Michael Laudrup dismisses rumours of dressing room unrest at Swansea

 

Michael Laudrup has dismissed talk of dressing room unrest at Swansea and insists it will not jeopardise their Premier League campaign.

Reports in the national media last week suggested the Dane was facing a rebellion from senior players, who it was said had held meetings with chairman Huw Jenkins over dissatisfaction with Laudrup's training methods.

The club quickly issued a statement strenuously denying the reports, and Laudrup today re-iterated that denial.

The former Getafe and Real Mallorca boss made it clear Jenkins would have brought any such complaints to his attention immediately and there was no truth in the reports.

Swansea have not won in five Premier League games and Laudrup believes that run has played a part in the timing of the reports, but believes a victory over Wigan on Saturday will quell any speculation of rumblings of discontent.

When asked if he was disgruntled by the reports, Laudrup said: "No, because if there was a problem I know the chairman would have told me there is a problem and say we have to talk about things.

"He didn't do that and I know through the times we have spoken he would never allow any person - and I don't say a player - to jeopardise the harmony of this club.

"I don't see so much in it. It doesn't mean you don't have players who are not satisfied - it happens in all teams, even at clubs at the top when players are not playing.

"But we are all going in the same direction and people are training and doing what's needed to be done so there is no problem."

He added: "When you see something your reaction is 'what's happening?'.

"But then you start to think it over and speak to people involved and realise it's really nothing, that you always have players who don't play and may not be satisfied.

"We all know and I know for sure all small things, articles, negative things in the media, mostly come out when you don't win and results on the pitch are not that good, and we have to admit that's our case at the moment, even if the last game was very positive.

"But I really wouldn't give it so much importance and it's more than a week ago so it's case closed and we move on and look to the important thing, which is the game against Wigan."

Swansea lie 11th in the table, four places ahead of Wigan, who have former Swans boss Roberto Martinez in charge.

And Laudrup paid tribute to the work the Spaniard has done, in south Wales and at the DW Stadium.

He said: "He deserves a lot of credit, he plays another system in Wigan than he did here but he wants to play football, although he is Spanish so it is not a big surprise.

"To be honest I think Wigan deserve more points than they have. I have seen nearly all their games and in at least two of them they have deserved much more than they achieved, against Sunderland for instance.

"But maybe we have deserved a couple of better results, but we can't turn back the clock, we can only look forward and that is what we are doing."

PA

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