Manchester City midfielder Fernandinho eyes trophies in 2014 after scoring first Premier League goal of the New Year

The Brazilian has eyes for the Premier League, League Cup, FA Cup, Champions League and a home World Cup success with Brazil after making the best possible start to the year

Manchester City midfielder Fernandinho is hoping 2014 will be the best year of his life as he targets success with club and country.

The 28-year-old Brazil international got the new year off to the best possible start by scoring the opener in City's 3-2 win at Swansea on Wednesday.

City start 2014 still in contention for the Premier League, Champions League and Capital One Cup, while their FA Cup campaign kicks off at Blackburn this weekend.

There is also the small matter of Brazil hosting this summer's World Cup finals, and former Shakhtar Donetsk midfielder Fernandinho knows the next 12 months could represent the high point of his career.

"This was a good way to start the year, to score a goal and the team to win. I hope I can keep playing like this and the team can keep winning," he said.

"If I have success with City and Brazil this year that would be the best year of my life, of my career.

"But for now I must concentrate on the games and see what happens afterwards. We just have to prepare well for each game, and be ready. I hope we can keep challenging for all four trophies."

Fernandinho has won five caps for his country but competition for places in midfield is fierce with the likes of Lucas Leiva, Ramires and Paulinho all pushing for places.

The City man has helped his own cause by finding his touch in front of goal recently, scoring three in his last five appearances, although he was quick to play down any impact that may have on his Brazil hopes.

"It is always good when you score goals, you help your team," he said. "But the most important thing is the team and we showed we are a good strong team and we want to win the Premier League.

"I don't know why I am scoring more at the moment, for my three goals I was near the edge of the box and it means there is more chance to score."

He added: "Luiz Felipe Scolari (the Brazil coach) has been around watching players. He has been in Portugal, in Italy. I am sure he will be here watching me and other players and that is no problem. I will keep trying to play well here."

The win over Swansea means City remain a point behind current league leaders Arsenal in what is proving a fiendishly difficult title race to call.

But Citizens boss Manuel Pellegrini has no doubt his men can handle the pressure.

"I think it's impossible to be in a good team if you don't want pressure, you must be used to playing with pressure," he said.

"I think all the other teams have the same pressure - Chelsea, Arsenal, Liverpool, Manchester United, Tottenham, Everton.

"If they want to say that the pressure is on Manchester City it's no problem for us."

PA

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