Jack Warner will not meet Fifa investigators

Suspended Fifa vice-president Jack Warner says he has no plans to meet investigators probing bribery allegations.

Fifa have agreed to move the venue of the interviews with those Caribbean Football Union (CFU) members who refused to travel to Miami but Warner will not be among those quizzed by investigators.



Warner, alleged along with fellow Fifa member Mohamed Bin Hammam to have paid bribes totalling 1 million US dollars to Caribbean associations, told Press Association Sport: "I have not received any summons asking me to speak with them [the investigators] nor do I plan to do so."



Up to 18 of the 25 CFU associations alleged to have been paid or offered bribes of 40,000 US dollars each refused Fifa's call to go to Miami to provide evidence. They also called for Fifa to replace ex-FBI director Louis Freeh as lead investigator.



A CFU source said however that Fifa had agreed to a new venue for the interviews and that they were prepared to co-operate with any "independent and unbiased" investigation.



The CFU suggested Barbados and Trinidad as options for a different venue to Miami but it is believed Fifa will choose an island elsewhere in the Caribbean.



Warner and Bin Hammam have been suspended pending the investigation into allegations they paid bribes at a meeting of CFU officials in Trinidad on May 10 and 11. They deny any wrongdoing.



Meanwhile the president of the Barbados Football Association, Ronald Jones, has insisted he nor his officials were offered any bribes by Bin Hamman or Warner.







Barbados FA president Jones said in a statement: "None of our delegates were offered any inducements or gifts to support any of the candidates during the meeting on May 10.



"Our delegates listened to the speeches by Mohamed Bin Hamman, who was there to make a case as to why he would need the support of Fifa members of the CFU.



"The Barbados Football Association was made aware that the trip and accommodation were sponsored by Mohamed Bin Hamman under the auspices of the CFU. The BFA did not and does not see this as akin to bribery or any inducements as in the past trips by Caribbean delegates to meetings have been sponsored by the organisation and agency that wanted to put on the programme."

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