Jarvis: Wolves squad are allbehind Connor

 

The Wolves winger Matt Jarvis said yesterday that the club's caretaker manager, Terry Connor, remained "the man for the job" despite the club's slide to the bottom of the Premier League. The Midlands club have conceded 14 goals in four games under Connor and they suffered their 10th home defeat of the season in a 5-0 hammering by the league leaders, Manchester United, on Sunday.

There has been speculation that Connor's position could come under threat even though he has been placed in charge until the end of the season as a temporary replacement for Mick McCarthy, who was sacked after a 5-1 home defeat by local rivals West Bromwich Albion.

Jarvis was adamant that Connor retained the backing of the whole squad ahead of this weekend's vital match against Norwich at Carrow Road. "It is not easy for TC," he said, "but we are all behind him, working hard and giving 100 per cent for him, ourselves and the club. He is still the man for the job, of course he is. He knows us all and is doing everything to turn things around.

"We are the same and hopefully we can repay him for his efforts and keep Wolves up. We are not going to give up. You see positive signs in training and from the shape of the team and the work-rate. Everyone knows their jobs and are working for each other. We just need to get a result, a bit of good fortune, and hopefully that will kick-start things."

Wolves hope the midfielders Karl Henry and Nenad Milijas will be available for the Norwich game. The pair are set to return to training after making good progress from hamstring and thigh injuries respectively. The club are still awaiting news on the fitness of another midfielder, David Davis, who suffered a suspected broken rib in the loss to United.

Meanwhile, the midfielder Jamie O'Hara has been ruled out of action for a further four weeks with his ongoing groin problem. O'Hara has struggled to regain full fitness since undergoing surgery in December and has required painkilling injections to play after returning to action last month.

Connor said yesterday that O'Hara was to undertake a "four-week rehabilitation programme", in order to ensure that he is firing on all cylinders on his return, in time for the season's finale.

O'Hara had already used Twitter to indicate he would not return until 100 per cent fit, after missing the 5-0 hammering by United. He has struggled to reproduce his best form because of the injury and was confronted by angry fans outside Molineux after a 2-0 defeat by Blackburn 10 days ago.

Connor said: "Jamie is going to go through a rehabilitation programme to give his groin the chance to get 100 per cent right. I think they're looking at a four-week programme. It would be great if it was only two or three weeks but he will need time to recover and rehab properly so that when he comes back he's firing on all cylinders."

Wolves have been jinxed by injuries in central midfield, losing the Arsenal loanee Emmanuel Frimpong to a season-ending knee injury as well as Milijas, Henry and Davis to shorter-term problems. O'Hara said on Twitter: "Since I've come back from it [the injury], I've had to have injections for games and haven't been able to train. I haven't been able to play at the levels I expect from myself so I've decided until I'm 100 per cent in my groins then I'll be out. I probably came back too early cos I was so desperate to play and help the team."

Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Latest in Sport
Sport
Caption competition
Caption competition
Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?

Bleacher Report

Daily Quiz
SPONSORED FEATURES
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

Day In a Page

Solved after 200 years: the mysterious deaths of 3,000 soldiers from Napoleon's army

Solved after 200 years

The mysterious deaths of 3,000 soldiers from Napoleon's army
Every regional power has betrayed the Kurds so Turkish bombing is no surprise

Robert Fisk on the Turkey conflict

Every regional power has betrayed the Kurds so Turkish bombing is no surprise
Investigation into wreck of unidentified submarine found off the coast of Sweden

Sunken sub

Investigation underway into wreck of an unidentified submarine found off the coast of Sweden
Instagram and Facebook have 'totally changed' the way people buy clothes

Age of the selfie

Instagram and Facebook have 'totally changed' the way people buy clothes
Not so square: How BBC's Bloomsbury saga is sexing up the period drama

Not so square

How Virginia Woolf saga is sexing up the BBC period drama
Rio Olympics 2016: The seven teenagers still carrying a torch for our Games hopes

Still carrying the torch

The seven teenagers given our Olympic hopes
The West likes to think that 'civilisation' will defeat Isis, but history suggests otherwise

The West likes to think that 'civilisation' will defeat Isis...

...but history suggests otherwise
The bald truth: How one author's thinning hair made him a Wayne Rooney sympathiser

The bald truth

How thinning hair made me a Wayne Rooney sympathiser
Froome wins second Tour de France after triumphant ride into Paris with Team Sky

Tour de France 2015

Froome rides into Paris to win historic second Tour
Fifteen years ago, Concorde crashed, and a dream died. Today, the desire to travel faster than the speed of sound is growing once again

A new beginning for supersonic flight?

Concorde's successors are in the works 15 years on from the Paris crash
I would never quit Labour, says Liz Kendall

I would never quit party, says Liz Kendall

Latest on the Labour leadership contest
Froome seals second Tour de France victory

Never mind Pinot, it’s bubbly for Froome

Second Tour de France victory all but sealed
Oh really? How the 'lowest form of wit' makes people brighter and more creative

The uses of sarcasm

'Lowest form of wit' actually makes people brighter and more creative
A magazine editor with no vanity, and lots of flair

No vanity, but lots of flair

A tribute to the magazine editor Ingrid Sischy
Foraging: How the British rediscovered their taste for chasing after wild food

In praise of foraging

How the British rediscovered their taste for wild food