter City v Manchester United could occur. He said “Some Mickey Mouse ideas would reduce the competition's credibility,” which may be a reference to the prospect of seeding, regional rounds and midweek rounds.

Bernstein on Wembley

Wembley is now making an £40-50m operating profit and it would be breaking even in 2014-15 even after debt payments and depreciation was taken into account. Then it could start 'subsidising the game' rather than the other way around. This could be of considerable given he noted that “cuts in the provision of sports facilities by local authorities meant tough challenges”.

Bernstein on Fifa

Bernstein revealed that Uefa had held an emergency meeting before he made his speech at the Fifa Congress in June in which he castigated the world governing bodies governance, and asked him not to make the speech. He made it and did not regret doing so “It was a transparent and honest opinion clearly stated. I believe we are more respected because of it.” Julio Grondona, the Fifa vice-president and head of the Argentine FA, promptly took to the stage to decry the English as 'pirates and liars'. Bernstein revealed Grondona has since written to the FA to apologise for “his unacceptable comments.”

Fifa are holding an Executive committee meeting later this month to discuss reform but Bernstein said of the prospect of real change “don't hold your breath”. He revealed a recent Uefa meeting in Cyprus expressed “their disappointment at the lack of progress.”

Bernstein on Uefa

Michel Platini, the Uefa president, was “not anti-English but in many ways was pro-English ,” said Bernstein. He added: “We can't be the world's policeman, it is vital we work with Uefa.

Bernstein on player release

For years England have fielded shadow teams at international age-group tournaments due to clubs refusing to release players. The recent U-20 World Cup in Colombia was an obvious example with players like Josh McEachran sitting on the bench at Chelsea when they could have been playing. Fifa have made it clear they are unhappy at the perceived snub. Bernstein, somewhat optimistically, said the way forward was through “dialogue, common sense and goodwill. I hope managers will embrace the benefits playing for England brings to their players.”

Bernstein on goalline technology

The FA chairman said: “I think we will get there but there is no enthusiasm in Uefa or Fifa for using technology for anything beyond goalline decisions. FA general secretary predicted it would arrive in 2013-14.

News
Bill Gates, founder of Microsoft and co-chair of the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation
businessUber, Snapchat and Facebook founders among those on the 2015 Forbes Billionaire List
News
news... and what your reaction to the creatures above says about you
News
Jihadi John
newsMonikers like 'Jihadi John' make the grim sound glamorous
News
music
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Caption competition
Caption competition
Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?

Bleacher Report

Daily Quiz
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

Day In a Page

The difference between America and Israel? There isn’t one

The difference between America and Israel? There isn’t one

Netanyahu knows he can get away with anything in America, says Robert Fisk
Families clubbing together to build their own affordable accommodation

Do It Yourself approach to securing a new house

Community land trusts marking a new trend for taking the initiative away from developers
Head of WWF UK: We didn’t send Cameron to the Arctic to see green ideas freeze

David Nussbaum: We didn’t send Cameron to the Arctic to see green ideas freeze

The head of WWF UK remains sanguine despite the Government’s failure to live up to its pledges on the environment
Author Kazuo Ishiguro on being inspired by shoot-outs and samurai

Author Kazuo Ishiguro on being inspired by shoot-outs and samurai

Set in a mythologised 5th-century Britain, ‘The Buried Giant’ is a strange beast
With money, corruption and drugs, this monk fears Buddhism in Thailand is a ‘poisoned fruit’

Money, corruption and drugs

The monk who fears Buddhism in Thailand is a ‘poisoned fruit’
America's first slavery museum established at Django Unchained plantation - 150 years after slavery outlawed

150 years after it was outlawed...

... America's first slavery museum is established in Louisiana
Kelly Clarkson: How I snubbed Simon Cowell and become a Grammy-winning superstar

Kelly Clarkson: How I snubbed Simon Cowell and become a Grammy-winning superstar

The first 'American Idol' winner on how she manages to remain her own woman – Jane Austen fascination and all
Tony Oursler on exploring our uneasy relationship with technology with his new show

You won't believe your eyes

Tony Oursler's new show explores our uneasy relationship with technology. He's one of a growing number of artists with that preoccupation
Ian Herbert: Peter Moores must go. He should never have been brought back to fail again

Moores must go. He should never have been brought back to fail again

The England coach leaves players to find solutions - which makes you wonder where he adds value, says Ian Herbert
War with Isis: Fears that the looming battle for Mosul will unleash 'a million refugees'

The battle for Mosul will unleash 'a million refugees'

Aid agencies prepare for vast exodus following planned Iraqi offensive against the Isis-held city, reports Patrick Cockburn
Yvette Cooper: We can't lose the election. There's too much on the line

Yvette Cooper: We can't lose the election. There's too much on the line

The shadow Home Secretary on fighting radical Islam, protecting children, and why anyone in Labour who's thinking beyond May must 'sort themselves out'
A bad week for the Greens: Leader Natalie Bennett's 'car crash' radio interview is followed by Brighton council's failure to set a budget due to infighting

It's not easy being Green

After a bad week in which its leader had a public meltdown and its only city council couldn't agree on a budget vote, what next for the alternative party? It's over to Caroline Lucas to find out
Gorillas nearly missed: BBC producers didn't want to broadcast Sir David Attenborough's famed Rwandan encounter

Gorillas nearly missed

BBC producers didn't want to broadcast Sir David Attenborough's famed Rwandan encounter
Downton Abbey effect sees impoverished Italian nobles inspired to open their doors to paying guests for up to €650 a night

The Downton Abbey effect

Impoverished Italian nobles are opening their doors to paying guests, inspired by the TV drama
China's wild panda numbers have increased by 17% since 2003, new census reveals

China's wild panda numbers on the up

New census reveals 17% since 2003