Carroll puts Newcastle in festive mood

Newcastle United 3 Liverpool 1: Striker turns home fans' jeers at owner Ashley into cheers as Pardew era gets off to a flying start

There was a time when the good folk of Newcastle used to ascend the hill to Gallowgate truly screaming for blood. In 1829 some 20,000 of them trekked up the slope from the city centre to see Jane Jameson get her just deserts. The murderess came by cart, sitting on her coffin.

The Novocastrians were in a state of restlessness yesterday before Alan Pardew took his seat in the dugout at the football ground built on the site of the old town moor gallows. If he had the look of a condemned man, it was hardly surprising, given the near-funereal reaction to his arrival on Tyneside.

The locals had not exactly come to bury Pardew with praise but by the final whistle they were celebrating his maiden victory as the new manager of Newcastle, the Magpies' first in six matches. It was a sometime sinner who helped to make it a flying start for the former manager of the Saints, Joey Barton crowning a fine display by toepoking Newcastle into a 2-1 lead 10 minutes from time. An Andy Carroll cracker put the issue beyond doubt.

The object of the Toon Army's ire was not Pardew, unloved though he might be as the replacement for the popular Chris Hughton. The hundred or so locals who vocalised their dissatisfaction outside the main entrance before kick-off directed their bile at Mike Ashley, the Newcastle owner. "You fat Cockney bastard, get out of our club," sung to the tune of "Sloop John B", was their most popular refrain.

Pardew might be a Cockney, by Geordie definition at least, but could hardly be described as corpulent. At kick-off time the chant reverberated around the arena, with a smirking Ashley taking his seat next to managing director Derek Llambias high up in the Milburn Stand, and Pardew positioning himself in the homedug-out virtually unnoticed.

The new Newcastle manager selected the starting XI in consultation with reserve-team coaches Peter Beardsley and Steve Stone and, happily for him, it included Kevin Nolan and Barton, the influential midfielders having recovered from the injuries that forced them to miss the 3-1 defeat against West Bromwich Albion last Sunday. A quarter of an hour in, with Liverpool holding sway, Barton hoisted a free-kick from deep, Carroll nodded the ball down on the right edge of the Liverpool six-yard box and Nolan despatched a first-time shot past Jose Reina.

It took Pardew by surprise. He was busy unscrewing his water bottle and missed the moment of celebration – unlike Ashley, who was warmlyembraced by a female companion.

It could hardly have been a better first half for the new manager. The defence that had been at sixes, sevens and ultimately P45s at the Hawthorns the previous Sunday managed to hold itself together, though only just when Jose Enrique cleared a deflected Raul Meireles shot off the line in the 33rd minute.

Liverpool returned to the field with a snap in their stride and four minutes into the second half they were level – thanks to some less than tidy work by Newcastle's central defenders. A weak header by Sol Campbell presented Dirk Kuyt with an invitation to shoot but the Dutchman's low effort required a big deflection off the legs of Steven Taylor to find its way past Tim Krul.

It might have been 2-1 to the visitors a couple of minutes later had Krul not made a fine reflex save to deny Fernando Torres. As it was, Newcastle rode their luck and turned the tide. They were the dominant force, with Barton at the hub of their endeavour, long before they struck for a second time. That came in the 80th minute, Krul pumping the ball upfield, Carroll getting his head to it, substitute Nile Ranger flicking it on, and Barton poking it past Reina.

For good measure, in the first minute of injury time Carroll hammered home a left-footed drive from 25 yards. The natives were happy, but still restless. "Get out of our club," they chanted again as they streamed out on to Gallowgate.



Substitutes: Newcastle: Ameobi for Ranger (63), Smith for Nolan (87). Liverpool: Babel for Ngog (72), Jovanovic for Rodriguez (85), Routledge for Barton (90).

Bookings: Newcastle: Gutierrez, Tiote. Liverpool: Johnson.

Attendance: 50,137

Referee: Lee Mason

Man of the match: Barton

Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Caption competition
Caption competition
Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?

Bleacher Report

Daily Quiz
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

Day In a Page

The difference between America and Israel? There isn’t one

The difference between America and Israel? There isn’t one

Netanyahu knows he can get away with anything in America, says Robert Fisk
Families clubbing together to build their own affordable accommodation

Do It Yourself approach to securing a new house

Community land trusts marking a new trend for taking the initiative away from developers
Head of WWF UK: We didn’t send Cameron to the Arctic to see green ideas freeze

David Nussbaum: We didn’t send Cameron to the Arctic to see green ideas freeze

The head of WWF UK remains sanguine despite the Government’s failure to live up to its pledges on the environment
Author Kazuo Ishiguro on being inspired by shoot-outs and samurai

Author Kazuo Ishiguro on being inspired by shoot-outs and samurai

Set in a mythologised 5th-century Britain, ‘The Buried Giant’ is a strange beast
With money, corruption and drugs, this monk fears Buddhism in Thailand is a ‘poisoned fruit’

Money, corruption and drugs

The monk who fears Buddhism in Thailand is a ‘poisoned fruit’
America's first slavery museum established at Django Unchained plantation - 150 years after slavery outlawed

150 years after it was outlawed...

... America's first slavery museum is established in Louisiana
Kelly Clarkson: How I snubbed Simon Cowell and become a Grammy-winning superstar

Kelly Clarkson: How I snubbed Simon Cowell and become a Grammy-winning superstar

The first 'American Idol' winner on how she manages to remain her own woman – Jane Austen fascination and all
Tony Oursler on exploring our uneasy relationship with technology with his new show

You won't believe your eyes

Tony Oursler's new show explores our uneasy relationship with technology. He's one of a growing number of artists with that preoccupation
Ian Herbert: Peter Moores must go. He should never have been brought back to fail again

Moores must go. He should never have been brought back to fail again

The England coach leaves players to find solutions - which makes you wonder where he adds value, says Ian Herbert
War with Isis: Fears that the looming battle for Mosul will unleash 'a million refugees'

The battle for Mosul will unleash 'a million refugees'

Aid agencies prepare for vast exodus following planned Iraqi offensive against the Isis-held city, reports Patrick Cockburn
Yvette Cooper: We can't lose the election. There's too much on the line

Yvette Cooper: We can't lose the election. There's too much on the line

The shadow Home Secretary on fighting radical Islam, protecting children, and why anyone in Labour who's thinking beyond May must 'sort themselves out'
A bad week for the Greens: Leader Natalie Bennett's 'car crash' radio interview is followed by Brighton council's failure to set a budget due to infighting

It's not easy being Green

After a bad week in which its leader had a public meltdown and its only city council couldn't agree on a budget vote, what next for the alternative party? It's over to Caroline Lucas to find out
Gorillas nearly missed: BBC producers didn't want to broadcast Sir David Attenborough's famed Rwandan encounter

Gorillas nearly missed

BBC producers didn't want to broadcast Sir David Attenborough's famed Rwandan encounter
Downton Abbey effect sees impoverished Italian nobles inspired to open their doors to paying guests for up to €650 a night

The Downton Abbey effect

Impoverished Italian nobles are opening their doors to paying guests, inspired by the TV drama
China's wild panda numbers have increased by 17% since 2003, new census reveals

China's wild panda numbers on the up

New census reveals 17% since 2003