Robin van Persie reveals he wants to extend his contract with Manchester United and is targeting at least 'two or three trophies this season'

Former Arsenal striker keen to extend contract that has three years left to run

Robin van Persie has admitted he would like to extend his contract to keep him at Manchester United beyond the three years that he has left on his current deal.

Last season’s Golden Boot winner made an impressive start to his Old Trafford career following the completion of his £22.5m move from Arsenal, scoring 26 goals as United eased to the Premier League title.

The successful campaign was van Persie’s first league title win of his career, having won the Uefa Cup with Feyenoord and the FA Cup with Arsenal in 2005 – the Gunners last major trophy success. The Dutchman said at the time of his move that it was for footballing reasons rather than financial, and his decision was vindicated as he continued his tremendous form that he has maintained over the past two-and-a-half years.

Having tasted success, van Persie told former United player Paddy Crerand that he wants to remain a United player for a long time to come, and is also hopeful on claiming two or three torphies this season.

“I have three more years to go and I would like to stay longer,” the 30-year-old said in an exclusive interview for MUTV. “I know, and I see people around me, making decisions where I think these guys will look back and say ‘was that a good one?’. I don't want that.

“I want to play as long as possible at the highest level.

“That (winning trophies) is what it is all about,” he said. “Last year we got one trophy in four. Now we have to look at it from the opposite side.

“We have the chance to get five this year. How many do we get out of those five? In my opinion we should be able to win two or three.”

One of the trophies van Persie – and United – missed out on last season was the Champions League after the club were knocked-out of the tournament by Real Madrid in the last-16.

The tie turned on a controversial red card for van Persie’s team-mate Nani, with the Premier League champions going on to record a 2-1 defeat in the second leg after a 1-1 draw in the first.

But the 30-year-old, who played all 180 minutes against Real, has said that the match was his only disappointment of last season and it is something he hopes to correct this campaign.

“It is probably my only regret about last year,” Van Persie said.

“The referee played an important part but I should have scored at least one or two goals in those games. I didn't, which I don't like. I have to improve on that.

“Hopefully we can do better this year.”

United get their European campaign underway tomorrow night when they travel to Germany to take on Bayer Leverkusen, who they are yet to lose to having met the club in the same tournament in 2001-02 and 2002-03.

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