Arsenal 'can't compete' in the transfer market admits chairman Peter Hill-Wood

 

Arsenal chairman Peter Hill-Wood has admitted the club "can't compete"
in the transfer market with their Barclays Premier League top-four
rivals.

But Hill-Wood was confident the Gunners would mount a serious title challenge this season and insisted the board were not worried about Arsene Wenger's failure to win a trophy for seven years.

The Arsenal chairman also said he was "disgusted" by those fans who abused manager Wenger last season as the club once again came up short.

Hill-Wood told the Evening Standard: "Arsene has money to spend but there's a limit. We can't spend £50million on one player.

"At a certain level, we can't compete. I don't think [majority shareholder] Stan Kroenke is going to put the sort of dollars in that [Roman] Abramovich or Sheikh Mansour are putting into Chelsea or Manchester City. That's not the way he thinks clubs should be run.

"Luckily, Arsene understands that. He got an economics degree from Strasbourg University so he's certainly no fool. He knows how a club should be run. That annoys a lot of people but clubs have to be sustainable. We're not going to go bankrupt in the way one or two other well-known clubs have.

"The Glasgow Rangers example is something we've all got to guard against. They spent far more money than they could afford. We're ambitious enough but we're not going to end in the same plight as Rangers. That is a fact of life. So my advice is, don't get miserable about it."

Last season saw Wenger come under more pressure than ever since he took charge 16 years ago, with some fans even heard to chant: "You don't know what you're doing".

Hill-Wood said: "What those fans shouted did not influence me one little bit. I was disgusted to hear them because Arsene's been absolutely outstanding. He is still outstanding."

This summer saw captain Robin van Persie become the latest big name to quit the club because he did not believe their ambitions matched his own.

Hill-Wood said: "We have a pretty good chance of challenging for the Premiership. I don't see why we cannot win it this year."

Arsenal's decline has been traced back by some to the departure of David Dein as vice-chairman.

Hill-Wood dismissed this, as well as any prospect of Dein being invited to return.

He also said he remained opposed to the club's second largest shareholder, Alisher Usmanov, being handed a place on the board.

Meanwhile, full-back Carl Jenkinson has claimed Sunday's win at Liverpool proved Arsenal do "mean business" this season.

The Gunners drew their opening two league games 0-0 but got three points on the board at Anfield, as well as keeping another clean sheet.

Jenkinson told their official website, http://www.arsenal.com: "After the two results we had, they weren't ideal and like I said before the game, if we win at Anfield, it would be a big statement of intent.

"We've gone and done that and shown we mean business.

"Maybe people were questioning us after the first two games, but we knew in ourselves that the goals would come and we've come to Anfield, which is no easy place to pick up three points, and we've won 2-0."

Arsenal's new-found defensive resilience has been credited to former defender Steve Bould, who was promoted to assistant manager during the summer.

Jenkinson said: "Steve has come in and he's been there and done it.

"He's always there giving us advice and tips, and we've had a long pre-season to work together and get our shape right.

"A lot of credit goes to the midfield, too.

"You need that shield in front of the back four and I think we're doing that fantastically at the moment and it's showing in our results."

PA

Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Caption competition
Caption competition
Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?

Bleacher Report

Daily Quiz
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

Day In a Page

Sun, sex and an anthropological study: One British academic's summer of hell in Magaluf

Sun, sex and an anthropological study

One academic’s summer of hell in Magaluf
From Shakespeare to Rising Damp... to Vicious

Frances de la Tour's 50-year triumph

'Rising Damp' brought De la Tour such recognition that she could be forgiven if she'd never been able to move on. But at 70, she continues to flourish - and to beguile
'That Whitsun, I was late getting away...'

Ian McMillan on the Whitsun Weddings

This weekend is Whitsun, and while the festival may no longer resonate, Larkin's best-loved poem, lives on - along with the train journey at the heart of it
Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath in a new light

Songs from the bell jar

Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath
How one man's day in high heels showed him that Cannes must change its 'no flats' policy

One man's day in high heels

...showed him that Cannes must change its 'flats' policy
Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Dominic Rossi of Fidelity says his pressure on business to control rewards is working. But why aren’t other fund managers helping?
The King David Hotel gives precious work to Palestinians - unless peace talks are on

King David Hotel: Palestinians not included

The King David is special to Jerusalem. Nick Kochan checked in and discovered it has some special arrangements, too
More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years

End of the Aussie brain drain

More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years
Meditation is touted as a cure for mental instability but can it actually be bad for you?

Can meditation be bad for you?

Researching a mass murder, Dr Miguel Farias discovered that, far from bringing inner peace, meditation can leave devotees in pieces
Eurovision 2015: Australians will be cheering on their first-ever entrant this Saturday

Australia's first-ever Eurovision entrant

Australia, a nation of kitsch-worshippers, has always loved the Eurovision Song Contest. Maggie Alderson says it'll fit in fine
Letterman's final Late Show: Laughter, but no tears, as David takes his bow after 33 years

Laughter, but no tears, as Letterman takes his bow after 33 years

Veteran talkshow host steps down to plaudits from four presidents
Ivor Novello Awards 2015: Hozier wins with anti-Catholic song 'Take Me To Church' as John Whittingdale leads praise for Black Sabbath

Hozier's 'blasphemous' song takes Novello award

Singer joins Ed Sheeran and Clean Bandit in celebration of the best in British and Irish music
Tequila gold rush: The spirit has gone from a cheap shot to a multi-billion pound product

Join the tequila gold rush

The spirit has gone from a cheap shot to a multi-billion pound product
12 best statement wallpapers

12 best statement wallpapers

Make an impact and transform a room with a conversation-starting pattern
Paul Scholes column: Does David De Gea really want to leave Manchester United to fight it out for the No 1 spot at Real Madrid?

Paul Scholes column

Does David De Gea really want to leave Manchester United to fight it out for the No 1 spot at Real Madrid?