Children of Alfredo Di Stefano file injunction to stop Real Madrid legend marrying women 50 years his junior

The 86-year-old has said he wants to marry the Costa Rican woman

Real Madrid great Alfredo Di Stefano's five children have filed an injunction to prevent their 86-year-old father marrying a Costa Rican woman 50 years his junior.

One of the greatest players of all time, Argentina-born Di Stefano told El Mundo newspaper at the weekend he planned to wed 36-year-old Gina Gonzalez "because I want to and I have been a widower for eight years".

Di Stefano, now honorary Real president, acknowledged his children might be against the marriage and they have filed papers at a Madrid court to have him declared mentally and physically incapable.

They also want to protect his assets, according to a statement from the five children carried in local media.

"We believe his current state of vulnerability, together with his obvious media profile, could result in abusive conduct towards him," the statement said.

"It is precisely this that we intend to avert by means of the legal protection we are seeking, while at the same time trying to protect the image and honour, both of our father and, in general, of our family."

Di Stefano has had his share of health problems in recent years and is often seen in public in a wheelchair.

Known as "La Saeta Rubia" (the blond arrow), his achievements as a player helped turn Real, whom he joined in 1953, into one of the world's leading sides.

He transformed them from under-achievers into the kings of the continent when he guided them to five successive European Cups between 1956 and 1960, scoring in each of the finals.

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