Brown tells Geovanni to control anger

Brazilian escapes fine for outburst but Hull manager threatens to drop playmaker

Hull manager Phil Brown has told Geovanni he must calm down or get used to the bench after revealing he opted not to fine the Brazilian for his angry outburst at the weekend.

The playmaker shook his head and stared aggressively at Brown after realising he was to be substituted during Sunday's 2-1 defeat to Premier League relegation rivals Blackburn, and appeared to continue with a furious rant after taking his seat on the bench.

Brown revealed his displeasure immediately after the game – even joking that he hoped Geovanni failed a post-match drugs test for which he had been singled out. As it turned out, the doping control gave the former Barcelona player a chance to regain his cool and then say sorry for his behaviour.

Brown welcomed Geovanni's contrition but has told his creative lynchpin that with the Tigers now very much in a fight for top-flight survival, there is no room in his team for hotheads.

"He was very apologetic for his actions," Brown said. "But as far as I was concerned his actions were those of an angry man, as opposed to a composed man, and that's what I'm looking for. I'm looking for players who go across the white line and compose themselves, and can respect the decision [to substitute him] for the reasons it was taken.

"It was taken for the right reasons. If I printed the stats it would be there for everybody to see. But I'm not going to wash dirty clothes in public."

Reports have suggested Geovanni was fined by Brown for his fit of pique, but the City manager denies that is the case and insists he will be considered for tonight's crucial trip to face Fulham at Craven Cottage.

"It's not written in his contract that if he storms off and gets the huff that you can fine him," Brown said. "I'm a big boy, but he won't be doing it to me again – that's for sure.

"But it's between me and Geo, it's in-house, it will remain in-house, and he's got an opportunity on Wednesday to do something about it."

The 29-year-old was taken off as part of a double substitution just eight minutes into the second half on Sunday, following a largely ineffectual display which was typical of his recent dip in form. Brown believes the Brazilian may be suffering from nerves as the season enters its most crucial phase, and cited a missed opportunity in the opening half when an uncharacteristically poor touch frittered away a dangerous position.

"Composure is absolutely key at the moment. Probably the best 'touch' player at the club had the best opportunity to score the opening goal. It was probably the heaviest touch I've seen him have since he came to this place," Brown said.

"But I know there's still a player in there who has something to offer between now and the end of the season but it has to come sooner rather than later." Brown's decision to haul off his star turn was greeted with derision from the home fans at KC Stadium. "Of course it hurts," he admitted. "But we're big boys and that's what we're in the game for, making big decisions. You've got to make them.

"Them venting their anger against me – I'll take that all day as long as they keep it away from the players."

Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Caption competition
Caption competition
Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?

Bleacher Report

Daily Quiz
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

Day In a Page

Abuse - and the hell that came afterwards

Abuse - and the hell that follows

James Rhodes on the extraordinary legal battle to publish his memoir
Why we need a 'tranquility map' of England, according to campaigners

It's oh so quiet!

The case for a 'tranquility map' of England
'Timeless fashion': It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it

'Timeless fashion'

It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it
If the West needs a bridge to the 'moderates' inside Isis, maybe we could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive after all

Could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive?

Robert Fisk on the Fountainheads of World Evil in 2011 - and 2015
New exhibition celebrates the evolution of swimwear

Evolution of swimwear

From bathing dresses in the twenties to modern bikinis
Sun, sex and an anthropological study: One British academic's summer of hell in Magaluf

Sun, sex and an anthropological study

One academic’s summer of hell in Magaluf
From Shakespeare to Rising Damp... to Vicious

Frances de la Tour's 50-year triumph

'Rising Damp' brought De la Tour such recognition that she could be forgiven if she'd never been able to move on. But at 70, she continues to flourish - and to beguile
'That Whitsun, I was late getting away...'

Ian McMillan on the Whitsun Weddings

This weekend is Whitsun, and while the festival may no longer resonate, Larkin's best-loved poem, lives on - along with the train journey at the heart of it
Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath in a new light

Songs from the bell jar

Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath
How one man's day in high heels showed him that Cannes must change its 'no flats' policy

One man's day in high heels

...showed him that Cannes must change its 'flats' policy
Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Dominic Rossi of Fidelity says his pressure on business to control rewards is working. But why aren’t other fund managers helping?
The King David Hotel gives precious work to Palestinians - unless peace talks are on

King David Hotel: Palestinians not included

The King David is special to Jerusalem. Nick Kochan checked in and discovered it has some special arrangements, too
More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years

End of the Aussie brain drain

More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years
Meditation is touted as a cure for mental instability but can it actually be bad for you?

Can meditation be bad for you?

Researching a mass murder, Dr Miguel Farias discovered that, far from bringing inner peace, meditation can leave devotees in pieces
Eurovision 2015: Australians will be cheering on their first-ever entrant this Saturday

Australia's first-ever Eurovision entrant

Australia, a nation of kitsch-worshippers, has always loved the Eurovision Song Contest. Maggie Alderson says it'll fit in fine