Joey Barton, the thinking man's footballer

Click to follow
The Independent Online

First he turned to George Orwell, then George Washington. But Barton is not alone in revealing the link between philosophy and the beautiful game. Nick Szczepanik discovers a cornucopia of thought for him to tweet.

Double think means the power of holding two contradictory beliefs in one's mind simultaneously, and accepting both of them

George Orwell on Graham Taylor's Five Live commentaries

Three o'clock is always too late or too early for anything you want to do

Jean-Paul Sartre reflects on the powerlessness of the managers once the lads cross the white line

Dignity does not consist in possessing honours, but in deserving them

Aristotle on opponents diving to win late penalties

A single sentence will suffice for modern man: he fornicated and read the papers

Albert Camus on Ryan Giggs

Nothing is so difficult as not deceiving oneself Ludwig Wittgenstein questions

Arsene Wenger’s belief in his young players

I do everything I think possible or acceptable to escape from this trap

Jacques Derrida anticipates wantaway striker Carlos Tevez’s struggles at Man City

All wealth is the product of labour

John Locke explains why he still wants bags of running in midfield

Observation is always selective

Karl Popper on Arsene Wenger’s press conferences

Those who do not remember the mistakes of the past are condemned to relive it

George Santayana works on defending set plays in training

Absolute silence leads to sadness. It is the image of death

Jean Jacques Rousseau at the DW Stadium

God is always on the side of the big battalions

Voltaire is philosophical about another late penalty awarded to Manchester United at Old Trafford

The superfluous is a very necessary thing

Voltaire on the Baby Bentley culture

Like dreams, statistics are a form of wish fulfilment

Jean Baudrillard is not a fan of Sky Sports’ football coverage

All things excellent are as difficult as they are rare

Baruch Spinoza believes in those hours of practice on the training ground

Whereof one cannot speak, therof one must remain silent

Ludwig Wittgenstien on superinjunctions in the bad old days before Twitter

The perpetual struggle for room and food

TR Malthus remembers the queue for pies in the old main stand at Derby County

Whoever is winning at the moment will always seem to be invincible

George Orwell on the Premier League leaders

Four legs good, two legs bad

George Orwell on why it never pays to play the lone striker system

I wonder if we could conjure some magnificent myth that would in itself carry conviction to our whole community

Plato anticipates the formation of the Premier League

Comments