No plans to ban vuvuzelas in England

Clubs in the Barclays Premier League have no immediate plans to ban the use of vuvuzelas next season.

German Bundesliga giants Borussia Dortmund today became the first European club to declare a ban on fans taking the South African instrument into their ground next season.



Vuvuzelas have taken the World Cup by storm but the constant droning noise has divided opinion.



The Barclays Premier League have already stated it is a matter for individual clubs and on the day next season's fixtures were unveiled, most of the teams in the top flight admitted they had no plans to outlaw the horns.



A spokesman for Arsenal said: "There is no ban on the use of vuvuzelas within Emirates Stadium at present, as they do not contravene our ground regulations.



"However, the enjoyment and safety of fans on a matchday is of paramount importance to us, and we reserve the right to take action against any device which negatively impacts the experience of others within Emirates Stadium."



Birmingham City were also mindful of the matchday experience being spoiled by the vuvuzelas and said that, ultimately, it would be a matter for the local authority and the safety group.



A spokesman said: "On the subject of any kind of matchday entertainment we always take our supporters' opinions into account but ultimately this matter would be decided by the local authority and safety advisory group."



A spokesperson for double-winners Chelsea added: "We have no plans to ban them at the moment."



Tottenham, who qualified for the Champions League last season by finishing fourth, are currently liaising with safety and licensing authorities over the issue.



"There is currently no policy relating to the use of vuvuzelas within stadia in the UK as this has not been considered an issue to date," said a club spokesman. "We are therefore currently liaising with all relevant safety and licensing personnel."



While England's clubs adopt a wait and see policy, the horns have already been banned from the majority of public events in Germany due to apparent health risks related to the droning sound they produce, and Dortmund today became the first Bundesliga club to officially outlaw them.



"Our fans don't want to have these trumpets," said Dortmund's general manager Hans-Joachim Watzke. "It is nerve-racking and completely drowns out any chanting."



The Westfalenstadion is the largest arena in Germany with a capacity of over 81,000 and is generally regarded as boasting the best atmosphere in the Bundesliga.



And Watzke confirmed the law against their use in the stadium would be firmly enforced in a bid to maintain the venue's reputation.



"We have decided as a work group at Borussia Dortmund that these horrid things will be forbidden from the Westfalenstadion," he said.



"Anybody who does not abide by this will face the consequences."



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