Kenny Dalglish keen to tame 'wild' expectations

Liverpool manager Kenny Dalglish has warned the success he has enjoyed in his first five months in charge will not be replicated next season if complacency sets in.

The Scot yesterday completed the formalities of a three-year contract which gives him the long-term stability to work on a plan to restore former glories.

However, he believes "mad, wild predictions" about what could happen in the 2011/12 campaign should be ignored.

With Manchester United on the brink of securing their 19th title, surpassing Liverpool's record of 18, there is a desperation among fans to level things up again as quickly as possible.

But with the club destined for their second successive finish outside the top four, Dalglish is keen for the club to build on the progress made during the early part of his second reign as Reds boss.

And he stressed his appointment as permanent manager would not just make that happen and everyone had to continue striving to improve.

"We are not going to make any predictions but we cannot afford to think because we are finishing strong that is us set up for next year," said the 60-year-old.

"There won't be any complacency for next year because of what has happened this year, we also should not get carried away.

"We couldn't have asked for much more (since taking over from Roy Hodgson in January) - but we will next year.

"People are making mad, wild predictions about what is going to happen but the most important thing for us is we have the determination and the effort to put in a good show next year.

"What happens from there will happen."

Dalglish is the last manager to win the title with Liverpool, back in 1990, before quitting the following season as he felt he needed a break from the game having coped admirably with the Hillsborough tragedy two years previously.

He went on to win the Premier League at Blackburn but always felt he had unfinished business at Anfield, and after a couple of occasions when he felt he was close to a return he is now firmly ensconced in what he believes is his spiritual home.

The transformation he has overseen in such a short period of time, lifting the club from four points above the relegation zone in 12th to favourites for Europa League qualification, has been remarkable.

A win against Tottenham at Anfield on Sunday will guarantee fifth spot but Dalglish admits he is unsure how big a challenge it may be restoring the success he had in his first spell in charge, when he won three titles and two FA Cups.

"Whether it's more difficult to get there or stay there is open to debate, but the only common denominator is wanting to get better. That's the priority, to get better," he added.

"So this is no different to last time. If I make more correct than wrong decisions, it won't go too badly.

"But we are not going to sit here and shout our mouth off about what we are going to do.

"When we came back in January there were no promises from anyone as to what to expect.

"We never had any expectation other than to do the best we could in every game.

"I never set any targets, although obviously we had to improve.

"It was an ideal opportunity for me to prove that I had something to offer.

"We're just going to work and do the best we possibly can because a lot of people care an awful lot about the football club and we've got to prove we feel the same way.

"Everyone has got together and you are a stronger force if you are one unit."

By bringing in Dalglish in January owners Fenway Sports Group, without knowing it, appear to have remedied a number of problems at the same time.

Performances and results have improved drastically, the atmosphere is much more positive and there has already been a progression of youngsters from the academy to the first team with the likes of teenagers John Flanagan and Jack Robinson fast-tracked because of injuries.

"The owners want to take the club forward, are well prepared to take the club forward and want to take it onwards and upwards," said Dalglish.

"I think we have a rosy future, we have kids at the academy who are looking very promising but we're not getting carried away."

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