Alan Pardew head-butt: Newcastle United owner Mike Ashley shows he now trusts his manager

Mad moment will not cost Pardew his job as he sings from owner’s hymn sheet

“We do not have Qatar money. We do not have that sort of finance, so it is a slow build, keep getting better, keep getting stronger. Hopefully our fans realise that.” This was the most significant moment in the relationship of Newcastle United’s owner Mike Ashley and manager Alan Pardew over the weekend. Not the powder-keg explosion when Pardew reacted to the antagonism of the former Sunderland player David Meyler.

On Saturday evening, there were suggestions that Pardew was set for the sack, but they were not coming from inside St James’ Park. Pardew is getting it right. Saturday was a moment of stupidity – one that has context.

Had he had his moment of madness in the shadow of last summer, he would have lost his job. Then, his standing with Ashley was low. He had chased Europa League success and risked the Premier League status of the club. Joe Kinnear, of all people, was parachuted in as a director of football. He was there to keep an eye on Pardew, to weaken him, to offer an alternative – certainly at first – if the manager became so riled by his initial undermining that he walked. There was big money at stake, compensation complications that go with a long-term contract.

Ashley and Pardew both kept their nerve. Neither man buckled. Pardew, little by little, has got back on track. He has remembered the club mantras about caution not chaos, about dancing to the owner’s tune, and not that of the supporters.

That is not easy on Tyneside. Newcastle is a one-club city where the club dominates all thought. Living among it and staying detached is difficult, as Derek Llambias, the managing director who resigned after Kinnear’s appointment, found. Following Ashley’s masterplan is easier without feeling at close quarters the relentless hunger of the club’s fans.

Newcastle released their accounts last Tuesday. There was no fanfare. A £9.9m profit was recorded. The best player, Yohan Cabaye, had been sold. Player spending was not huge. Pardew had to ride out a nine-game run which yielded one win (following one of seven wins from nine) amid losing his captain. He had to bite his tongue, and this time he did.

“The finances of the club are in good shape,” he said on Friday. “As I have said before, we know we have to do some work in the summer after losing Cabaye and we would like to think we will have to spend some of that in the summer. The board has done well to get those figures and we look forward to the next period of, hopefully, our growth.”

 

Pardew would like to kick on and chase the Champions League. But he has learned. This is Ashley’s club and this will be done the Ashley way. Breaking from the plan is not advisable.

Kinnear didn’t get it right and has gone. Pardew must tread a cautious path, and it has arguably taken three years for him to get there.

Whatever happened in the fierce adrenalin-fuelled seconds of that explosion in the 72nd minute of Saturday’s clash at the KC Stadium was to the detriment of Pardew’s career. He will never be allowed to forget it.

The intensity of that action – and the first push was by Meyler – was that of a man who was a glazier playing non-league football for Whyteleafe and Epsom & Ewell until he was 22. Pardew did not become a League player with Crystal Palace until he was 26. That sharpens desire. If he cherishes what he has, it is because he has not always had it. He had to fight to make it as a player, and he has had to fight to make it as a manager.

He was booted out by West Ham, Charlton and Southampton before Ashley took a characteristic gamble in December 2010. Pardew has been putting out fires ever since, fighting his corner.

He had to take on a powerful dressing room that included Kevin Nolan, Joey Barton and Alan Smith when he succeeded the popular Chris Hughton. He achieved it. There was a ticking time-bomb when the owner sold Andy Carroll after Pardew had said he would stay. The ground was renamed, for two transfer windows the club has remained idle, making only two loan signings. He has asked for more British-based players to be signed.

The owner takes his advice in the transfer market from the chief scout, Graham Carr. The pressure on the manager of Newcastle United is unique. Ask Kenny Dalglish, Graeme Souness or Ruud Gullit, who all failed. Into that melting-pot, which has fuelled Pardew to have vicious pitchside rows with Martin O’Neill and Manuel Pellegrini as well as a reckless push on linesman Peter Kirkup, stepped a former Sunderland player.

Do not under-estimate the North-east element to that clash in Hull. Sunderland had a cup final on Sunday. It has been a stick to smash Newcastle with ever since the dramatic penalty shoot-out victory at Manchester United. Meyler was a Sunderland player for five years. That is enough to be well schooled in the hatred that exists between the two clubs. It is enough to colour how you feel about Newcastle.

Meyler, in his haste to retrieve the ball, would never have dreamed of pushing Jose Mourinho or Arsène Wenger if they had been stood in the visiting technical area, as he did Pardew. From that point on Pardew loses any defence. To have pushed his head into the face of Meyler is something that will haunt his life, never mind his career.

But it was never enough to cost him his job, not to an owner who now has a manager singing from his hymn sheet.

It cost Pardew a £100,000 club fine and it will most likely cost him any chance of moving upward from St James’ Park when the unique pressure cooker of managing Newcastle United is finally turned off for him.

Suggested Topics
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Caption competition
Caption competition
Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?

Bleacher Report

Daily Quiz
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

Day In a Page

Sun, sex and an anthropological study: One British academic's summer of hell in Magaluf

Sun, sex and an anthropological study

One academic’s summer of hell in Magaluf
From Shakespeare to Rising Damp... to Vicious

Frances de la Tour's 50-year triumph

'Rising Damp' brought De la Tour such recognition that she could be forgiven if she'd never been able to move on. But at 70, she continues to flourish - and to beguile
'That Whitsun, I was late getting away...'

Ian McMillan on the Whitsun Weddings

This weekend is Whitsun, and while the festival may no longer resonate, Larkin's best-loved poem, lives on - along with the train journey at the heart of it
Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath in a new light

Songs from the bell jar

Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath
How one man's day in high heels showed him that Cannes must change its 'no flats' policy

One man's day in high heels

...showed him that Cannes must change its 'flats' policy
Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Dominic Rossi of Fidelity says his pressure on business to control rewards is working. But why aren’t other fund managers helping?
The King David Hotel gives precious work to Palestinians - unless peace talks are on

King David Hotel: Palestinians not included

The King David is special to Jerusalem. Nick Kochan checked in and discovered it has some special arrangements, too
More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years

End of the Aussie brain drain

More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years
Meditation is touted as a cure for mental instability but can it actually be bad for you?

Can meditation be bad for you?

Researching a mass murder, Dr Miguel Farias discovered that, far from bringing inner peace, meditation can leave devotees in pieces
Eurovision 2015: Australians will be cheering on their first-ever entrant this Saturday

Australia's first-ever Eurovision entrant

Australia, a nation of kitsch-worshippers, has always loved the Eurovision Song Contest. Maggie Alderson says it'll fit in fine
Letterman's final Late Show: Laughter, but no tears, as David takes his bow after 33 years

Laughter, but no tears, as Letterman takes his bow after 33 years

Veteran talkshow host steps down to plaudits from four presidents
Ivor Novello Awards 2015: Hozier wins with anti-Catholic song 'Take Me To Church' as John Whittingdale leads praise for Black Sabbath

Hozier's 'blasphemous' song takes Novello award

Singer joins Ed Sheeran and Clean Bandit in celebration of the best in British and Irish music
Tequila gold rush: The spirit has gone from a cheap shot to a multi-billion pound product

Join the tequila gold rush

The spirit has gone from a cheap shot to a multi-billion pound product
12 best statement wallpapers

12 best statement wallpapers

Make an impact and transform a room with a conversation-starting pattern
Paul Scholes column: Does David De Gea really want to leave Manchester United to fight it out for the No 1 spot at Real Madrid?

Paul Scholes column

Does David De Gea really want to leave Manchester United to fight it out for the No 1 spot at Real Madrid?