FA to investigate agent over 'double payments'

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The Football Association is launching an investigation into the players' agent Dennis Roach amid alleged breaches of rules on "double" payments. It is believed that the inquest will scrutinise up to six high-profile transfers involving Roach and players he represents.

The Football Association is launching an investigation into the players' agent Dennis Roach amid alleged breaches of rules on "double" payments. It is believed that the inquest will scrutinise up to six high-profile transfers involving Roach and players he represents.

The recent transfers which saw Duncan Ferguson move from Newcastle United to Everton and Paulo Wanchope from West Ham to Manchester City are thought to particularly interest the FA. Previous moves involving Ferguson and Wanchope are among the other deals under examination.

If Roach is found guilty of breaking the rules regarding transfers he could lose his Fifa licence, which could cost him around £100,000, and face a ban.

Roach was criticised by both Newcastle and Manchester City for the payments he sought during negotiations for the deals involving Ferguson and Wanchope.

Now Roach has been the subject of a complaint, believed to have come from Newcastle, about his financial demands and the possibility that he has been paid by both the Magpies and Everton.

The Rotherham United manager, Ronnie Moore, is reporting his Cardiff City counterpart, Bobby Gould, to the League Managers' Association over the transfer of Leo Fortune-West between the clubs.

The striker joined Cardiff for £300,000 yesterday, but Moore is unhappy about the way that Gould finalised the deal.

The Aston Villa manager, John Gregory, has avoided an FA disciplinary charge following his outburst against Chelsea earlier this week. Gregory claimed the Blues were "fake pretenders with false illusions" and accused them of "tapping up" the Villa captain Gareth Southgate.

However, having analysed Gregory's accusations, the FA has decided to not to take action, although it is thought it will send him a written warning over his future conduct.

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