Louis van Gaal: Why the Netherlands manager can get more out of Robin van Persie at Manchester United than David Moyes could

The Dutchman, who will be available after this summer's World Cup, is the leading candidate to replace David Moyes at Old Trafford

Following the dismissal of David Moyes, Louis van Gaal has quickly emerged as the leading candidate to replace him at Manchester United.

David Moyes sacked by Manchester United

Should the Old Trafford hierarchy make the Dutchman the new chosen one, one particular Manchester United player will be pleased with the appointment - Robin van Persie.

The Manchester United striker has endured a quiet season by his own standards, netting 11 goals in the Premier League. The current campaign is in stark contrast to his first one at Old Trafford under Sir Alex Ferguson in which he scored 26 goals in the league.

Read more: Giggs named Manchester United interim manager
Gary Neville: I don't like how Moyes was sacked
How Moyes paid for failure in the transfer window

His lack of form and the return of the injury problems that blighted his time at Arsenal led to questions over his relationship with Moyes. There were suggestions that Moyes' training methods were incompatible with van Persie, while the Dutchman also publicly criticised his team-mates after a Champions League defeat to Olympiakos.

 

Van Gaal, van Persie's manager with the Netherlands, also questioned the striker's role at Manchester United since the arrival of Moyes.

"The football from Man United now is, for him, maybe difficult but then he wishes to show his technique. Technique [levels] in the Dutch team [are] higher," said Van Gaal.

Robin van Persie with David Moyes Robin van Persie with David Moyes  

Read more: United cannot afford to appoint the wrong man again
Watching the demise of Moyes became unpleasant to watch
The role of Twitter in sacking Moyes

With talk of unrest behind the scenes, van Persie was moved to clarify his position, claiming he wanted to finish his career at Old Trafford. Despite those claims, questions over their relationship have remained.

Former Nottingham Forest player and Dutch international Pierre van Hooijdonk was recently asked about the impact van Gaal could have on the future of van Persie if they were paired at Old Trafford.

“Let me tell you one thing: if Van Gaal becomes manager of Manchester United, Van Persie will stay," said Hooijdonk.

“Louis will bring in a number of top players and he will create a whole new team for United – which, we can see, is necessary.”

David Moyes greets the goalscorer Robin van Persie at the end of the game David Moyes greets RVP  

Read more: United do sack managers - Ferguson bucked a trend
Who will be the next United manager?
Klopp rules himself out of the running for United role

Van Gaal certainly appears to know how to get the best out of van Persie on the international stage. This season the Manchester United striker scored six goals in four World Cup qualifiers. While van Persie has been quiet at Old Trafford this season, he is still expected to shine in Brazil.

"I think he should be great in the tournament because he loves to play in the Dutch squad," van Gaal said.

If van Gaal succeeds Moyes, van Persie might just begin to love playing for Manchester United again too.

Suggested Topics
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Caption competition
Caption competition
Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?

Bleacher Report

Daily Quiz
SPONSORED FEATURES
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

Day In a Page

A groundbreaking study of 'Britain's Atlantis' long buried at the bottom of the North Sea could revolutionise how we see our prehistoric past

Britain's Atlantis

Scientific study beneath North Sea could revolutionise how we see the past
The Queen has 'done and said nothing that anybody will remember,' says Starkey

The Queen has 'done and said nothing that anybody will remember'

David Starkey's assessment
Oliver Sacks said his life has been 'an enormous privilege and adventure'

'An enormous privilege and adventure'

Oliver Sacks writing about his life
'Gibraltar is British, and it is going to stay British forever'

'Gibraltar is British, and it is going to stay British forever'

The Rock's Chief Minister hits back at Spanish government's 'lies'
Britain is still addicted to 'dirty coal'

Britain still addicted to 'dirty' coal

Biggest energy suppliers are more dependent on fossil fuel than a decade ago
Orthorexia nervosa: How becoming obsessed with healthy eating can lead to malnutrition

Orthorexia nervosa

How becoming obsessed with healthy eating can lead to malnutrition
Lady Chatterley is not obscene, says TV director

Lady Chatterley’s Lover

Director Jed Mercurio on why DH Lawrence's novel 'is not an obscene story'
Farmers in tropical forests are training ants to kill off bigger pests

Set a pest to catch a pest

Farmers in tropical forests are training ants to kill off bigger pests
Mexico: A culture that celebrates darkness as an essential part of life

The dark side of Mexico

A culture that celebrates darkness as an essential part of life
Being sexually assaulted was not your fault, Chrissie Hynde. Don't tell other victims it was theirs

Being sexually assaulted was not your fault, Chrissie Hynde

Please don't tell other victims it was theirs
A nap a day could save your life - and here's why

A nap a day could save your life

A midday nap is 'associated with reduced blood pressure'
If men are so obsessed by sex, why do they clam up when confronted with the grisly realities?

If men are so obsessed by sex...

...why do they clam up when confronted with the grisly realities?
The comedy titans of Avalon on their attempt to save BBC3

Jon Thoday and Richard Allen-Turner

The comedy titans of Avalon on their attempt to save BBC3
The bathing machine is back... but with a difference

Rolling in the deep

The bathing machine is back but with a difference
Part-privatised tests, new age limits, driverless cars: Tories plot motoring revolution

Conservatives plot a motoring revolution

Draft report reveals biggest reform to regulations since driving test introduced in 1935