Liverpool 'shocked' at 10-game ban for Luis Suarez

Anfield club consider appeal against severity of the punishment for striker biting Ivanovic

Liverpool have reacted with shock and dismay to the 10-game suspension handed out to Luis Suarez for biting Branislav Ivanovic, suggesting they are ready to appeal against the Football Association independent regulatory commission's verdict.

On top of the statutory three-game ban for violent conduct, the panel gave Suarez an additional seven-game suspension for trying to bite the arm of the Chelsea defender during Sunday's game at Anfield.

Liverpool, who had already implied they would appeal against any ban over three games, expressed their disappointment with the verdict even though the FA signalled before the hearing that three games would be "clearly insufficient for the offence".

The club's managing director, Ian Ayre, said: "Both the club and player are shocked and disappointed at the severity of the independent regulatory commission decision. We await the written reasons before making any further comment."

Suarez, Liverpool and the FA will receive the commission's report today. Only once they have digested the full reason behind the additional seven-game ban can any party begin to contemplate an appeal, although Liverpool's stance of supporting the player through both this and his previous involvement with the commission – when he was charged and found guilty of racially abusing Patrice Evra – suggests they will challenge the decision. Especially as after the Evra verdict Liverpool also stated they were "very surprised and disappointed".

Ayre said the day after the biting incident that Liverpool hoped the player would stay at Anfield for the remaining four years of his contract, although the club fined him two weeks' wages, believed to be in excess of £200,000.

Suarez was warned during the Evra hearing about his future conduct and the eight-game suspension he was given then is a likely reason why the punishment was a 10-game ban. The player was also found guilty of making a gesture towards Fulham fans in December 2011, which brought him a one-game suspension.

Suarez will miss the next three games against Newcastle, Everton and Fulham regardless of whether an appeal is made. However, Liverpool have until 12pm tomorrow to launch an appeal against the length of the suspension. They may yet find the reason given by the panel leaves them little scope to challenge the report's findings, and their support of the player for whom they paid Ajax £23m may have to remain a verbal one. It is clear they do not want to lose a striker who has scored 23 Premier League goals this season.

There is also the possibility the commission simply found the behaviour of Suarez, in biting an opponent, deplorable in its own right and deemed that worthy of an additional seven-game suspension. Suarez received a seven-game ban from the Dutch FA when he bit the PSV Eindhoven player Otman Bakkal in November 2010.

Any appeal would also carry the possibility of having the length of Suarez's ban extended, as a new panel would sit. It may also be shown that the FA asked for a longer suspension, given the extraordinary nature of Suarez's offence and his previous misconduct in the English game.

It is expected that the findings of the three-man panel, made up of a former player, a member of the FA Council and a lawyer, will not be made public until the parties involved have had the chance to digest the reasons given for the length of the suspension. In the previous two high-profile cases involving John Terry and then Suarez and Evra, the FA eventually published the findings on their own website and, given the controversial nature of the incident and the length of ban, that is likely to happen again.

If Liverpool and Suarez do not appeal against the length of the suspension, the forward would also miss the final Premier League game of the season against Queen's Park Rangers plus the first five league games at the start of next season, as well as a League Cup tie, assuming, of course, that he is still a Liverpool player at that point.

Related articles...

Ian Herbert: Liverpool striker Luis Suarez - an ideal pantomime villain for the age of outrage

Jamie Carragher admits Luis Suarez bite was 'shocking', but thinks Liverpool are right to stick by him

Luis Suarez: Two bites, a racism charge and one of the world's best footballers - the controversial career of the Liverpool striker

Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Caption competition
Caption competition
  • Get to the point
Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?

Bleacher Report

Daily Quiz
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

Day In a Page

The saffron censorship that governs India: Why national pride and religious sentiment trump freedom of expression

The saffron censorship that governs India

Zareer Masani reveals why national pride and religious sentiment trump freedom of expression
Prince Charles' 'black spider' letters to be published 'within weeks'

Prince Charles' 'black spider' letters to be published 'within weeks'

Supreme Court rules Dominic Grieve's ministerial veto was invalid
Distressed Zayn Malik fans are cutting themselves - how did fandom get so dark?

How did fandom get so dark?

Grief over Zayn Malik's exit from One Direction seemed amusing until stories of mass 'cutting' emerged. Experts tell Gillian Orr the distress is real, and the girls need support
The galaxy collisions that shed light on unseen parallel Universe

The cosmic collisions that have shed light on unseen parallel Universe

Dark matter study gives scientists insight into mystery of space
The Swedes are adding a gender-neutral pronoun to their dictionary

Swedes introduce gender-neutral pronoun

Why, asks Simon Usborne, must English still struggle awkwardly with the likes of 's/he' and 'they'?
Disney's mega money-making formula: 'Human' remakes of cartoon classics are part of a lucrative, long-term creative plan

Disney's mega money-making formula

'Human' remakes of cartoon classics are part of a lucrative, long-term creative plan
Lobster has gone mainstream with supermarket bargains for £10 or less - but is it any good?

Lobster has gone mainstream

Anthea Gerrie, raised on meaty specimens from the waters around Maine, reveals how to cook up an affordable feast
Easter 2015: 14 best decorations

14 best Easter decorations

Get into the Easter spirit with our pick of accessories, ornaments and tableware
Paul Scholes column: Gareth Bale would be a perfect fit at Manchester United and could turn them into serious title contenders next season

Paul Scholes column

Gareth Bale would be a perfect fit at Manchester United and could turn them into serious title contenders next season
Inside the Kansas greenhouses where Monsanto is 'playing God' with the future of the planet

The future of GM

The greenhouses where Monsanto 'plays God' with the future of the planet
Britain's mild winters could be numbered: why global warming is leaving UK chillier

Britain's mild winters could be numbered

Gulf Stream is slowing down faster than ever, scientists say
Government gives £250,000 to Independent appeal

Government gives £250,000 to Independent appeal

Donation brings total raised by Homeless Veterans campaign to at least £1.25m
Oh dear, the most borrowed book at Bank of England library doesn't inspire confidence

The most borrowed book at Bank of England library? Oh dear

The book's fifth edition is used for Edexcel exams
Cowslips vs honeysuckle: The hunt for the UK’s favourite wildflower

Cowslips vs honeysuckle

It's the hunt for UK’s favourite wildflower
Child abuse scandal: Did a botched blackmail attempt by South African intelligence help Cyril Smith escape justice?

Did a botched blackmail attempt help Cyril Smith escape justice?

A fresh twist reveals the Liberal MP was targeted by the notorious South African intelligence agency Boss